What is it with all these tribute bands?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Dreadnut, Feb 21, 2020.

  1. Jerry_Mountains

    Jerry_Mountains Tele-Meister

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    Well there's a big market for classic rock, people of all ages wants to see rock n roll acts but the reality is that the newest bands are really not that good or not that influential they are classic just in sound but not no new band is a classic... I don't know if I'm explaining myself. So, bands started to cover (no pun intented) that niche in order to put some money in the bank.

    It like... I want a Ford Mustang, the good ones are '65 to '68 (IMO), but they are rare to find and expensive... Imagine if someone started to making copies or "tributes" of that cars at a competitive price, I'll snatch one in no time!
     
  2. Dismalhead

    Dismalhead Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm kinda hurting for money since my divorce and I'm starting to entertain the idea of actually playing for money as a part-time job, and if a tribute band makes money I may go that route. Never say never man.

    Always did think it was kinda weird though.
     
  3. kookaburra

    kookaburra Tele-Afflicted

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    :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:
     
  4. Tonetele

    Tonetele Poster Extraordinaire

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    C'mon - it's the money.
    My city has a band that sounds and looks like The Police- but they get work. The guitarist even has a Fender Custom shop Telecaster ala Andy Summers.
    Also, here is a band that emulates Led Zepplin so well that they have played a series of shows with the London Philharmonic Orchestra at Royal Albert Hall. They do it because they like that band and , if good enough, they get work.
     
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  5. radiocaster

    radiocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I think it's a different phenomenon, not really part of the current tribute act thing, and the GD inspired bands have been around for a long time.

    I would say it's just a bunch of Deadheads doing what they like. Sure the guy with the beard is kind of like Jerry, but I don't think Jerry ever wore a Clash t-shirt, despite both bands liking reggae and playing "I Fought the Law".

    I also don't think joke bands are tribute bands, any more than Weird Al being a regular cover band act.

    Sure, there were a few tribute acts even in the 80s and 90s and even before, but they were more of an oddity than the rule. I think even the Elvis impersonator scene was kind of like that. There were a couple of older Doors tributes too.

    (edit: forgot about the Bootles and other Beatles clones. In any case, the idea of a tribute band of any band wasn't as common back then.)
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2020
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  6. dan1952

    dan1952 Friend of Leo's

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    Why is a tribute band so bad?
     
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  7. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    Why do you want to go see an imitation of something? Why would you want to spend your musical life trying to copy someone else as closely as possible?

    I simply don't get it. You'd have to pay me, a lot, to go to a tribute band show, and it's hard for me to imagine the amount of money you'd have to pay me to play in a tribute band.

    For the audience: the pathetic timidity of it: the stuck in the past lack of imagination, to prefer a copy of the orginal to the real ting, or to prefer yet another version of the songs you play over and over at home in a live setting rather than Oh no! exposing yourself to actual new music! New music is terrible! quick, let me put the Eagles greatest hit on again.

    And for the player, think about it--you spend x number of years learning to play well enough to execute the exact solo of some boomer hero or other. Let's say gilmour. And there you go, every gig, playing the exact solo. Who in the world would want that? You're good enough to make music on your own, but there you are being the human equivalent of a CD.

    Let's say you don't play exactly the same solo. You play in exactly the same style, so the sort of people who like tribute bands won't be upset by the possibility of actual originality happening. It's almost as bad.

    We all learn by imitation, but surely the goal is to get to a point where you're not just imitating?

    I just find the whole tribute band completely ridiculous. People love it, but people love all sorts of stuff I don't get, and I'm sure I love stuff that other people don't get. But you asked, so I'm offering an answer.
     
  8. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I think it would be fun to be in a rotating tribute band, 4 sets each one a different tribute, different sets each week. A cover band is basically a tribute band that does this song by song.

    You can still work a set of originals in and make money. The majority of bands that are being tributed started out like that.
     
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  9. muchxs

    muchxs Doctor of Teleocity

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    I was solidly in the first wave Punk scene during what I viewed as the waning years of The Dead. Lived through the entire hippy movement.

    My take on the hippy movement?

    They said,

    "Let's all pull together."

    Guys like me did all the pulling while a buncha glue sniffers rode free.

    :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

    I figure I'll put together a crushing loud set for the next (dance like a) Hippy Fest. Last one I went to was a G.G. Allin Revival backstage.



     
  10. Fearnot

    Fearnot Friend of Leo's

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    When I first started playing, I couldn't see myself in a band until I saw there was a local scene for original bands. Then I jumped in the deep end. The idea of playing night after night, doing nothing but imitating other bands was completely disheartening to me then.

