1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

What Do You Play When the Song Hits a Minor?

Discussion in 'The BASS Place' started by Tele-beeb, Oct 28, 2020.

  1. Tele-beeb

    Tele-beeb Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,680
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2012
    Location:
    The Bluegrass
    I’m (still) new at bass and I’m too old to learn or understand theory.
    I realize in any given there is a given number of minor chords. It seems, that it’s when the song goes minor that bad notes happen.
    So... experienced players, what shape (or other) do you do when you hit the minor chord?
    Thanks.
     
  2. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,463
    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2011
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    This is a confusing post.

    When the song goes minor bad notes happen? What does that mean?

    What shape (or other) do we do when we hit the minor chord? What does that mean?
     
    Tele-beeb likes this.
  3. Tele-beeb

    Tele-beeb Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,680
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2012
    Location:
    The Bluegrass
    Well... like, you’re playing along, then the same shape doesn’t work for the minor chord...
    I can use the same shape for whatever major chord... but, not the minor.
    A box seems to work? But, I’m fishing for a better way. I know just enough to be dangerous (as the saying goes... not really dangerous.)
     
  4. Doorlord

    Doorlord Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    500
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2010
    Location:
    San Dimas
    as a rule I stay away from minors, at least since my 18th birthday
     
  5. Paulie_Boy

    Paulie_Boy Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    Age:
    62
    Posts:
    693
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2019
    Location:
    Varies. (Witness Protection)
    Shouldn't matter much to a non-walking bass player. You're laying down the root and 5th, which are the same for major, minor and dominant chords. The notes that define the major, minor or dominant tonality belong to the guitarist. (Guide Tones 3rd, b3rd, 7th, b7th) The extensions belong to the keyboard player if you have one, the guitarist if you don't.

    Bass: If you're playing the root from the 4th string, the 5th is always on the 3rd string, two frets up. If your root is on the 3rd string, the 5th is on the second string two frets up and on the 4th string same fret right above it.

    A considerate guitarist generally won't duplicate the bass notes by playing six note chords. It muddies the sound. A root 6 barre chord on the guitar has three root notes and two 5th's! The bass player is already playing one of each! 4 simultaneous root notes, three 5th's. Yuk.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2020
    bcorig, fakeocaster, Bassman8 and 5 others like this.
  6. drmordo

    drmordo Tele-Holic

    Age:
    46
    Posts:
    645
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2019
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    Blues scale without any major 3rd, and I flirt with the 9th a bit.
     
  7. Tele-beeb

    Tele-beeb Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,680
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2012
    Location:
    The Bluegrass
    Good idea... :)
     
  8. Chiogtr4x

    Chiogtr4x Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,903
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2007
    Location:
    Manassas Park, VA
    Well if you are playing bass, at least to start, you can't go wrong just playing the root note of the chord changes, be they major or minor right?

    Iin the same way we guitar players have learned how to form barre chords ( basic major and minor) shapes - which enables you to keep same shapes the entire length of the neck- AND play the notes of these chords individually, which helps us create melody lines, you can do similar with partial chords on the bass

    You learn the notes along the fingerboard in particular of the E and A strings which serve as the anchors for your major/minor root chords

    * I'm self taught (good ear+learned chord charts reading simple pop music sheets- don't really read music),
    So I'm just spitballing ideas
     
    Tele-beeb likes this.
  9. Nahtabot

    Nahtabot Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    278
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2020
    Location:
    USA
    If you hit bad note, the good ones will only be a half step away. :)
     
    Jim622, stinkey, Manual Slim and 5 others like this.
  10. wabashslim

    wabashslim Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    1,953
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2005
    Location:
    Sonorous Desert
    Well, the main thing to remember is to drop the third a semitone. Or better yet just stay away from thirds altogether. For an explanation of what thirds, roots & fifths are, you're going to need a smidgen of theory and I'm not paid enough here to tutor a student who expresses his unwillingness to learn at the outset.

