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What does Punk mean to you?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by offsideref, Oct 23, 2020.

  1. jhundt

    jhundt Doctor of Teleocity

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    I can't read all of the responses, so sorry if I repeat things said above.

    I was there - London 1976. The movement was palpable, and inspiring at gut-level. I was already playing guitar. My band was covering the MC5, Alice Cooper, and similar. But that summer, it all broke loose.

    I read the MM and the NME, I heard all this talk about the Pistols and the Damned. I went on a long tube ride to see the Pistols, and the show was cancelled when I got there. Another night they played London at the 100, but I stopped at the Marquee to see a fellow Californian (Pat Travers) and missed one og history's great performances!

    I was able to see the Damned when they opened for the Runaways and the Troggs at the Chalk Farm Roundhouse - possibly the first serious opening-act gig for a UK punk band.

    But the records - that's what I remember. The race was on to put out the first record. Pre-punk/post-"pub-rock" groups like Eddie and the Hot Rods were releasing self-produced 45's and EP's. Who was gonna be the first punk group to do so?

    The Damned released New Rose. I bought it the day it came out, from a street-coener vendor. I took it home to Finsbury Park, put it on the little record player - and it blew my mind!

    Not many days thereafter, then Sex Pistols released "Anarchy in the UK" which I also bought the day of release. And again - the intro, the performance - it just was unbelievably powerful.

    Soon after that, I went back to California, carrying all this in my head. It changed my life completely. And it changed the life of my then-never-expected son, who is now 35 and grew up listening to those old records of mine.

    In fact, I got tired of punk pretty quick, because it became more of a fashion movement. But I love the old records.
     
  2. buster poser

    buster poser Friend of Leo's Platinum Supporter

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    Mostly true, but similar to Malcolm Young's rhythm work, there's more skill required than most people think to play it *right*. Great lesson with Adrian and this classic...

     
  3. notmyusualuserid

    notmyusualuserid Friend of Leo's

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    I know what it means, but if you're going to use the word that loosely any (insert genre) band could be called punk's progenitor.
     
  4. mexicanyella

    mexicanyella Friend of Leo's

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    In the late 80s I had two college roommates who played in a punk band. The guitarist liked Black Flag and Naked Raygun and the Dead Kennedys and Minor Threat, and also Van Halen and Rush. He had a 100-watt Marshall MOSFET half stack and a couple of Kahler-equipped early Ibanez Roadstars in our dorm room. I thought that was rad. I was coming from a Country- and classic rock-radio-listening background and just starting to play guitar. All that wild-ass dissonant music was weird at first but overall, it showed me that you have to pick the thing up and play it and find your thing. That was a pretty fun time. I never got as “out there” as those guys, musically, but a few years later I was playing guitar in my own band, and those guys and their musical attitudes helped put me there.

    I remember those guys giving me a compilation tape called “Let Them Eat Jellybeans” to listen to to kind of get my music appreciation together.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Let_Them_Eat_Jellybeans!

    There was a song on it called “Slave to my d—k.” Wow! Are they really singing that? These guys are fun! Not much like, you know, Kenny Rogers’ “Lady,” or Joe Satriani’s “Surfing With the Alien.”
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2020
  5. bottlenecker

    bottlenecker Friend of Leo's

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    "It's everything punk was rebelling against."

    Worst quote of this thread, probably.

    I can't read all this, but has anyone said "if that's not punk, I don't know what is" yet, right after giving an example that clearly demonstrates they don't know what is?
     
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  6. bottlenecker

    bottlenecker Friend of Leo's

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    The british bands made more waves because they were more commercial and marketed. The american bands, except for the ramones, were purposefully less so. In american punk scenes, the guys with the sex pistols costumes were often seen as the kooks who just got into it. Not that people didn't listen to british bands, but they weren't seen as more important. What was great about punk was that it could offer less mainstream options, not just a new fashion to follow.
     
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  7. gimmeatele

    gimmeatele Tele-Afflicted

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    I was there in 1977, saw all the bands except the pistols, had some fun then it went south as trends, fashions call it what you will, tend to do.
    Never bought into the punk for life think, it was about change and it succeeded in changing the then music scene, but was it for the better?

    Still love the music as it was my teenage years, good times, but like punk wanted I changed in the end, I may still have a 'punk's attitude, it certainly awakened my political ideas and thinking and that has carried on through my adult life, so I can thank it for that.
    As for punk now, no idea, it will always be 1977 to 81 for me.
     
