1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

What are three of your favorite band/making music moments?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by naveed211, Apr 11, 2021.

  1. naveed211

    naveed211 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,308
    Joined:
    May 16, 2009
    Location:
    Iowa
    Looking forward to reading your experiences. Making music can be thankless at times, but these moments stood out as particularly memorable.

    1. Playing with my touring band years ago, at one point at a show in Milwaukee (more or less our home base), the singer knocked over his mic stand. The entire first row responded by singing the vocals to our song as loud as they could until the singer got going again. It was such an amazing feeling just to have anyone like our song enough to know the lyrics.

    2. Getting a song on the radio. It was just a local station’s local music hour, but submitting a song, getting it selected with some nice feedback from the DJs, and having my wife and kid hear it along with some excited responses from friends and family was something really special.

    3. Playing a packed house in an earlier band. It just encapsulated everything great about making music. Everyone in the band stepped up and invited a lot of people, everybody showed up. And yeah, it was a smaller venue, but having a big crowd of friends dancing and rocking out to us was such a good time. No drama, just good vibes.
     
  2. Killing Floor

    Killing Floor Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,009
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2021
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    You nailed it. Sitting at a red light and hearing someone in the next car singing along to a song you wrote on their radio! Nothing compares.

    First time you show up to sound check and your gear is set up, that was when I thought I made it.

    First time some rando teen recognized me out of my hometown and away from a gig setting. Felt famous even though I was absolutely not.
     
    richiek65, naveed211 and Terero like this.
  3. Terero

    Terero TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    26
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2021
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    1- My first proper show with a space rock band, complete with dancers, laser show and other performance artists. Even had controversy because some of the band's wives felt that the dancers were too over the top and complained. Just tons of fun.

    2- The first packed show in a big club I ever played that was sold out. Having young dudes headbanging with hair and beer flying and also making the "we're not worthy" bowing motion during my solos made me actually think I could keep doing this, and I have.

    3- When my current (and fave) band played our entire debut album from start to finish at a sold out show and a local celebrity rocker came up to me and said we were the best band in the event. I said his band was (and it was) but it felt encouraging as he was serious.
     
    richiek65 and naveed211 like this.
  4. Dan German

    Dan German Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    11,436
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Location:
    Left of the Left Coast
    Hmmm... the bar is already set pretty high here. I’m going to bring the tone down to mortal (amateur hack) levels:

    1) My first open mic, when I was 36, I played a song I wrote in front of other people for the first time ever. My heart sank when a young woman (like late teens young) went up before me and absolutely killed it. She is now one of my fave recording artists. Anyway, I wasn’t feeling the love, having to follow someone like that. Still, I struggled through, and after my tune, a local hippie/folkie music scene dude, who was a bit of an idol of mine as a teen, came up to me, patted me on the back, and told me how much he loved my tune, and how “well-written” it was. Even if he was just being nice, that was special.

    2) Being asked to play at BearFest in Churchill MB. I’m not that good, so I was a bit surprised. It’s a Big Day in a Small Town, so I was flattered. I had a blast.

    3) Having someone request a tune they’d heard me play before. A huge confidence-builder to find out someone not only remembers you playing something, but actually wants to hear it again.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2021
  5. 985plowboy

    985plowboy Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,174
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2012
    Location:
    South Louisiana
    Seeing kids wearing our band T-shirts.
    People singing along to original tunes.
    Seeing happiness on people’s faces and knowing you had a part in that.
     
    Dan German and naveed211 like this.
  6. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    14,913
    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2003
    Location:
    northwest
    -We opened for Lee Michaels at the Paramount in Seattle in the early 70's . That was a thrill although I was so nervous I hardly remember much.

    -On the funny side: When I got back into music 25 years ago, a friend I played with in the 60's let me join his trio while I got my chops back. His wife played bass (poorly but not too bad). Our first gig was a Halloween Gig. After the first set we got back on stage and were playing a song... but something just didn't sound right!
    I looked at the bass player, she was loudly yapping at someone next to the stage while playing. Trouble is... she didn't turn her amp back on after break! She didn't even realize it!
    I yelled at her: "Your amp's not on!" She looked me with a scowl. Again I yelled "Your amp's not on!" and she yelled back : "I'm AM NOT rambling on!" :lol:
     
  7. ravindave_3600

    ravindave_3600 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,232
    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Location:
    Newly Indiana
    1. The first time I met someone who knew the words to my songs. In fact he knew most of the album.

    2. When someone in another country emailed me to say he'd been given a copy of said album and asked if we had any others.

    3. When I mentioned to a bandmate I had some new songs to try and he replied, "You've been writing again?!?" in a way I knew he was excited and happy to hear it.
     
    naveed211 likes this.
  8. StrangerNY

    StrangerNY Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    4,818
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2010
    Location:
    Somewhere out on that horizon
    Coming home from a gig one night and finding about 20 videos of the gig on Youtube.

