What are the most miles you've ever put on a vehicle?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by RogerC, Nov 16, 2016.

  1. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Some kinds of cars/SUVs (the Korean brand ones are legion) are mind numbingly un-fun to drive. Some vehicles vibrate at various frequencies (and the baby falls asleep and that's good) but in many instances the driver and his navigator are hypnotized as well. The wagon and sedans I have are at the opposite end of the attention spectrum. Something about the care with which the seats are designed and constructed. The placement of the pedals. The location of the instruments, the vents, the mirrors, the steering wheel, the gear shift, the switches. Heated and in some cases ventilated seats. Does the car design I like tend to favor my body shape and dimensions perhaps more than it would help someone else? Sure. But I'm being genuinely honest that I don't even come close to dreading driving all over the place, and so often. I "live" in my car, and I "live" with this guitar on my knee, and I "live" with my puppy dog at the other end of a leash. Etc.
     
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  2. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire

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    :lol::lol::lol: A friend of mine that I emailed this morning said almost exactly the same thing.

    Yep, I commute 130 miles a day, 4 days/week.

    Agreed about Hondas and Toyotas. This Sienna has been so good to us that all we have is Toyotas now. Whenever the Sienna dies, it'll be replaced with a Honda or Toyota or one of their luxury badges.

    It does feel like I'm living in mine at times, but I enjoy driving. The main source of my mileage is the 130 mile daily commute. But I only work 4 days/week. I'm home by 6:40 every night, and I get 3 days off every week, so it's really not that bad.
     
  3. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire

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    Same. I just enjoy driving. Whenever my family takes a vacation, we usually drive. A few years ago we headed from Oklahoma down to La Grange, Georgia, then up the east coast to Maryland and then back again. I drove every mile of the trip and enjoyed it.
     
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  4. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I typically buy used vehicles with around 10 thousand plus miles on them and sell them at or before 150 thousand. I rarely service them, just minor oil change every few years and put fuel in them. I've never had to replace an engine or transmission. Only replaced about 6 batteries ever, some small parts.

    In the past couple weeks i've had a fuel pump crap out from sitting and my main vehicle is overheating due to a coolant leak. Both small repairs I'll fix myself.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2019
  5. verb boten

    verb boten Tele-Holic

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    The only vehicle i know that the odometer is accurate would be my 1995 Ram PU, 203,000 and still rolling. I've owned a few in the past that had to have some odometer "adjustment", the days when you put a special bit in a drill & run it backwards.
     
  6. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

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    Here's the chronology .
    At 92,000 miles , I swapped a 1968 302 into it that had the pieces I wanted .
    At about 160,000 miles , I broke the transmission on I-78 at about 75 MPH . Locked it up tighter than a bull's you know what . Fortunately , I got the clutch quickly enough to not harm the engine .
    In 2000 at roughly 270,000 miles , I broke a valve spring .
    I rebuilt the original engine to the same spec as the '68 engine and put her in .
    Upon arriving at Elkhart Lake in 1993 , I lost another transmission . I made a swap at the track . I actually managed to find a correct replacement at a salvage yard and spent every minute not on the track under the van to make the swap . The guys at the Skip Barber School gave me some fresh oil and this is how it has remained until today .
    The van is an E150 Ford with a 4-speed manual trans factory equipped . I don't care for slush boxes .
     
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  7. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I hear you.

    I've become interested lately, in the story of what happens to most vehicles that are "let go" after a couple of owners.

    We tend to assume the good parts will be re-used on other cars and the rest of the material will go back into the supply chain. I'm concerned that this model does not work, or only works were the raw material is hotly sought after and the wreck is found close to cities where space is at a premium.

    Other than Houston and Chicago, maybe a handful of other examples, a lot of tired old cars in Middle America come to rest in brownfield sites or pretend to be available by the loan company for purchase as transportation in low rent parking lots on the bypassed roads of bypassed towns and crossroads. Lots and lots and lots of "forgotten" cars that are in the hands of lazy or disabled people who can't really dismantle or make any purpose of them, or which lay up in yards in half dozens and dozens and those vehicles are NOT going anywhere. These are just a whole bunch of miniature Superfund sites, and we don't have the will to clean this stuff up and it just piling up all over the place.

