What is it with so much modern music

Zoso420

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I think it's because most school music programs have been defunded. Kids don't know how to write an advanced chord progression. Rick Beato has a couple good vids on how dumbed down modern pop hits are. Also we can go into how record companies aren't making near as much money as they used to. A good thing in my book but the downside is there isn't a budget to hire pro studio musicians anymore.
 

suthol

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I think it's because most school music programs have been defunded. Kids don't know how to write an advanced chord progression.

I think it's because most school music programs have been defunded. Kids don't know how to write an advanced chord progression.

This, at high school I studied classical music theory and composition as a certificate subject which I passed but have no forgotten as I have with most of the higher level maths from back then.

My granddaughter did music as an optional subject last year ( yr 8 ) and where we had to write and play difficult stuff all she was taught was the Smoke On The Water riff and even that was wrong
 

codamedia

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Take an honest look at music over the decades....
5% - 10% becomes timeless, or at least has longevity. The other 90% - 95% is drivel... popular in it's day, but that's it!

There is still a lot of great music coming out today.
 

DjimiWrey

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generational complaint?
my grands music bores the heck out of me
just like "my" music bores the heck out of my grands

i don't even know the clarion call(s) for the last 3 generat"ions
what are they "for" or "against"?
there's ALWAYS gonna be the "oh ain't my baby fine" and "my hearts been squashed"
i did enjoy the protest songs from "woody guthrie" thru "neutral milk hotel"

i suspect that music will not be as appreciated since it's become so generic and common.
we could listen 24/7/365 and still never get to hear a lot of the genius creativity happening at this very moment in time... oh well.. glad i still have my old records (yes, cds are records)
 
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loopfinding

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How many complaints does this board see re "today's music" that are based on Spotify's 'charts' or whatever's on FM?

For the first time in history, the world's music is open to all of us and there's more out there than what's commonly considered popular in your country. Explore.

i think it's okay to complain about modern music if you have at least some idea about what's genuinely new and going right in your opinion. and always gotta make some concessions to stuff you don't like but still recognize that it demands some respect. agree that you can just go explore nowadays, but often times people who do explore just want to find something that is "new" but basically exactly the same old same old.

e.g. i don't know why i would go looking for old style country or r&b that's accurate to a tee when i can just listen to 1000s of old records that do it better. not that there's anything wrong with playing "genre" music, but i guess i'd rather see something like that live and don't really need to listen to new recordings of it.
 
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buster poser

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i think it's okay to complain about modern music if you have at least some idea about what's genuinely new and going right in your opinion. and always gotta make some concessions to stuff you don't like but still recognize that it demands some respect. agree that you can just go explore nowadays, but often times people who do explore just want to find something that is "new" but basically exactly the same old same old.

e.g. i don't know why i would go looking for old style country or r&b that's accurate to a tee when i can just listen to 1000s of old records that do it better. not that there's anything wrong with playing "genre" music, but i guess i'd rather see something like that live and don't really need to listen to new recordings of it.
Totally fair. I just see it so often as "kids' music these days with the auto-tune booo" like that hasn't been a thing since the mid 90s (Cher, Mould, on and on). Just feels like a broad conclusion is often drawn from narrow datasets.

I hear you on genre stuff; it's a mixed bag like everything, though I think a good bit of it's not really trying to sound just like the old stuff, or at least the stuff I like doesn't... Charlie Crockett (country), Delvon Lamarr (soul/R&B), funk (Vulfpeck), etc.
 

SixStringSlinger

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i think it's okay to complain about modern music if you have at least some idea about what's genuinely new and going right in your opinion.

Just look at the post above talking about bassists on rap songs having the easiest jobs :lol: I mean, there's a spectrum, as with anything, but what little hip hop I'm familiar with has some of the best bass playing I've ever heard. Guess what, guys? It's not all stolen or sampled. A lot of it is live and original :eek:

I wonder how many people with that attitude would turn around and defend the bass on "Runnin' With the Devil" with a "Hey, he was just playing what the song needed, maannnn"
 

loopfinding

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Totally fair. I just see it so often as "kids' music these days with the auto-tune booo" like that hasn't been a thing since the mid 90s (Cher, Mould, on and on). Just feels like a broad conclusion is often drawn from narrow datasets.

true yeah, and the thing that rubs me wrong about that is like, you show people something that is not any of that, but also not led zeppelin, the beatles, or otis redding, or even nirvana, and they still go "it's crap." okay, so what you're telling me is you just fear change, it wasn't about the autotune or songwriting, that was just an excuse.
 

JIMMY JAZZMAN

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I agree but at least with all this tech, I can go to the 50's and 60's stuff, including rock and roll, jazz, hard bop
and folk, and be thankful for the great music I was fortunate to grow up with, in a couple of keystrokes.
I still play and I love it, but the "new music" except for some "jazz" that's out there now, isn't "ear candy"...
Now, all of you can get off my lawn......ha, ha..
 

arlum

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So many of the modern "songs" seem to sit on a single chord with an insistent thumping beat and a line or two of nonsensical lyrics heavily processed through a vocoder.

