What is the advantage of a pine Telecaster?

guitarbuilder

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When installing screws in "softwoods", you use a slightly smaller drill bit than you normally would for dense " hardwoods". Screw stripping is caused by over torquing by the user, The wrong size screw, or thread pitch, not the material or the screw. You can look up the specifications in an engineer's manual. All these cheap pawlonia bodies would have the same problem if it was the wood's fault. I suspect it is internet BS.


 
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solofiddle

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I have a pinecaster that I bought off eBay. Solid neck, no trussrod. I added the pickguard. It sounds awesome. I forget what the pickups are, but they sound great. This guitar is a weird color but I end up leaving it out and playing it more than other Teles I have.
 

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Junior59

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I see some builders like Ron Kirn offering a pine Tele. I think that Leo started with pine before switching to Ash / Alder. How do they sound?
Here’s how my pine 70th Anniversary sounds-

I like the sound and I love the light weight. It’s a good ‘un.
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strat54

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Obviously not worth anything because Leo made them out of pine.
You bring up a valid point. I guess if you are considering pine then you might have more of an interest in the TONE you are going to get instead of whether you can sell it for top dollar in the future. Kind of like buying a baseball glove and breaking it in so it is just right for you and not necessarily for anyone else. Or like your favorite pair of worn in or out comfy blue jeans.:)
 

4everjoeking

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Does that engineering manual take into account removal and replacement of parts or the stresses placed on the screws of the strap buttons from the rigors of stage performance?
 

MrNoTalent

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I have a Hahn Model C made of sugar pine...very light and sounds great to me, although I'm not a good player....seems like with all the effects pedals and amps you can make any guitar sound like anything you want
 

bluesmain

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i ordered a pine body double countour (2 pc) 1-1/2 '' thick
i hand rubbed minwax trublack wood finish..looking at a warmoth neck sold my mahogany neck have benson custom tele blues p/u set and a 4 way switch waiting trying to thin out...LOL.so currently two strat neck teles on stands in my br
lost in space but happy to play ...shook George Fullerton's hand at NAMM..whispered in his ear '' I own GF0042 ''
got a big grin...history of 50 plus playing years....
the dark tele is quilt maple over pine hand rubbed truoil
kept it sounds good hand carved walnut strat neck cured
with superglue then hand rubbed nitro lacquer benson custom tele set 4 way switch
 

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Beebe

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They are light weight.

The wood is abundant and affordable.

Maybe a bit hollow sounding, but this could be because mine has a swimming pool route.

I tend to like Mahogany over Ash or Alder, and I like Alder over Ash, and I really like Pine as well, so maybe if you like Mahogany you will like it?

A downside is how soft and easy to dent the wood is.

Great candidates for binding. Easy to route the soft wood, and the binding adds durability to to the soft edges.
 

Bluzzi

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I see some builders like Ron Kirn offering a pine Tele. I think that Leo started with pine before switching to Ash / Alder. How do they sound?
I have built 2 Tele's with Pine. It was the cheapest body available so it wasn't a choice but it turned out a lucky accident. Both sound exceptional! Of course the Brian Monty necks help!

Both are light and have great tone and perfect sustain. Not too much not too little and the harmonic bloom of the notes is just beautiful. The bodies cost me $40 Canadian funds! That is around $32 U.S.. All cavities drilled. It's a retired guy that has a large wood shop. I picked them up but I believe he sells on eBay. I handpicked mine and maybe that helped with the final result?

On my first one I anticipated a brittle thin tone but was pleasantly surprised when it played and sounded like a top of the line Tele worth thousands more.

Pine Tele? For sure! Go for it.
 

guitarbuilder

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Does that engineering manual take into account removal and replacement of parts or the stresses placed on the screws of the strap buttons from the rigors of stage performance?

Strap buttons, especially the rear one are in end grain. End grain doesn't hold screws very well. Any species of timber will have an issue in that spot including alder and swamp ash. A. Use a longer screw or B. add a piece of flatsawn plug in there if it does strip out. Replacement parts...make sure the pitch of the screw is the same or use the same screws.... If you are EVH...use lag bolts with screw eyes.

Engineering manuals will tell you how much weight a screw can hold. Way more than you think.

Necks are held on by screws and most of the time the necks are maple. The neck screw holes in the body are sized to allow the screw to drop through. Stripped neck holes are common due to the same reasons I mentioned above.

Now the density of pine or other less dense timber could cause the neck plate to bend or compress the wood there a bit ..that is true.
 
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Beebe

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Here is a Georgia red oak Timber Rattler Tele that I carved a few years back. My neighbor across the creek has big, 2" slabs that he dried for about 7 years so I grabbed one. Pickups are Lollar gold foils. View attachment 1034987 View attachment 1034988 View attachment 1035005

That thing is amazing.

All these Oaks they planted here in Atlanta after the Civil War are massive now and coming down one by one each time it rains.

