What is the advantage of a pine Telecaster?

CalebAaron666

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I have a 1.5” pine Esquire built by Mattos Custom Guitars here in Maine. The body is cut from a 200 year old slab of pine salvaged from what was the first stage-coach stop built north of Boston in Wells, Maine.
It’s under 7 lbs and sounds incredible. I like it much more than my boat-anchor ash tele.

As well as being a good player, I think it looks really cool, nail holes, knots, burn marks and all. I know this type of thing isn’t for everyone. Those that dig it, dig it the most.
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2HBStrat

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Hmmmm. I dunno. I mean, it's soft and all, but if you're a relic kinda guy, you'd like that. From working with white pine a bit, I can say it feels fragile compared to heavy ash, for sure. It'll dent if you look at it too hard. But it's lighter overall, and that can be an advantage to some. I've heard you can harden pine with, well, a hardener. I don't know what that would do to the wood's other qualities.

I tend to slink away from discussions about tone woods, but as another person wrote, it has fine resonance acoustically, and that carries into its plugged-in sound as well. You'll know only when you play one. :)
I'm pretty sure that my 2020 American Professional II Telecaster has a pine body...
 

57joonya

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I know there are lots of people in here that have some great pine bodied guitars , but I personally wish I had built my pine bodied hardtail strat out of ash or alder . The body on this guitar is so soft , the neck plate is sunk into the wood probably an1/8.The low e string sounds and feels dull when hit ,
Like a soft thud instead of a bright twang . But it is super light . And for whatever reason is resonant and loud unplugged . I wish there was a way for me to have gotten my hands on one and seeing how it felt in person , but I never knew anyone who had one or even saw one. So that was a risk I knew I was taking . It’s a good guitar ,
But something is keeping it from being great , it would be really interesting to get another body and put the parts on and Test them back to back . Someday
 

ChicknPickn

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I know there are lots of people in here that have some great pine bodied guitars , but I personally wish I had built my pine bodied hardtail strat out of ash or alder . The body on this guitar is so soft , the neck plate is sunk into the wood probably an1/8.The low e string sounds and feels dull when hit ,
Like a soft thud instead of a bright twang . But it is super light . And for whatever reason is resonant and loud unplugged . I wish there was a way for me to have gotten my hands on one and seeing how it felt in person , but I never knew anyone who had one or even saw one. So that was a risk I knew I was taking . It’s a good guitar ,
But something is keeping it from being great , it would be really interesting to get another body and put the parts on and Test them back to back . Someday
For what it's worth, I like my ole' piney a lot, but one will probably be enough as far as building one myself goes. I think cutting a pine body is a fine way for someone to practice before working on an expensive slab of ash, alder, etc. Very easy on the cutting tools. Smells good when you're cutting it, too. 🙂
 

57joonya

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There are over 100 species of pines, divided between the soft pines and the hard pines, and not surprisingly there's a great deal of variation in their properties, particularly- for a guitar maker- their density.
This is true , I had ordered mine through the guitar mill , and assumed they would hand select fairly hard pine.
 

ponycar

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I have been collecting vintage guitars since the late '80s. I've been refinishing laquer since then, and building laquer finish solid bodies for over 20 yrs. I've been selling off guitars and had thought that I'd eventually let all guitars go with the exception of my first ash strat that I'd take to my grave. Nope, it's now going to be a pinecaster that I did during covid. There is just something intangibly delicious about a pine tele. I'm currently doing one for my guitar teacher. Love 'em.
 

Wooly Fox

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I'm planning to treat myself to a Kauer Korona with a roasted pine body in a trans teal colour as used by MusicMan in the 90s. I think pine is an attractive wood and "can" be light but YMMV. The one I have tried from Fender Custom Shop was no more special than the alder ones but was a bit lighter and a reliced bodies.
 

joe.attaboy

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As a followup on my photo post, I'll mention that the body came from nomoonlaser, who regularly sells pine and other wood Telecaster bodies on eBay. I know he's been mentioned here frequently. He cuts the bodies to Fender specs and offers them in various colors. Very reasonable prices. He uses reclaimed pine and occasionally cedar and other woods.
 

Sax-son

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I built one and it sounds good. Similar to Alder in a way, but it does dent easily. That shouldn't be a problem for relic lovers because they like their guitars being all jacked up looking. Here is a picture of mine, a rare Warmoth run of pine bodies.
Pinecaster.JPG
 
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guitarmikey

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Bucharest
Light, great resonance, good looking grains, cheap wood! Most of my DIY’s are pine/reclaimed pine. Love them!
 

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boris bubbanov

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They do look awesome.
I sure like the appearance of the one shown. And Ron Kirn makes some real handsome ones.

But this is all about appearance. Once you plug in and turn up the volume, you're highly unlikely to discover a mystery advantage, or maybe you won't be able to tell it from alder or poplar (or even ash or mahogany). I've assembled a lot of this stuff and primarily, you're using visuals to appeal to the concertgoer or audience in a club. 99.9% of the work is still on your back. I guess I could be a cheerleader and try to get players motivated, but I'm preferring to just shoot straight on this.

I'm cutting down pine trees on these parcels I bought (saving the biggest and nicest trees and plants) with hand tools and there's 4 or maybe 5 species of "pine" and I am just flabbergasted, how much difference there is from the wood on one, to the wood on the next one. Pine can be very soft and it can be cement hard - can be feather light or WAY too heavy for a guitar body. And it can be very attractive or it can be very bland.
 

Chiogtr4x

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I built one and it sounds good. Similar to Alder in a way, but it does dent easily. That shouldn't be a problem for relic lovers because they like their guitars being all jacked up looking. Here is a picture of mine, a rare Warmoth run of pine bodies. View attachment 1034617

That's a really complimentary pickguard to the grain and tint of the body wood, IMO
Looks great!
 

CryptCaster

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The first Fender esquires were pine so there's definite "throwback" vibes to wanting a modern one, but I also have to echo a lot of what I read above - especially in pine's resonance and weight. They're light. They sing! I'd highly recommend getting your hands on one to try out. They really don't feel like their Alder and Ash cousins at all... in a good way!
 

rjtwangs

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Being far from knowledgeable when it comes to pine, I've been seriously considering ordering a guitar from Creston and he prefers to use California sugar pine for his pine bodied guitars. I can't tell you why, but that's what he likes.
Maybe someone here can tell us what the difference might be. I certainly have no idea! He is now also using torrefied white pine.


RJ
 




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