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What is the absolute most basic, easy-to-use DAW?

Discussion in 'Recording In Progress' started by Telecaster88, Sep 8, 2020.

  1. suthol

    suthol Friend of Leo's

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    Reaper goes way beyond basic recording capability, like all DAWs it gives as good as it gets from the input
     
  2. Nozebleeds

    Nozebleeds TDPRI Member

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    Reaper is insanely deep in features but it’s all under a simple surface. It’s super customisable and you can tweak until the cows come home (why I like it). But I used it for 6 years without learning more than the basics and nothing about actions, scripts, keyboard shortcuts etc
     
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  3. Old Smokey

    Old Smokey TDPRI Member

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    I always liked CoolEditPro... RIP
     
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  4. thesamhill

    thesamhill Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    I couldn't do it either.

    I read that you can do this in a hacky kind of way- if you only want 2 tracks- by recording a stereo track with vox 100% left, guitar 100% right, then split that stereo track into 2 mono tracks. You'd have to have an interface that could pan 2 inputs into a single hard left/hard right stereo signal I guess.

    I pretty quickly decided that it would be easier to record to a hardware multitracker (a Zoom H4n in my case) and transfer the files than to try to troubleshoot whatever I was doing wrong on the computer.

    Turned out to be moot. When I was recording at home, I only ever wanted to do one thing at a time so I could concentrate on doing that as best I could. For recording solo gigs, I used the H4n- guitar into track 1, vox into track 2, room noise through built-ins.
     
  5. Collin D Plonker

    Collin D Plonker Tele-Afflicted

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    You can cut your teeth on Audacity and
    Oh sorry, I got Studio One confused with the other DAW on my machine--Pro Tools First. I didn't like S1. I learned on Audacity, then moved on to PTF. I'm not sure how close it is to regular Pro Tools, but it's pretty powerful for a free program.
     
  6. samm57

    samm57 TDPRI Member

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    I found an easy fix to the latency issue. So simple it's scary. Feel free to contact me at [email protected]

    Sam
     
  7. samm57

    samm57 TDPRI Member

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    I use an older version of Sonar Cakewalk (7) and get good results. There is a lot to learn, but it's worth it. IMO to get decent results there is going to be a learning curve and time invested.....just like playing guitar.
     
  8. twimsatt

    twimsatt TDPRI Member

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    My DAW is Reaper. Maybe not the most basic but they have a zillion tutorial videos for just about everything you can do with it. Check 'em out on Youtube:
    https://www.youtube.com/c/REAPERMania
     
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  9. RomanS

    RomanS Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've used Reaper and Mixbus, and while Reaper can do a lot, I find Mixbus easier and more intuitive to use, simply because it is laid out like an analog mixing desk.
     
    Telecaster88 likes this.
  10. Brillig

    Brillig TDPRI Member

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    The online, web-based ones are the simplest. There are a bunch, google "online daw".

    Once you find yourself hitting the limits with those you'll feel more confident trying a more fully functional, but harder to learn, desktop DAW.
     
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  11. Robert Graf

    Robert Graf TDPRI Member

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    Look into Ableton Live. Great built in tutorial, and plenty of youtube videos. Loads of features, and you can demo everything. Also, you can buy just what you need.
     
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  12. snods

    snods TDPRI Member

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    Anyone try Waveform by Tracktion? They have a completely free version as well as a current 40% off on the pro version and all synths and addons. Lots of training videos too from Tracktion.
     
  13. johnny k

    johnny k Poster Extraordinaire

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    I would like to know more. Can you explain it here ? I have enough spam on my email box to be ready when another world war happens.
     
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  14. Gtar4jc

    Gtar4jc TDPRI Member

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    if you are iPad based, look at Izotope’s Spire Studio - it’s free. Honestly, none of them are hard in a basic sense to do basic recording. Basic mix techniques can make mixing pretty easy when you only have a few tracks. As you learn, you can get very complex with signal chains and plugins. If you have a good ear for live, just make it sound like that when you mix. Use your ears.

    Many plugins replicate the analog knobs interface. Use those plugins if that’s what you like. An EQ with a spectrum analyzer can be a big help although the old analog interface is fine - usually there are presets that will get you close, and you can twist knobs until you like the sound.

    above all, find someone who can mentor you. Just like playing, it Really helps to have someone a little further down the road from you.

    worth repeating, it’s not that hard, just something new and different to learn. You won’t harm any guitars in the process :)
     
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  15. kristen

    kristen TDPRI Member

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    Recording in either Logic or Garage Band (with or without "loop goodies") , or Reaper.
    Final Mixing in Reaper.
    Mastering in ....... the jury's out on that one.
     
  16. Disco Biscuits

    Disco Biscuits Tele-Meister

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    I've been reading as much as I can on this stuff for the last 6 months. My recording experience doesn't exist outside of field microphones for whole band recordings, looping, and I-phone video/audio (reads: 0 experience whatsoever). I've been hesitant on jumping in, just by the sheer plethora of options. Thought about hiring someone to come set all the stuff up and give me a tutorial. I sound like my grandfather right now, asking me to come help him program his VCR.
     
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  17. Rev Rhythm

    Rev Rhythm Tele-Holic

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    You don't need to hire anyone. Youtube has great, in depth tutorials on how to use most of the DAWs.
     
  18. Shawn B

    Shawn B TDPRI Member

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    I used Cakewalk/Sonar for years, then didn't record for almost 10 years. Jumped back in around 6 months ago (gee, wonder where I found all that time, all of a sudden), and I downloaded both Reaper and the "sorta new" Cakewalk by BandLab. I ran them parallel for a while, but found myself mostly using Cakewalk. The main issue I experience is with live monitoring/latency when adding iZotope plugins. I can all all sorts of other plugins/virtual instruments with no latency issues, but man... I stick Ozone or Nectar on a track, and man... input latency feels like it jumps up to ~350ms, and I get a lot of "crackles" during playback. I'll likely dive deeper into Reaper when I have the time, but I can't really complain about Cakewalk, and it was free...
     
  19. thinling

    thinling Tele-Meister

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    I actually think Pro Tools is the easiest, though it’s not getting mentioned much here. It’s pretty much like using a tape machine and a mixing desk. I’ve even started using their free version on my laptop, as I can use it quickly whenever I don’t have my iLok full of plugins. (You do have to keep renaming the Plugin folder if you have both Pro Tools and Pro Tools First installed and want to open it quickly).
    The free version is called Pro Tools|First. It limits the track count and has only a few plugins but they’re all good and cover the basics. They just added UVI Workstation which gives you lots of synths.
    I have Reaper and Mixbus-32 too and find Reaper less intuitive, and Mixbus a bit limiting though it does sound good. I sometimes open up Ableton Live Lite and am baffled by it.
     
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  20. psikes

    psikes TDPRI Member

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    Another vote for reaper, hard to beat at any price.
     
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