    I think that's an answer to an ambiguous question.
     
    daddyplaysbass and Manual Slim like this.
  11. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,463
    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2011
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    Are you playing chords on your bass? Still not sure what's going on here.

    What is this "box" of which you speak? A more specific description of the shapes you're talking about would help. "Box" can mean many things.
     
    Tele-beeb likes this.
  12. DougM

    DougM Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,176
    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2017
    Location:
    Honolulu, HI
    If you're unwilling to learn any theory, then you're always going to play some bad notes.
     
  13. Tele-beeb

    Tele-beeb Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,680
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2012
    Location:
    The Bluegrass
    Not playing chords... box I’m referring to is like a square shape skipping one fret.
     
  14. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,463
    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2011
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    You mean a step. That's like a line – one side of a box. Where are the other sides of the box?

    Are you talking about traditional walking blues/jazz/country/etc. bass lines?
     
    Tele-beeb likes this.
  15. Mr. Lumbergh

    Mr. Lumbergh Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,963
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2013
    Location:
    Initech, Inc.
    [​IMG]
     
  16. Ed Driscoll

    Ed Driscoll Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    714
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2003
    Location:
    South of Dallas
    A little theory of the notes in major and minor chords goes a long way. Playing a minor (flattened) third when you're under a minor chord is a good rule of thumb.

    Or do what Ian Stewart, a founding member of the Rolling Stones, and a brilliant boogie-woogie piano player did whenever he came across minor chords -- raise your hands off the instrument: "I don’t like slow songs. They’re boring. And I don’t like minor chords. They sound Chinese.” :lol:
     
    aging_rocker and Tele-beeb like this.
  17. mfguitar

    mfguitar Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    1,509
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2008
    Location:
    Buffalo
    Lets say the song is in the key of A and you are playing a simple pattern that starts at the fifth fret of the E string (lowest string), then goes to the 4th fret of the A string then the 7th fret of the A. If the chord was a minor then the note you would need to stay away from would be the 4th fret of the 5th string, you need to move that note to the 3rd fret (C from C#). That is the flattened 3rd that makes the chord minor. Once you get used to hearing that sound you will be able to move it as needed. You are never too old to learn! Good luck!
     
    daddyplaysbass and 68Telebass like this.
  18. DougM

    DougM Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,176
    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2017
    Location:
    Honolulu, HI
    Which is why he didn't last in the Stones for long!
     
  19. Ed Driscoll

    Ed Driscoll Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    714
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2003
    Location:
    South of Dallas
    He served as road manager, was (according to at least one Stones biographer) a full partner in the group, and played piano with them, on the songs he wanted to play on, until he dropped in 1985. In his 2010 autobiography, Keith Richards wrote, "Ian Stewart. I'm still working for him. To me The Rolling Stones is his band. Without his knowledge and organization, without the leap he made from where he was coming from, to take a chance on playing with this bunch of kids, we’d be nowhere."

    (Which isn't to say that not playing minor chords is often a viable form of musical career advancement. ;) )
     
    ravindave_3600, cbnutt and AAT65 like this.
  20. JL_LI

    JL_LI Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    70
    Posts:
    3,889
    Joined:
    May 20, 2017
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    The first thing you need to learn is the notes in the scale of the key in which you are playing. In C, if your next chord is Am, the minor third of that chord is C, the first note in the scale. If your next chord is Dm, the minor third of that chord is F, the fourth note in the scale. Once you've learned your major scales, learn your minor scales. If you won't learn scales you'll be lost for what to play and you'll be playing as many bad notes as good ones. Once you know your scales, learn which notes are in the chords. Playing bass, you'll use the root and fifth to anchor the chord, using other notes in the scale as passing notes. Runs and flourishes come later after you know the basics. When I was in high school in a garage band, the bass player only knew the root and fifth of each chord. He may have been boring but he was a good anchor and no one at the dance knew the difference.
     
    SRHmusic and Ed Driscoll like this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.