    Signing a record deal. Felt like validation.

    Playing an open jam night and seeing Ritchie Blackmore walk in - and then having him come up to me afterwards and compliment my playing.

    - D
     
  9. O- Fender

    O- Fender Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,893
    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2003
    Location:
    Canada
    I was in a theater/comedy group writing and performing our own material.
    1) Through that, my better half and I were asked to write some radio commercials (actually more like a 20 second joke followed by the restaurant name) The first time we heard our commercial in the car radio was amazing.
    2) Walking downtown, some kid, maybe 12 points to me and quoted a punchline from a comedy bit we wrote and performed. I first bumped him and said "thanks, my man " to which he responded with another punchline. He knew our stuff. Wow.

    edit: come to think of it, the kid was about 12... we only performed in bars. How did he know?

    3) my parents came to town and met a friend they hadn't seen in 40 years or so (long story) They were catching up and when my mom mentioned they were in town to visit me, they said my name, the guy said "oh, the actor. Funny guy". The fact that I heard this second hand still blows my mind.
    4) I submitted writing samples hoping to get a freelance writing gig. Not sure how but a guy who's writing I admire (who doesn't work for that company) called me and said he liked my stuff. He's worked on some big name TV shows. I didn't get the job but he said he would keep me in mind if anything else comes up. 4 years ago, so probably not but the fact he took the time to give me the feedback... wow.
     
  10. Chiogtr4x

    Chiogtr4x Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    10,411
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2007
    Location:
    Manassas Park, VA
    These are three that come to mind:

    From 2000-2004 my band ( under my own name)
    had a fantastic lineup of musicians ( including a wonderful, beautiful lead singer, Kim) that just kicked butt playing ( older) Classic Rock and some originals and we just jammed and rocked the same 3-4 places in Alexandria, for years. The energy from the band and crowd ( lots of partying!) - just fun gigs and everyone loved Kim ( sadly passed on).
    " Whipping Post" ( insane and noisy) was often the closer tune.
    IMG_3897.jpg

    Another moment would have to be a few years ago our band playing a Wedding gig and " Tupelo Honey" was requested by the bride and groom ( I had never played it or sung it) for a First Dance- and we nailed it! Folks loved it ( now we do it most gigs)

    A third, is my Grateful Dead/ Blues/ surf trio getting a regular Sunday AM gig last year, outside a Marina cafe in Annapolis, MD. ( and it is coming back in a few weeks!)

    We just play in the street to the Neighborhood- dogs, kids, sailors, diners, Navy Midshipmen, Get good $$, free breakfast- play Dead tunes, a perfect regular gig!
    IMG_9792.jpg
     
    Cali Dude likes this.
  11. drmordo

    drmordo Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    46
    Posts:
    1,046
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2019
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    My dad was a jazz pianist and singer, though he always described himself as an entertainer. I'm about equally skilled on guitar and drums, but I played drums with him on and off for several years in the late 90s and 00s, and most of my greatest musical moments came from that gig. He died about four months back from COVID.

    1. Honestly, one of my most fond memories is filling up a dance floor with old people dancing to jazz standards. Often we'd start the set with an empty dance floor, but by the end we'd have it packed full of sweaty retirees who would then head to the bar for a fresh drink. Dad would pace the set very carefully to build intensity but also give people a breather from time to time, and it never failed to suck them in.

    2. My dad and I played with the same bass player most of the time, and we eventually got pretty telepathic. I remember one night we played some delicate ballad like Misty or Stardust, and right at the end the bass player played some line that was kind of bluesy. For some reason, we looked at each other, then kicked into the the standard walking bomp-bo-bomp-bo-bomp-bo-bomp-ba-baaaaa blues ending. My dad followed us as we put this dramatic blues ending on the end of his gentle jazz ballad. Then after the applause, he just looked at us and said, "You guys are weird."

    3. 25 years back I was playing guitar with a college show choir. It was a horrible gig but the rhythm section were all top notch, which made it tolerable. At one point at a rehearsal we played this country ballad, and after I played the guitar solo half the singers forgot to come in. The director stopped the group, then said, "I know it was a great guitar solo, but you can't get so distracted you forget to sing."

    4. This one is something I witnessed. Back in the 90s the Pensacola Jazz Fest was pretty good, and the USAF Airmen of Note came several years in a row. After the first year, my dad talked them into coming to a close by bar after their set, and they proceeded to have a jam session like nothing I have ever seen. It is easily to closest thing I have seen to a 1940s bebop jam session in my life. Those guys were all just killer, and they were all trying to outdo each other. It was crazy.