    We cannot crush this vehicle - this is a pickup and surely some one will want it soon enough. And over here is a Stratus, Focus or a Cobalt and not a single bit of the sheet metal is damaged. The sun bakes down on it; the mice get into it. The fluids leak out of it. There is no easy economic means by which the Custodians of all this stuff can be motivated to get in there and do something with it.

    +

    Anyway, I consume too much gasoline. I get that. But I'm trying to offset this by making the most thorough and efficient use of the 7 cars we have as I possibly can. Once upon a time I was pleased to get 150,000 miles of use from a particular car but now I feel like I've got to do much better than that. Because I feel that, when I cut a car loose, it will just sort of hang around out there for a good long while. I feel personally responsible for these kinds of messes. They're more tangible to me than the vast amounts of carbon dioxide and monoxide gases and waste heat and other pollution I am creating driving the cars.

    In a sort of way, we have adopted 7 older dogs that perhaps nobody else will care for.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2019
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  8. Wrighty

    Wrighty Tele-Afflicted

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    Since I hit semi-retirement my car sits on tge drive and does less than 5K a year. Wasted really but It’s a keeper, I’d lose a ton of cash if I p/x’d it.
     
  9. Paul in Colorado

    Paul in Colorado Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I think I got 236,000 out of my '65 Chevy Van, but it had been an Indiana Bell phone company truck before I got it.
     
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  10. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm due for a new car soon and this time I'm shopping for a late 70's F250 in reasonable condition. I'll recondition it and just maintain that for as long as I can. I need a pickup for work and can't justify the price the newer models go for and I don't like the sensitive electronics etc they put in modern vehicles these days. Hopefully it will see me through and I won't need to replace it until i'm done with driving.
     
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  11. guitarmoron

    guitarmoron Tele-Meister

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    86 accord 344,00 only one engine/tranny
     
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  12. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Part of the reason for four Saab 9-5s and not fewer, was that very belief that some of them, or one of them at least, would get a case of the electric blues. That the car would appear whole but some e-gremlin deep inside it would stop it cold.

    I still like an F-250, but I'm not as infallible or immortal as I used to be. I want airbags; and I want something I have a better chance of maintaining control of when the weather suddenly ices over. I don't need a 100% full Nanny-mobile but I like a few of the basic safety devices.
     
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  13. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I am probably @ 1500 miles a yr myself local use. But we also use it as our road car when we shoot to Seattle, Spokane, Crater Lake etc etc. Wife still works and does a solid 1k per month commuting in a 40 MPG Honda Fit. Or would take the AWD CRV if bad winter works days surface. Although the Fit with all 4 snows does surprisingly well in the white stuff.
     
  14. daddyplaysbass

    daddyplaysbass Tele-Holic

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    2008 Prius 212,000 still running fine when I traded it off in 2017
     
  15. Wrighty

    Wrighty Tele-Afflicted

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    My wife’s car tends to get used for local running around, so that does silly low mileage as well. We couldn’t manage with one car, we both need to be in different places at different times. Should really both get something ‘sensible’ but, nah, keep what we've got and swallow the 29 mpg
     
  16. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'd gladly not have bought the CRV and kept using the older CRV until it got taken/totaled. Truth is we like the new one a lot better, and newer is always nicer usually. But also closer to the point of loosing the most possible money on it, highest cost per mile etc.

    I was driving a 94 Prelude VT, lowered and worked. Removable steering wheel no airbag etc. After seeing the old CRV get totaled and my getting to drive my wife home from the scene of the accident... I decided what the new one cost for the 5 star rating might be worth the $24k for the new one. So we have two 5 star crash rated and costs associated there-to.
     
  17. Harry Styron

    Harry Styron Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I had an 88 Bonneville. My wife totaled it in 1994. I sold it to a guy who owned a body shop. He repaired it and drove it for years. I saw it a month ago in traffic. Looked like crap.
     
  18. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Sorting out wrecks after the fact has to be a very trying experience. Problem with all of it, the driver will get the jail time and the company will pay the bill. I was glad when the electronic logging came in. They always kicked on the driver's rear for having too many hours, but who caused it? His employer that's who. Now if you're talking about owner operators that's a whole different can of worms.

