What Does the Title ‘Esquire’ Mean, Anyway?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Lotek, Feb 5, 2021.

  1. Lotek

    Lotek Tele-Meister

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  2. Peegoo

    Peegoo Doctor of Teleocity

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    I think attorneys adopted the title because they went to school just like doctors did, but unfairly didn't have the "M.D." to append to their names. Elitist mumbo-jumbo, methinks.
     
  3. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Fascinating! When I lived in the UK, my bank statements referred to me as BDLH, Esq. I have no idea why the bank added that. I am not anything like a lawyer. I thought it was just something British banks liked to do.
     
  4. That Cal Webway

    That Cal Webway Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    It's a magazine baby it's a magazine!!
     
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  5. scelestus

    scelestus Tele-Holic

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    Peegoo is onto something here but it's beyond the JD - in attorney-land, it's only acceptable if you've actually gotten licensed and should only be used in certain contexts (like you're not supposed to refer to yourself as "Esquire").
     
  6. regularslinky

    regularslinky Tele-Afflicted

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    I'm a lawyer. "Esquire" is an English relic. It's never used verbally, just in writing to denote that a person is a lawyer. There are things in court that require a lawyer's signature, and using "Esquire" or "Esq." is an easy way to indicate that.

    Lawyers have Juris Doctor degrees, so I guess we could use J.D. after our names, or "Dr." if we really wanted to. Practices are different in other countries. I've had clients from Central America call me "doctor."

    In court, I'm either "Mr. Barron" or "Counselor."
    At home, I'm "Daddy" or "Dear" or "Jerkface."
    At band practice I'm "Too Damn Loud."
     
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  7. electrichead

    electrichead Tele-Holic

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    My stepdad was a retired Col. in the army and then got his Doctorate in political science and he threw that word Dr. around like a baseball.:rolleyes:

    Surprisingly enough in many cases it worked..:cool:

    Once you got to know him he was actually a pretty big bonehead.:D
     
  8. notmyusualuserid

    notmyusualuserid Friend of Leo's

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    ^Maybe in America.

    In the UK (actually in England originally), Esquire was a courtesy title used to address sons of the gentry who had no other title.

    It was a cut above plain Mister, but conferred no other rank.
     
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  9. Alcee

    Alcee TDPRI Member

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    An esquire is a knight in training.

    So a Fender Esquire is a Telecaster in training?
     
  10. Blues Twanger

    Blues Twanger Tele-Afflicted

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    My ex has a JD, I tell people my ex is both a lawyer and a doctor.
     
  11. Dan German

    Dan German Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    At a Denver car lot I used to work at, we had a client who rather insisted on being called "Dr. _____". If you said "Mister" he would correct you. His cheques said "Dr. _____" as well. He had a doctorate in engineering. I'm not saying he wasn't a "doctor" but it's not commonly used to refer to engineers in North America, and there's a difference between having a title and demanding a title.
     
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  12. tomkatf

    tomkatf Tele-Afflicted Platinum Supporter

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    I've always preferred being referred to as "Master" tomkatf... Isn't a knight in training or a knight's assistant a Squire?
     
  13. Killing Floor

    Killing Floor Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    !!! Atlas Obscura is one of the best parts of my day.

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  14. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    When we had cases in Mississippi or with Mississippi counsel, I had to train the staff to address them as "Hon." on all the correspondence. I used to tease one of my partners, that the reason he went to Ole Miss Law School and accepted so many Mississippi cases, was he liked to open his mail addressed to "Hon." (Honorable).

    Btw, we put "Esq." all over the place - even if reference to ourselves. Just because of convention - not to pull rank on anyone. And I remember one local guy, who had been both a judge and Governor before returning to law practice and he preferred "Judge". Once a judge, always a judge I think.
     
  15. Steerforth

    Steerforth Friend of Leo's

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    Esquire, in modern parlance, means, “Get out your wallet, this is going to hurt!”
     
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  16. blue17

    blue17 Tele-Meister

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    Living in DC where about 40% of the population has JDs, you tend to see the Esq. on someone's name more often than not if they are not practicing law, but rather doing something else and wanting to show off the degree.
     
  17. beninma

    beninma Friend of Leo's

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    This article is very interesting.. good find.

    I work in engineering.. I've been surrounded by people who who had Phds by entire career who went by Dr.

    I do not get the whole anti-intellectual gatekeeping around only trying to call M.Ds by Dr. It doesn't make any sense. Especially in Academia we called professors by Dr, and I never took a single class with a professor who was an M.D. because I studied Computer Science.

    Heck my Math teacher my last 2 years of High School was a Math PhD and no one ever called him Mr, ever.

    My sister has a Ph. D in Biology, but not an MD. Until very recently she was a professor at a medical school teaching MDs. How would you not call someone like that Dr.??

    I thought there was a side aspect of Esquire also being used just to denote a man who was not married.
     
  18. mahlamoilanen

    mahlamoilanen TDPRI Member

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    To me it means this.
    Got it today. CS ’59 Journeyman relic 2018 with tele conversion kit. Nice chocolate burst. Big neck.
     

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  19. Throttleneck

    Throttleneck Tele-Afflicted

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    The term Dr. for Ph.Ds long predates the usage by Physicians.

    I have two Ph.D.s and prefer to be called Dr. Dr. Or Dr squared. Either will do.

    :)
     
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  20. 985plowboy

    985plowboy Poster Extraordinaire

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    I grew up down the road from an old hobo dude. He lived in a shack that I’m pretty sure he was squatting on. He never held a job other than the odd afternoon helping out someone in the neighborhood for a few bucks for some white port wine and a pack of Winston smokes.
    I used to love to sit on his porch and let him tell me stories.
    His imagination was boundless.
    No, he did not play guitar.
    Everyone referred to him as
    Bernel Fontaine Esquire.
    As a kid I thought that was his last name.
     
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