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What chord is this?

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by telestratosonic, Nov 21, 2020.

  1. Spooky88

    Spooky88 TDPRI Member

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    Whatever you wish to call that chord it would be ??/A meaning there is an A in the bass. That would make it easier on the rhythm section.
     
  2. wray

    wray NEW MEMBER!

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    A7sus2
     
  3. GearGeek01

    GearGeek01 Tele-Meister

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    E A D G B E

    X 0 2 0 0 2

    Single note names are:

    A - E - G - B - F#/Gb

    Every note in a chord can be "the root" so this combination of notes can have 5 different chord names. Chords are constructed off of the major scale.

    There are only 3 chord categories:
    - Major
    - Minor (have a flat third)
    - Dominant Seventh (have a flat seventh)

    Its fairly easy to construct all major scales by intervals using...

    W - W - H - W - W - W - H
    ("W" meaning a whole step interval - 2 frets away on the guitar)
    ("H" meaning a half step interval - 1 fret away on the guitar)

    The easiest scale to figure is the key of "C Major" which has no sharps or flats...

    C D E F G A B C
    W W H W W W H

    The root scale of the chord will be the first letter, such as "C". If there are additional tones the composer wants you to play along with the normal 1-3-5 triad, they will notate it such as "Cmaj7" meaning the 7th tone of the C major scale is added to the 1-3-5 triad. If it is a C Minor chord, it is notated "Cm" and sometimes "Cmin". With all minor chords, unless otherwise noted, the seventh is always a flat seven. So, "Cm7". Minor chords all have a flatted third, so a Cm7 would be 1-b3-5-b7. Dominant seventh chords have a major triad and a flatted seventh tone. 1-3-5-b7.

    The classical composers who invented the base for the music we play and for music theory, extend the scale beyond one octave up to the 13th consecutive note of the scale. In the key of C that would create a scale such as:

    C D E F G A B C D E F G A

    Then each scale note is given a number when combined into a chord. The root, 3rd, and 5th do not change names over the octave. However over the octave, the 2 becomes a 9, the 4 becomes an 11, and the 6 becomes a 13... like this ("R" stand for "root" and could be called the "one (1)" but more commonly the "root").

    C D E F G A B C D E F G A
    R 2 3 4 5 6 7 R 9 3 11 5 13

    Sticking to the intervals for a major scale as:
    W-W-H-W-W-W-H

    You can construct 5 major scales from the 5 notes in your chord, thus the same arrangement of notes can have 5 different names (or more).

    Single note names are:

    A - E - G - B - F#/Gb

    A major:
    A B C# D E F# G# A B C# D E F#
    R 2 3 4 5 6 7 R 9 3 11 5 13

    E major:
    E F# G# A B C# D# E F# G# A B C#
    R 2 3 4 5 6 7 R 9 3 11 5 13

    G major:
    G A B C D E F# G A B C D E
    R 2 3 4 5 6 7 R 9 3 11 5 13

    B major:
    B C# D# E F# G# A# B C# D# E F# G#
    R 2 3 4 5 6 7 R 9 3 11 5 13

    F# major (has to contain all sharps)
    F# G# A# B C# D# E# F# G# A# B C# D#
    R 2 3 4 5 6 7 R 9 3 11 5 13

    Gb major (has to contain all flats)
    Gb Ab Bb Cb Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb Cb Db Eb
    R 2 3 4 5 6 7 R 9 3 11 5 13

    ----------------------------------------------------

    With the known scale notes and the known intervals in the chords, we can find 5 (6 actually) chord names for this same collection of notes.

    Key of A:
    A - E - G - B - F#/Gb
    R 5 b7 9 13
    A13 (numbers should be in exponents)(has no 3rd)
    PRONOUNCED: "A dominant seventh thirteenth" (or just "A dominant thirteenth")(or just "A thirteenth")


    Key of E:
    A - E - G - B - F#/Gb
    11 R b3 5 9
    Em11
    PRONOUNCED: "E minor eleventh" (most likely actual name for your chord progression)


    Key of G:
    A - E - G - B - F#/Gb
    9 13 R 3 maj7
    Amaj13
    PRONOUNCED: "A major thirteenth"


    Key of B:
    A - E - G - B - F#/Gb
    b7 5 b13 R 5
    PRONOUNCED: "B dominant seventh flat thirteenth"


    Key of F#:
    A - E - G - B - F#/Gb
    b3 b7 b9 11 R
    F#mb911 (everything after "m" would be in exponents)
    PRONOUNCED: "F sharp minor flat nine eleventh"


    Key of Gb:
    A - E - G - B - F#/Gb
    b11 b13 b9 b3 R
    Gbmb9b11b13
    PRONOUNCED: "G flat flat nine flat eleventh flat thirteenth"
    (very uncommon, most composers will steer clear of the key of G flat...)

    ------------------------------

    The basic chord progression for the key of D would be:

    I ii iii IV V vi vii
    Dmaj Em Fm Gmaj Amaj Bm Cdim

    So, in this instance this chord in the key of D would most likely be:
    Em11 ("E minor eleventh")


    Key of E:
    A - E - G - B - F#/Gb
    11 R b3 5 9
    Em11
    PRONOUNCED: "E minor eleventh" (most likely actual name for your chord progression)
    - the flatted third in the chord steers it to E minor land...
    - with no 3rd in the "A" named chord is more elusive, and since Em is the ii (2) chord of the key of D I would name and notate this chord as an "Em11"

    This chord is "Em11" ("E minor eleventh")
     
  4. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    [​IMG]

    I think we can all agree the progression is in D major and this is functioning as the V chord, so A13(sus2).
     
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  5. Jack S

    Jack S Friend of Leo's

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    I may be a little late in the mix, but here is the original version of Four Strong Winds I heard in my youth:
     
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  6. GearGeek01

    GearGeek01 Tele-Meister

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    Edit
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2020
  7. ASATKat

    ASATKat Friend of Leo's

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    No such thing as a #3rd
     
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  8. Mexitele Blues

    Mexitele Blues Tele-Afflicted

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    But there is a flat 4.

    [​IMG]
     
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  9. telestratosonic

    telestratosonic Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    That was early in. The consensus is a A13(sus2) and I'm content with it.
     
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