I think it's time for the city to harvest them all and plant something new.

In this part of GA we have a lot more copperheads than rattlers. A copperhead version in the cards maybe?
 

vintage918

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Happen to catch this thread, have started a partscaster build with this 35 year old single pine board body with a maple burl top. Just a very light stain as I wanted to keep all the wild figuring as it darkens with age. Many hand rubbed coats of French Polish. Have a ways to go yet, it weighs 3lbs 14 oz so far with the birds eye neck and a contoured heel plate. The other neck sits on a sapele body which is a boat anchor and the test bed. Blondie and Brownie.
 

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Bluzzi

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Hmmmm. I dunno. I mean, it's soft and all, but if you're a relic kinda guy, you'd like that. From working with white pine a bit, I can say it feels fragile compared to heavy ash, for sure. It'll dent if you look at it too hard. But it's lighter overall, and that can be an advantage to some. I've heard you can harden pine with, well, a hardener. I don't know what that would do to the wood's other qualities.

I tend to slink away from discussions about tone woods, but as another person wrote, it has fine resonance acoustically, and that carries into its plugged-in sound as well. You'll know only when you play one. :)
I agree it is soft but I don't care. I got to build 2 Teles that sound fantastic for a fraction of the price. The necks and pickups were the main cost. But I always say I don't look at the guitar when I am playing it so I don't care what it looks like then. I just care how it sounds and how it feels in the hands.

But yeah if you are OCD about dings and bumps on our guitars then Pine is not for you. If you are a player and aesthetics are nice but secondary then Pine is fine. For me it was just so cheap I could not resist. Although it was my first Tele builds I do not regret it and the two I built are my favourite guitars right now. I own an ES335, Les Paul, Strat etc.. All great instruments but I am slowly being seduced by Tele's. The 2nd I built has P90's and I use it mostly plugged into a Princeton. Perfect match! I don't know what it is but these pine Tele's just feel so light and right in my hands!
 
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ChicknPickn

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I agree it is soft but I don't care. I got to build 2 Teles that sound fantastic for a fraction of the price. The necks and pickups were the main cost. But I always say I don't look at the guitar when I am playing it so I don't care what it looks like then. I just care how it sounds and how it feels in the hands.

But yeah if you are OCD about dings and bumps on our guitars then Pine is not for you. If you are a player and aesthetics are nice but secondary then Pine is fine. For me it was just so cheap I could not resist. Although it was my first Tele builds I do not regret it and the two I built are my favourite guitars right now. I own an ES335, Les Paul, Strat etc.. All great instruments but I am slowly being seduced by Tele's. The 2nd I built has P90's and I use it mostly plugged into a Princeton. Perfect match! I don't know what it is but these pine Tele's just feel so light and right in my hands!
Oh yeah. I know what you mean. Recently, when I decided that ONE of my teles was going to get the deluxe treatment with a custom Warmoth neck (fat, with 6105 stainless frets) - - close to $400 worth - - I gave that honor to my piney. Not sure why, but I just felt that it would go from great to sublime. And you know what? As I was playing it acoustically, even my wife wanted to know which of my guitars I was picking. We musicians have to be wary of confirmation bias with subjective things, but dings and all, this guitar has the sweetest voice of any electric I own. The Warmoth, also, is a winner.
 

Havins

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Pine, Ash, Paulowania.....? get whatever turns you on......the pickups and the amp make a lot more differnce in the sound than the type of wood....I've had guitars of all kinds of wood....just choose the type of pickups and the amp for the sound that you want. The best sounding Telecaster I've ever found at a guitar store is a Brad Paisley Telecaster. I pluged it into a Deluxe Reverb, a Twin, and a Super Champ X2 that were next to each other......it sounded great in all of them but was outstanding in the SC X2......who knew........I now have the Brad Paisley Esquire that I'm just now finishing the refinish on.....I bought the X2 a couple of years ago......Fender Fuse makes the amp versatile as hell....
 

Maguchi

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I haven't seen anything more recent, but with a 'new' model appearing seemingly every other week it would be obsolete immediately! There was, of course, the Blackguard Book, but that very specifically covers early models-and it's expensive, if you can find one of the very limited run. While being a wonderfully researched and profusely illustrated work, it's a little too 'nerdy' for my taste (no offence!).
A friend has the Blackguard book and I skimmed the pages. Not sure if there's anything in there or not about pine bodied guitars and Leo switching to ash early on. Although the Forrest White book below is older, it's very good too. And White also writes about Fender switching to ash because pine was too soft.

IMHO the older books and the ones written by the principles like Forrest White are closer to the source and the history than newer books. After all, the excerpt I cited and the topic of this thread is "advantage of a pine Telecaster" and "Leo started with pine before switching to ash." And pine bodies were initially made and stopped being made by Fender in 1950.

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