This is so the band can manage to play it live on stage without sounding too different from the studio version they released. Bands are a lot smarter today. Why trouble yourself developing songs requiring daily practice and a high level of skill. The current listeners might just get pissed off that all those notes and melody and offbeats are detracting from the deep message the poet / rapper / singer is trying to get across to his flock. In your example the guitarist needs to master one chord. The singer(?) has few lyrics to memorize. A meth head can thump with the best of them.

Why make a masterpiece for a few appreciative listeners that earns you maybe a hundred grand with a lot of smaller venue touring mainly to older folks who could possibly throw out a hip if you over stimulated them when, instead, you can talk crap, play one 5 chord over and over, (in a masterful way using the time honored techniques of palm muting, string deadening, pick scrapes and random harmonics), and hire a drummer who's perfected the ancient art of rocking his ankle in that secret way that makes the stick thingy with the ball on the end strike a bass drum in a really thumpy, (sorry .... extra really cool thumpy), way and then perform in front of a wild and crazy bunch willing to pay ridiculous ticket prices to hear a massage set to music(?) they could have heard on a street corner for free.
 

kilroy6262

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It's cos we're all old. New artists have just as much musical talent as ever, but it's being expressed in different ways to catch the Tiktok, Instagram, Snapchat, etc. generation, where if you don't get to the chorus in the first 30 seconds, you don't get plays.
...........

"New artists have just as much musical talent as ever, but it's not being expressed because record labels still control mass consumption music, and they are worse than ever."

Certainly a generation wasn't born without musical talent, but, where is it? It used to be that labels looked for 80% of their artists to produce marketable drivel, bringing in the $, with the other 20% being risky investments in high talent artists that may or may not sell well. Now it's just 100% drivel. Can you imagine early Pink Floyd, Yes or Genesis getting a record deal today?
 

Vermoulian

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The current low state of modern pop is due, I'll hypothesize, to how the music business has evolved.

Back in the early days of records and radio, musicians made music and the record companies recorded it and sold it, choosing artists by who was popular already. It didn't take long for stables of songwriters to emerge creating songs for singers chosen for their looks, but while as somebody said above lots of dreck was generated, I think that most of those people took seriously the craft of songwriting and were trying to write good songs. And, even long after such things arose a lot of recording artists (especially in genres like rock) still came from the old route of, become popular in your area and get signed to record the stuff you've created.

But dealing with "artists" has always presented headaches to record companies. They want to record non-commercial songs; they don't want to do things that will sell more records, based on their artistic vision; they break up their bands at inconvenient times; they change their style or approach mid-contract. Over the last few decades, the music industry has figured out how to make a lot of money without having to deal with these issues.

They have studied the market and have figured out how to crank out songs that check certain boxes to give them a good shot at being popular with the unsophisticated masses, and they hire performers who are entirely created for the sole purpose of delivering those low-denominator songs to various demographics. Such songs rarely reach the levels of success and popularity of great songs by great artists, but they are lower-risk and much less troublesome to crank out. Add to that the fact that so many are written by a pretty small number of songwriters and that it's quite possible to produce a hit single with no live musicians playing on it, and it becomes an easy choice.

As noted, songwriters and house bands employed by record labels and production companies are nothing new. But I think there's a distinct difference that sets the modern paradigm apart from the world of the Brill Building and the Wrecking Crew. I think that the people involved at that time were trying to do what they were doing as well as they could, subject to the pressures of deadlines and producer directives. Today, I think the people behind a lot of pop music are making it with contempt for the people at whom it is aimed. They know it's trite crap; they're okay with it being trite crap because their mission statement was to produce trite crap.

Of course there are still bands that achieve success following the old route, but there are a lot fewer of them. There's now a big gulf between top-40 pop and music made by actual musicians with any sort of artistic intent. Whenever a topic like this comes up people always pipe up to say that there is plenty of great music out there right now, and that's true, but you won't hear it on the radio and you generally have to do some work to find it. You can't rely on it floating to the top and gaining wider popularity based on merit.
 

BorderRadio

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Take an honest look at music over the decades....
5% - 10% becomes timeless, or at least has longevity. The other 90% - 95% is drivel... popular in it's day, but that's it!

There is still a lot of great music coming out today.

Let’s not exclude variations and personal preference. Of that 10 percent of so-called great music, some regard it as cliche trash. I’d never trust this forums majority idea of ‘drivel’, it would cramp my style and be zero fun. Call me unsophisticated.

I’m really happy and thankful for modern music. Leo forbid I have to listen to the same guitar rote all the time.
 




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