    When I worked in the LPG end of trucking, if a guy said I'm out of hours when they threw him a new dispatch, they say, "old so, and so, don't wanna work, he's one of them sissy boys." Then they'd leave him sit home until he was about ready to sign up for unemployment insurance. Then they'd call him back and say are you the kind of guy who wants to work, or are you one of them sissy boys? I never got that, but I've seen it happen to guys. I just took the loads, and made it work.

    I was waiting on some money from my previous employee, and gave the company notice early on, when I got the money, I was out of there. They thought it was just truck driver talk. I also saw early on that people who work around LPG don't live very long. I won't argue about that since I've seen 'em flame out. Probably can't prove it, but when half the guys you knew at a company are dead, gotta be some reason behind it. When I got my money, I took two weeks off, paid off my house and quit!
     
  19. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    When I worked as a hydraulic supply sales rep, and consultant, I bought a new pickup, drove it five years, and would put about two hundred thousand miles on it. It was sad seeing the truck go from fresh off the lot, to it's return five years later, and a new one take its place. It's a testament to how well vehicles are built today that I had very little in the way of mechanical problems during a fifteen year run. I had the best kind of pickup truck the last five years of my working life, I had a company pickup. I can assure that is the best possible pickup truck you can have.
     
  20. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    I think there are a LOT of people out there who believe Hondas and Toyotas are more reliable than U.S. companies, but that is based on the 80s and 90s. Since then American
    manufacturing standards have gotten much, much better. And don't forget, many foreign-badged vehicles including Hondas and Toyotas are built in the USA. So there has been
    a great deal of convergence, and reliability and longevity have gone way up for all vehicles. There are some real dogs out there, but even the dogs have better reliability than cars
    built 20 years ago. Competition over the decades has resulted in dramatic increases in quality and reliability across the industry.

    I have a Chevy Volt and it has been a fantastic car with zero problems. Wonderful fit, finish, everything. I think GM quality is right up there these days. Ford isn't too bad, either.
    Fiat/Jeep/Chrysler, not so much, although a couple models do well. Rather than go with instinct, reliability and repair stats are available these days for any make and model.

    The car industry is in trouble. Too much competition. Young people are not interested in owning cars-- would rather Uber or Zip Car as needed. Cars have become so much more
    reliable that people can wait much longer to replace cars, and used cars stay on the roads much longer, changing hands more times. The industry is also afraid of the switch to electric cars
    because electric cars are even MORE reliable, with far less maintenance required. Battery packs will have to be switched out, but other than that there isn't much to repair or maintain.
    You don't even need to do brake jobs very much because regenerative braking doesn't rely on friction pads. Shocks, rack and pinion, cabin electronics, power door/window/windshield washer
    motors, heater/ A/C components, and that's about it for things that might need fixing.

    The fancy electronics are also getting simpler. A Tesla 3 is essentially run by a single computer and a bunch of sensors. Using a central processor and unified software to run all of a car's systems is much cheaper and
    more reliable than the old days. I had an old Mercedes and it had all these very expensive, custom, analog electronic boxes to manage things like ignition timing, anti lock brake systems,
    air bags, etc. And all the sensors were much more expensive, dodgy, and custom one-offs.

    On the downside, if that central processor fries for some reason then you're not going anywhere. Bricked. During the
    transition from full mechanical to partial computer a lot of cars could limp along just fine in full mechanical mode if one of the electronics modules or sensors failed, but you would get a "check engine" light.
    Once they go to 100% computer mode and a single central processor then you are either "all systems go" (minus a non-critical sensor or two, perhaps), or "dead in the water".

    One thing I don't really understand is why companies like Kia and Hyundai don't put out a medium or small pickup truck. Right now there is only Toyota Tacoma, Ford Ranger,
    and an ancient Nissan Frontier in that segment. Seems to me like Kia and Hyundai could sell a lot of small pickups if they came out with one. Oh, I forgot-- Honda Ridgeline, which is arguably the best in the segment for most users but looks too much like an Accord for most people to be caught dead in one.
     
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