What effect is used on this song? I Got A Line On You by Spirit

jguitarman

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Oct 14, 2003
Posts
1,822
Age
66
Location
No CA
The solo comes in at about the 1 minute mile marker.

I'm thinking a Chorus or Phaser and am experimenting with those but would appreciate others' input.
Help me nail this. I have the guitar parts down but could use help with the effect(s).



Thanks
 

nojazzhere

Doctor of Teleocity
Ad Free Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2017
Posts
18,070
Age
70
Location
Foat Wuth, Texas
The solo comes in at about the 1 minute mile marker.

I'm thinking a Chorus or Phaser and am experimenting with those but would appreciate others' input.
Help me nail this. I have the guitar parts down but could use help with the effect(s).



Thanks

I agree that it's likely just the double-tracked guitar solo.....but will add Randy California was an early user of certain effects when he played live, particularly an echo unit, likely an EchoPlex. He had something that gave him extreme sustain, as well. I saw Spirit once at Panther Hall here in Ft Worth. He was using Acoustic amps. He had a speaker cab way off to the left of the stage, on what was essentially a balcony. Several times he would have a sustained note going, and then "pan" back and forth between his onstage speakers and that extension speaker. He was a very innovative guitarist.....gone far too young. :(
 

Ed Driscoll

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Posts
2,121
Location
South of Dallas
What effects were available in 1968? Not much besides fuzz and Uni-Vibe.
I'm not that into effects, but I'm not really hearing anything.

As others have noted, the Spirit solo is likely manually double-tracked. At about the 1:20 mark, the two guitars start playing slightly different lines.

That said, while there weren't many different pedals effects for guitarists in 1968, lots of mostly time-based effects were available in the recording studio by then -- the first record to really featuring flanging was likely Toni Fisher's "The Big Hurt" from 1959:



Engineer Ken Townsend had invented ADT (Automatic/Artificial Double Tracking) at EMI's Abbey Road studios in 1966 by lashing up an extra tap recorder while mixing down. The following year, after the Beatles recorded "All You Need is Love" at Olympic Studios, George Martin asked them to add ADT to John Lennon's voice. When Olympic's engineers were embarrassed about initially not knowing how to do this, they went off and stumbled onto their own flanging techniques on such tracks as the Small Faces' "Itchycoo Park" and Jimi Hendrix's "Axis: Bold as Love."
 
Last edited:

KokoTele

Doctor of Teleocity
Vendor Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2003
Posts
14,657
Age
46
Location
albany, ny [not chicago]
I definitely hear a fast chorusing effect, particularly on the high notes in that solo. I don't think double tracking by itself would do this.

I think you could create this effect by running the second guitar track through a Leslie. Mabe just the high frequency horns.
 

codamedia

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Apr 4, 2009
Posts
5,970
Location
Western Canada
I agree with @KokoTele .... there is definitely an effect applied beyond the double track. It's pretty obvious at the start of the solo just after the 1 minute mark. Given the time period, I suspect at least of the guitars was run through a Leslie. If the univibe (or similar) existed at the time, it could be that.


Using modern effects I'd reach for a rotary/vibe variant.
 




Top