What DAW do you use?

dlew919

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Steinberger. Straight into Garage band, or audacity. If I sell the product, I get it professionally mastered. Otherwise it's great and simple.
 

ahiddentableau

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The process of choosing a DAW, especially when starting from scratch, is overwhelming. What DAW do you use and why? Is one of them a little more friendly for beginners or is it just a matter of making a choice and going with it?

I think this is right: you make a choice and dive in. You mostly have to pick one and commit to learning it. Most DAWs are pretty well thought out these days. The real question is how much do you need to learn to be able to get around well enough to satisfy your creative needs but without driving yourself crazy because you're getting lost in the complexity.

I use Logic, but I don't think it matters that much for most of us guitar players. If what you're mostly after is recording layers of audio tracks and using plugins they're all going to be fine because those are simple tasks. IMO, it's the deeper level of functionality where the choice matters more. Like if you wanna use more of a loop workflow maybe Ableton is better. If you're really into MIDI editing, then the subtle differences in editors between DAWs could matter to you.
 

Linderflomann

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I really like Reaper. It's light on the CPU, gets updates constantly, with new features being regularly added. The licensing is cheap plus they don't do some big marketing shenanigans where there's a big new version with bells and whistles that they want you to pay for.

It gets really interesting when you begin to customize it for your particular workflow, with actions and such.

That said, you can make great music with any of them, so don't stress things too much. I guess I'd stay away from Pro Tools, because they seem to be running some kind of racket where they get studios locked into their business and charge elaborate prices for upgrades and support.
 

VintageSG

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I have a learning block. I have no problems with mixers/mixing desks, but translate that to a screen?, I may as well try to eat fog with a spoon.
Audacity I can cope with. Audacity I like. Is it a DAW?, a semantic, ecumenical matter discussion of which seems to polarise opinions. For a crayon-chewing klutz like myself, who struggles to work out which shoe goes on which foot; it's all I need.
I tried Ardour. I watched tutorials. I tried again. I went fog-hunting, armed with a spoon. I left my SpoonGuard (tm) behind.
Ardour and Audacity are available for free. Free is a good price. The Linux distribution I use includes them. Other O/S variants are available for both.
Try as many out as you can. If your O/S can, take a snapshot before installing so you can roll back.
 

woodman

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Started out with Pro Tools Lite and am glad to have that background, but soon switched to Logic Pro, largely influenced by our pal Getbent. Never looked back. In my view, PT is a great producer's app, but Logic offers more to creative types. YMMV.
 

FortyEight

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started with audacity. suuuuper easy to use. but lacks a LOT. but it got me started.

i eventually got reaper and love it. its just easy to use as audacity, ONCE, u set up the folder paths. and its waaaaaaaaaaay better. my recommendation would to be go with reaper before audacity.

those are the only two ive dealt with. there may be others that are just as good as reaper. im totally biased by my experience. had i tried another i might be singing its praises.
 

suthol

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Started mixing in Cubase but I couldn't get it to recognise my USB interface so couldn't record with it and then tried Reaper which I got working with no drama.

Since then I've tried Cakewalk and purchased Mixbus.

Stayed with Reaper, it does more than I need and I can do the stuff that I do need in my sleep.

All on PC, I have never been a fan of proprietary hardware and locked systems.

We are all different so try a few and find what you are comfortable with and stick to it
 

SRHmusic

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Reaper, on a workstation laptop with an IK Multimedia interface (Axe I/O). I had used Steinberg Cubase about 15 years ago for a while, but I always found it just confusing enough to make it difficult to get new project ideas going quickly.
Reaper does everything, is pretty straightforward, and it's nicely customizable, too. Very quick to get things started and expand from there.

Here are the tutorial videos. Each section with an arrow expands when you click on it. There is a pdf user guide, as well.

 

fendrguitplayr

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I have an older iMac with Logic and GarageBand. It's the older
versions and as some prefer, like me, it has the older (and better)
versions with very decent amp/cab/fx sims. I'm mainly running a guitar
into an Apogee Jam and a Akai MPK-261 synth into iMac.
 

Recalcitrant

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Ableton Live. Known as the standard for electronic musicians and DJs, it also works for pseudo-musicians like me to build tunes from clips. It's expensive, but free and low-price versions are worth trying if linear DAWs don't appeal to you. I think Live's FX, routing and track handling are superb.
 

Nogoodnamesleft

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I record on an iPad using Auria Pro. It's the closest thing to Pro Tools on an iOS device. Its strength lies in audio but has midi as well.

With Apple's camera connection kit adapter (not required with newer iPads and their usb c connectors) you can use many different audio interfaces. I have an Audient iD4 that works flawlessly.

Some might scoff at the idea of an iPad as a serious music device, but there are a number of advantages. Not the least of which are the iOS versions of plugins from the likes of FabFilter, PSPaudioware, and Audio Damage that are phenomenal and priced at a fraction of their Mac/PC versions.

As a side note, there's an iOS sampler program (that can be used within a DAW) called AudioLayer from Virsyn. I have yet to find a hardware device that could replace AudioLayer. Combine that with a host like AUM (an iOS digital mixer for AudioUnit apps) and the flexibility you have is unparalleled.
 
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Ben Harmless

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Count me as another Reaper fan. My reason is that it's objectively as powerful as anything out there, and I find all that power to be the right kind of accessible to me without undue complexity - beyond the initial learning curve, at least. If you try to learn each and every function, you will become overwhelmed, but if you have a general use in mind, you can start using it pretty quickly and add to your knowledge as you go, and as-needed. That's another strong suit - it's got a massive user community and fantastic YouTube tutorials. Kenny Gioia is indeed a guru there, even though I couldn't stand his weird vocal cadence - until he started showing his face, at which point I didn't mind so much for some reason.

It's worth saying that my use is typically in demo-ing ideas and pointing actual microphones at actual musicians more than composing or the like. Reaper can do that, but other DAWs have full built-in instruments (Logic, Garage Band) and advanced looping functions as primary tools (Ableton).

I will say that as someone coming from the audio world, I don't find Audacity to be at all intuitive. It was designed as a basic audio file editor rather than a DAW. That said, those who started with it can use it just fine, and they did just release a major update that brought it closer to a modern DAW. Oh, and it's free.
 

klasaine

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Prior to the Pandemic I was a Cubase user (both PC and Mac) and I just recorded quick demo ideas and my own guitar parts for other people's projects. When the lock down hit I switched to Universal Audio's DAW 'Luna' (Mac only currently). I initially tried it just because it came free when I bought a new UAd interface. I stick with it because it has a traditional analog style work flow graphic and integrates really well with the Apollo. The GUI (graphic user interface) looks like a channel strip and a desk. Like Ben Harmless, I primarily mic or DI instruments. I don't 'compose' in my daw. I don't use loops and I rarely use a VI.

To echo everyone else here ...
If all you want to do is record yourself or maybe play with tracks, possibly learn how to move notes around and cut a section out and back in somewhere else - ANY daw will do that and it's not complicated to learn those basic functions.
 

netgear69

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england
I have a Komplete Audion6 I do belive it is the 1st one which i use with Cubase5 I also have cubase10 which i never use too complicated and overkill I am about to upgrade the daw this one has seen better days been looking at maybe a focusrite scarlett 2i2 or another native instruments daw maybe the mk2 not that i do much but good to have
 




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