    Finally, not directly music related, but when I was gigging with my dad, he landed a snowbird gig where they wanted comedy, so in-between jazz sets, my dad got up and did an hour of standup comedy. He was not a comedian by trade, but he had them laughing in the aisles. As far as I know, he had never done it before, and he never did it again.
     
  12. Norris Vulcan

    Norris Vulcan Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,348
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2015
    Location:
    Somerset, UK
    The gig where our sax player fell through the wooden stage, broke the boards. :lol:
    (It was only 2 feet high, so no serious damage.)

    And there was a gig where we supported a proper, well-known band and the guitarist asked if he could use my amp - a Hiwatt Custom 100.
    After our set he came on and just ran his hand across the knobs turning them all up full...sounded great. (He obviously knew how to use the guitar controls).
     
    StrangerNY likes this.
  13. TeleJ717

    TeleJ717 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    46
    Posts:
    84
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2021
    Location:
    United States
    1. Having a band I was in compared to Black Flag in a zine from half away across the country.

    2. People paying for cassette demos we made.

    3. Girls.
     
    StrangerNY likes this.
  14. sax4blues

    sax4blues Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,846
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2006
    Location:
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Only one. A friends back yard party and everything just clicked, highlighted by out of body solo on Break Up Song, and capped by the cops coming.
     
  15. LGOberean

    LGOberean Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    67
    Posts:
    12,630
    Joined:
    May 31, 2008
    Location:
    Corpus Christi, Texas
    You're right about that. More than once I've experienced being treated like a flesh-covered radio. :(
     
    StrangerNY likes this.
  16. marshman

    marshman Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    5,474
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2007
    Location:
    SE PA
    1. First post-military gig, we'd worked on that stuff for about 6 months and lined up our first paying bar gig, and we killed it. Very satisfying.

    2. A few years later, same band pared down to a power trio, we were playing a crappy hole-in-the-wall and giving the best Classic/Southern Rock show we could manage, when a guy comes in that sings JUST like Ronnie Van Zandt...we played every Skynyrd song we knew (which was a lot in those days) and he sang every one--from 11:30 til 2, non-stop, and the place packed up and went nuts.

    3. 4-5 years ago was tapped to play bass for a friends tribute orchestra show and we were doing an Eagles show. An hour of hits, Hotel California straight through, then an encore. We managed to play that show on 3 stages over a month or so and it was really a blast. World Café Live was a great venue and it was too much fun.
     
    StrangerNY likes this.
  17. loopfinding

    loopfinding Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,201
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2011
    Location:
    europe endless
    1. playing noise music in an osaka ramen shop the size of my apartment for 30 people while they were eating dinner. either that or playing free jazz at some book fair in a shopping mall in nagoya where the act before us was childrens songs with people in animal suits. both some real "where the hell am i right now?" moments.

    2. the time i played noise at some city arts fair downtown and it was so obscenely loud people were horrified on the street. the PA was outside on the street and we were inside the record shop so we couldn't even hear what we were doing at all, just saw people reacting outside and took the piss. some panhandler who was dancing the whole set came up to us after and was like "i don't know what the hell on god's earth i just saw but it was POWERFUL."

    3. the time my high school thrash band played a vfw hall and it was kind of empty for the hall. we didn't want to play the stage so we set up on the floor facing a corner and corralled everyone in. the set ended like 5 minutes in when someone got knocked into the bass player's 6x12 and it fell on the drums.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2021
    StrangerNY likes this.
  18. Old Deaf Roadie

    Old Deaf Roadie Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    2,857
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2017
    Location:
    Oregon Coast
    Playing the Buddy Holly Tribute at the Surf Ballroom in Clear Lake, IA in the early 90's when Joe B. Mauldin of The Crickets asked if he could use my bass amp for their set (the supplied backline bass amp was a joke), then imbibing with them for the rest of the night backstage. That was a master class in learning about rock & roll directly from some of the guys who invented it, and it was best for our band's reputation that we opened the show, because I personally was in no condition to close it...

    At that point, I had worked as crew for a few years at a soundco, and meeting stars was a pretty normal affair for us. But I was pretty starstruck being on that particular bill with real-deal legends, in fact, that I would have paid Joe B. to use my amp if he had held out his hand for for some scratch!
     
    ravindave_3600 and StrangerNY like this.
  19. naveed211

    naveed211 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,308
    Joined:
    May 16, 2009
    Location:
    Iowa
    Quite the horrifying mental image!
     
    LGOberean likes this.
  20. gridlock

    gridlock Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,379
    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2011
    Location:
    Tampa, Fl
    No.1, My kids home from college all coming to watch my band play for a Toy’s for Tots Christmas benefit.
     
    StrangerNY likes this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.