What board for my final build? (PR)

Discussion in 'Shock Brother's DIY Amps' started by Paul-T, May 22, 2021.

What's best for a vintage style Princeton Reverb board?

  1. Eyelet FIbre board plus insulation from mojotone or eBay

    1 vote(s)
    12.5%
  2. Eyelet board on standoffs from Hoffman

    2 vote(s)
    25.0%
  3. Just get a turret board!

    3 vote(s)
    37.5%
  4. Another choice (please explain)

    2 vote(s)
    25.0%
  1. Paul-T

    Paul-T Tele-Holic

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    Honestly, this will be my final build. Probably.

    My next project, after 5f2a, 5E3 and deluxe micro, is a Princeton Reverb. I'm not in a hurry for this but I want to get the board now, source the other bits gradually with a chassis from Modulus (cheap), build the cabinet over the summer and take a few months over the rest.

    So here's the deal. I've only ever used turret boards, and enjoyed it, but fancied a change. I thought an old school eyelet build would be different - and would look cool. I'm sourcing the board from the US as a board member has really kindly offered to package a couple of small items together and send on to me.

    Are there any pitfalls? Is it that much harder with an eyelet board?

    I looked at Doug Hoffman's site, as I'd like to give him some $$$ but his eyelet board only seem to mount on standoffs. Is that an issue? I guess they're the FR4 or similar and won't look as vintage. But maybe they're more ergonomic?

    MOjotone do fibre boards, there are some promising ones on eBay too, perhaps I'd buy one extra item (pilot light) from mojotone while I'm at it. Are there any differences between fibre boards?

    Of course, you might think a turret board is better ergonomically, too.

    Please tell us what board you liked best, and why - and if there are any tips for working with eyelets, please share!
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2021
  2. jimgchord

    jimgchord Tele-Afflicted

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    Build a turret board
     
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  3. James Knox

    James Knox Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    I figured out early that I prefer eyelets over turrets. I have been using Hoffman Boards with Eyelets exclusively for the past year. I like them. A lot!
     
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  4. sds1

    sds1 Tele-Afflicted

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    Turret boards are cool, they just can get annoying when you're at a circuit node requiring 3+ connections. I think eyelets handle the 3+ use case better, at least the big kind you find on old Fender boards.
     
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  5. 72_Custom

    72_Custom Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    I can’t speak to Hoffman, but I’ve bought eyelet boards from Mojotone, Weber, and Moddjobs. I’ve found them all to be about equal. One can easily add stand-off capability by drilling four more holes in the corners.
     
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  6. NSB_Chris

    NSB_Chris Tele-Holic

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    I have done both eyelets with a fiber board and turret boards. For vintage circuits that are not overly crowded with components and not shoehorned into a super tight chassis, I would say both work just fine. Eyelets can be more convenient to terminate 3 or 4 components at one point, but turrets make it much easier to create ground bus lines or connect several points quickly with just bus wire. If you find it beneficial to route wires under the board or mount the board over other components, then a firm board is a must. One thing that is easier with a big fiber board is you don’t have to line up a bunch of standoffs accurately to support the board. Since the fiber board sandwich mounts directly to the chassis with one or two anchors, you can just plunge one or two anchor holes and you are done.

    I have not done a Princeton Reverb, but my guess is you will not be disappointed no matter which way you go.
     
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  7. King Fan

    King Fan Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Paul, you *know* I vote eyelets ever since I did my PR that way. What has you worried about standoffs? FWIW I find them easier than a backing board.

    Also, I hear about tweed disease and conductive fiberboard, but I live in Utah, so have no experience. Someone outside this Class 5 drought zone will have to comment on epoxy v. fiber.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2021
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  8. Paul-T

    Paul-T Tele-Holic

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    Actually King Fan, standoffs might be easier and even within the tight tolerances of my Deluxe micro build i did manage to drill them all in the right location.

    I suppose I was thinking of the backing board in case solder drips down from an eyelet onto the chassis, but I guess the correct technique might be to solder in all cables before I put the board in the chassis, right?

    Annoyingly, mojotone seem to have sold out of sozo blue, which I was thinking of indulging myself with but can't justify with European prices of £10 each. I'll have a quick look around to see if anyone reputable stocks both fibre board and sozo in the US, but if not I'll simply press the button on mojotone and stick with the Mallory 150.

    Belatedly, I saw there's a good comparison of mojotone vs hoffman here.
     
  9. King Fan

    King Fan Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Good one. I'd totally forgotten that thread. Yeh, the one downside I know to Hoffman epoxy is the 3.125 width. But as mentioned there, it's easy to cut down the long edges. Folks talk about bandsaws, table saws, etc, but as @Les Gear mentions there, epoxy cuts easily with a standard hacksaw. I just use a couple clamps and a saw guide made out of any straight board.
     
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  10. Uncle Daddy

    Uncle Daddy Tele-Afflicted

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    Modulus amps in the UK supplies a PR turret board, including the bias board.
    Tube Amp Doctor does an eyelet board set.
     
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  11. JohnnyCrash

    JohnnyCrash Doctor of Teleocity

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    I like them both.

    I’d add a third thing: Aesthetics.

    There were a few amps where I specifically chose a custom board color for in case I wanted to start using a clear back panel, which I never did.

    Ironically, the only amp I’m finally doing this to is built into a hand-drilled crappy Hammond cake tin, using a universal eyelet board (unevenly hand-hacked), into a $20 warped pine beekeeper’s bee box I glued into misshapen shape, and stained (unevenly) in budget spraycan wood oil.
     
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