    Guess what... it still is.

    I'm in a band these days that does covers (mostly) but we do them our way, messing them up as best we can. It's a lot of fun and sometime we even make a little money. Woot! But I really miss the originals scene we had here all through the 80s & 90s. That was the best work I ever did.
     
  11. 1293

    1293 Poster Extraordinaire

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    There was a local group that did '80s hair band covers. Aquanet. Best band name ever.
     
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  12. radiocaster

    radiocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    So you don't like what many hippies turned out to be?

    Was punk any better? Punks generally turned out to be either corporates or into begging for beer and heroin fest.
     
  13. radiocaster

    radiocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    double posting annoyance
     
  14. muchxs

    muchxs Doctor of Teleocity

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    I turned out pretty good, considering.
     
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  15. muchxs

    muchxs Doctor of Teleocity

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    OMG! A car analogy!

    :) :) :)

    '60s Mustangs are crap. Crap suspension, crap brakes, crap handling, they came with crap tires, crap carburetors, points, distributor cap, valves that sink into the cast iron heads in 20,000 miles on unleaded gas.

    People who weren't there forget these things wouldn't start, wouldn't stop and they needed a "valve job" before they hit 100k, that's when we could still get leaded regular at the pump.

    We sentimentally overlook the fact that they rusted out almost as quick as their quarter mile elapsed time, maybe as fast as fourteen seconds flat.

    :lol: :lol: :lol:

    Imagine if Ford started making copies of their old Mustangs. Oh, wait. They already do.

    Chrysler makes neo- vintage Chryslers and Chevy makes a neo- vintage Camaro.

    I'd be really, really happy if they came with drum brakes, bias ply tires, cast iron V8s with "carbon daters" (carburetors)...



    I'm pretty sure seat belts were only options in '65.

    I remember burning my bare feet in my uncle's '70 Mach 1. The seat belt mounting hardware conducted the heat from the exhaust system providing burning hot spots above the carpet.

    Later, I designed heat shielding products to address that problem for another Detroit OEM.

    "Hazard" lights came in '66.

    Rims with "safety beads" to run tubeless tires came in '68.

    Those old Mustangs came with leaf spring rear suspension. Guy who were hip to it ran slapper bars aka "traction bars" to keep from wrapping the leaf springs under hard acceleration and breaking leaves right and left.

    Didn't take much to smoke those skinny bias ply tires. The base straight six and the three on the tree in the '65 would do it.
     
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  16. Bruxist

    Bruxist Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Interesting timing of this thread as I am going to a Pink Floyd tribute show tonight with a friend of mine from high school and his son. His friend from college is playing guitar with them (he used to just play sax).

    I am looking forward to it! I love Pink Floyd (more than pretty much than any other band likely to have a tribute, though the Doors would be cool with a good singer and keyboardist) and there is no way to see the classic lineup. (I saw Roger Waters in 1999 and it was awesome)

    They are playing at a big venue so I expect it pays well.

    I don't think I would go over and over but I think seeing a tribute show once sounds like fun.

    We will see if my opinion is different tomorrow.
     
  17. Ignatius

    Ignatius Tele-Afflicted

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    There's a local music hall/theatre near me and the house band (a loose collective of local musicians) performs tribute shows ever month or two. The odd thing is that they all use music stands. I don't know if I have a strong position on tribute bands one way or the other, but there's something VERY odd about seeing a Led Zeppelin or Stones tribute with music stands lining the front of the stage :D. They even did a metal show and the singer had a music stand. I dunno - just seems kinda weird to me in those genres, especially when it's a "show" type of gig with a ticket-paying audience.

    About the only tribute act I'd be interested in being involved with is a Steely Dan tribute.
     
  18. Controller

    Controller Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    This is kind of mind trip. Covers, tribute, what's the difference? I went to see a couple of Beatles tribute groups. I know the music very well and they did a great job. More cost effective than seeing Paul McCartney live at $175/ticket. The irony is I am used to hearing Paul McCartney of the 1960s. The tribute band is closer to Paul McCartney of the 1960s than Paul McCartney in 2020 doing covers of Paul McCartney in the 1960s even though he is the same person, kind of.

    Ok, things are spinning around at this point....
     
  19. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    it means the people need traditions
     
  20. scottser

    scottser Friend of Leo's

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    I'm neither rich enough nor talented enough to be a music snob. If someone offered me a tribute band gig, I'd take it in a heartbeat. Having said that I wouldn't be arsed ever going to see a tribute band personally.
     
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