  8. Ghostdriver

    Ghostdriver Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    I don’t think British bands were more commercial at all, ‘punk’ was a hyped up movement in the end generated by bad press and a swear word on a teatime tv show that made punk out to be a disgusting threat to the population......that’s why punk became ‘famous’ !
    punk was introduced to London by Malcolm McLaren after his visit to NY, he tried and succeeded in creating a ‘scene’. The American bands like Television happened to be lumped into the scene, but I wouldn’t say they were talentless musicians, and Robert Quine from the Voidoids, hardly A poor guitarist, in fact quite the contrary.
     
  9. Wildeman

    Wildeman Tele-Meister

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    Screenshot_2020-10-23-10-49-26-1.png
     
  10. bottlenecker

    bottlenecker Friend of Leo's

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    No I don't think they were talentless at all. Television and Richard Hell and Voidoids were great bands, and made great music.
    Maybe it's a cultural disconnect on my part, but the Sex Pistols seemed more about a surface level sensationalism, which I percieve as more commercial. It certainly sold records.
     
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  11. jhundt

    jhundt Doctor of Teleocity

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    East Bay Ray .... if you think that's punk well, OK. That's why punk was good for a year or two.
     
  12. Uncle Daddy

    Uncle Daddy Tele-Afflicted

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    I notice CrAss has yet not got a mention.

     
  13. secretsoundz

    secretsoundz TDPRI Member

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    Basically, The Clash
     
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  14. johnny k

    johnny k Poster Extraordinaire

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    I love that 1st album. Some very cool stuffs on the guitar.
     
  15. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    To me? My impressions are far, far away. It came, it stayed for a while, it left. I watched it come and go, like a lot of other things.

    Funny and sad at the same time to observe the attitude comparisons, the yardsticks:

    Quien es mas macho? This is, this isn’t; the only rule is no rules

    I liked the idea of it more than the actual music. The relief of a new retro in contrast to the empty vacuum that was Disco and the bloated limited liability shoals of corpulent corporate rock machines.

    Like the best, needed to be experienced live and loud. Recordings are just a tool of the consumption industry.

    Like a sad little cartoon of a Hindu epic involving Shiva, the Destroyer.

    The apprehension of success is also the crucible of destruction. And that destruction leaves the space for a new cycle of creation. Something created out of the void, idealized then, at the moment it is idolized, along come the Rudra and the Marutas, and your mosh pit looks like cub scouts.

    But yeah, fun while it lasted. Look it all the things that changed in its wake.

    Aren’t you glad you asked?
     
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  16. teletail

    teletail Tele-Afflicted

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    Punk is where you assert your individuality by dressing exactly like every other punk.
     
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  17. Danb541

    Danb541 Tele-Afflicted

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    What does punk mean to me?
    No guitar solos
     
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  18. aging_rocker

    aging_rocker Tele-Afflicted

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    Punk, in the UK at least, lasted for about 9 months before it was 'monetised' and packaged by the business world. By the time most folks were aware of it, it was already over. I refer to 1976. I was there.

    The music was the soundtrack, but the attitude was all about rejecting the 'values' of what we were handed by the previous generation - prog, passivity, commercialisation of the 'counterculture'. Getting clothes from charity shops, hacking off your hair yourself, making your own music and entertainment, living for the day (because hey, we could all die tomorrow) and generally not playing the game with regards to consumerism were big ideological drivers. Poverty and lack of adequate housing forced us into squats.
    It went from wearing dead mens ill-fitting suits, held together with pins and rivets, to 'posh' kids buying 'bondage trousers' in the high street almost overnight. Revolution became pantomime.
    We thought it was a real revolution, we were 16/17 and didn't know any better.
     
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  19. Toast

    Toast Tele-Afflicted

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    I haven't read through the thread.

    Things I like(d) about a lot of punk:
    Irony
    A contempt for knee-jerk sentimentality
    No juvenile, religious, 666, judeo-christian moron magnet motifs
    Political critiques
    Justified rage

    The thing I hate most about punk? My own unjustified sense of elitism.
     
  20. buster poser

    buster poser Friend of Leo's Platinum Supporter

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    Okay, this is what punk means to me. And what it felt like when I first heard Anarchy in the UK, this age, still way into Rush, and then BAM.

    (some language herein)

     
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