We've lost the mystery

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by TG, Jul 2, 2020.

  1. TG

    TG Doctor of Teleocity

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    I'm a 1961 baby so I grew up in Canada during the 60s and 70s.
    I remember the thrill of seeing a band play on TV shows and actually seeing the guitars they were using. Getting a new record was a big deal and I'd spend ages poring over the album cover pictures. Getting information about players and bands was like gold dust. Rumours and tantalising tidbits. The Paul is dead thing. What is that voice in tbe background saying? How did they get that guitar sound? Ozzy biting the head off of...something. Jimmy Page apparently being amazing live and...maybe...hearing a terrible bootleg album at a friend's house. Dangerous FM stations playing Zappa and ZZTop late at night. Unmentionable things happening at a Doors concert...? Reading early guitar mags over and over.
    There was so little information and the wondering about it all was magical and mysterious.

    Now we've had the opposite. Too much information. We nearly know what the Beatles and Led Zeppelin had for breakfast each day and at what time and what shoes they were wearing while recording each track. Every instrument track has been isolated and analyzed and we can hear 43 different takes.
    It's been interesting learning all this stuff, but it also is very sad to have that sense of wonder and mystery stripped away.
     
  2. AlbertoMilanese

    AlbertoMilanese Tele-Meister

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    the internet was a mistake.
     
  3. rangercaster

    rangercaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Video killed the radio star ...
     
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  4. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Growing up listening to LP's mostly from OS.... I didn't care much about who all those guys really were in their back yards....

    pictures on sleeves...:)
     
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  5. Elmore

    Elmore Tele-Holic

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    I agree. An album release was an event. I still play my JVC cassette deck to watch the lights as the music plays. And learning from other guitar players was the thing. You always wanted to meet new players to learn. Camping out for concert tickets would always get you great seats. Buy the album, put it on cassette. Put the album away. Who remembers equalizers on car stereos?
     
  6. That Cal Webway

    That Cal Webway Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Nahhh
    Mystery is out there.
     
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  7. Tarkus60

    Tarkus60 TDPRI Member

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    I remember going to the record store every Friday waiting for the release of Physical Graffiti.....and the day it finally arrived. Oh what joyful day it was!
     
  8. EddieLocrian

    EddieLocrian Tele-Afflicted

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    I was the first kid to buy the 12" of 'Atomic' by Blondie in our local town.
    That was a big deal, and it was only a single.

    Ok - Eddie.
     
  9. rangercaster

    rangercaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    We listen to 78 rpm records ..
     
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  10. kennl

    kennl Tele-Afflicted

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    The day that I discovered the first and second issues of Guitar Player magazine at my town library changed my life.
    Imagine. A magazine dedicated to the instrument I played, talking about guitarists from Segovia to Montgomery.
    I became a subscriber and learned much about players who were never mentioned on local AM radio
    With the same attitude of exploration and awe at discovery, we can still seek out some inspiring fellow musicians and their art.
    Just a lot of more chaff to sort through these days.
     
  11. cigarman513

    cigarman513 Tele-Meister

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    I agree, even though I was born in 93..... I still SORTA remember life before internet... Well the internet was there but it didn't play the part of our life it does now. Hell I love using the computer, but I do spend way more time reading about Teles than playing them. Channel surfing to find something good on...

    The thing I can relate to the most is video games, Music was already digital by then..... Back in the early 2000s, I got most of my info about them from magazines, and it was exciting when one came in mail. I don't play too much anymore, but now you know so much about a game, that by the time its out, you don't even need to play it and you don't need to leave your room to buy it!
     
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  12. Shango66

    Shango66 Friend of Leo's

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    1. A buddy of mine came back from New York gave me a bootleg cassette tape of the Jeff Beck Groups Fillmore east gig, he’d pick up in a market. I thought it was awesome to have such a rare recording. Nowadays YouTube has loads of this era gigs, most of which I’ve not listened to as much as that tape.
    2. I searched for a DVD of Stephane Grappelli’s life in Jazz, cause it contained footage of Django Reinhardt playing. Cost me a bomb.within weeks of purchase a buddy told me all that stuff was on the net, free.
    Agree w the OP.
     
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  13. naveed211

    naveed211 Tele-Afflicted

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    I agree, the album listening experience is more or less gone unless you raise young kids on it from childhood, which I suppose is possible with people collecting vinyl. But in general, yes, very different situation.

    I don’t know how many young people (or anyone) really sit down and listen to albums all the way through, and even further take in every part of it (liner notes, the covers, pictures, etc). I always considered myself an “album guy,” but once I got Spotify eight years ago, that’s not true anymore. Just big playlists.

    There are bands out there still taking creative chances and making actual albums, that have artwork and hidden sounds or complexities, but it is fewer and far between.
     
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  14. stxrus

    stxrus Poster Extraordinaire

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    In many ways that is TRUTH. Too much information -true or false, fact or fiction- and the sensory overload to discern the difference to me is a negative. On the other hand having the world, literally, at the touch of a key can be a real positive. Definitely a double edged sword

    Yes, some of the mystery we knew as growing up is gone. Innocence is lost at too early of an age
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2020
  15. Mjark

    Mjark Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I think it has more to do with being young and having little else to focus on than having access to information.
     
  16. Telenator

    Telenator Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    Probably the worst part of all this is that we're simply left to sift through the billshut.
    As someone running internet businesses, I have been so thoroughly misquoted, lied about, misinterpreted and had my words twisted to the extent that only the tiniest thread or original information remained.

    One of my business competitors is perhaps the most diabolical wordsmith of all time and has flooded the internet with such gross misinformation that it will never be completely sorted out. So, just because the information is "out there," doesn't mean it's necessarily good information.

    I'll be long gone before this is ever sorted out. We're still dealing with "too much information," but now we're mired in figuring out if it's actually true. Good luck with that.
     
  17. roknfnrol

    roknfnrol Tele-Holic

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  18. lgherb

    lgherb TDPRI Member

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    Liner notes and more.

    Robert Fripp's "League of Gentlemen" album had a cryptic etching on one side of the disc just outside of the label that stated "The Next Step Is Discipline". My friends and I had no idea what it meant until King Crimson reunited the following year putting out their "Discipline" album...a mastery of how to send messages to the small percentage of the audience that devoured every possible piece of information on an album.

    Making mix cassette tapes of songs that had a connection of dots like the 1st three songs from different artists featuring the same bass player then the next couple of songs being from albums that had the same producer or the same drummer as the last song with said bass player, etc., then challenging your friends to find the common threads between all song transitions.

    What we may have lost is a level of creative curiosity whose appetite was whetted by a lack of data instead of information overload.
     
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  19. roknfnrol

    roknfnrol Tele-Holic

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    I do miss the physical aspect of it, CD and album sleeves etc. But I also love the fact that I do not own a single cassette, CD, or vinyl album. I do not need a room dedicated to all that. I sold all of it years ago and absolutely love Spotify. It easy to discover new bands, almost every day! It's overwhelming how much great new music there is.
     
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  20. KW1977

    KW1977 Tele-Meister

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    I'm of the age to have feet in both eras. I didn't have a PC or regular internet access until I was about 22 or 23('95-'96), and holy cow when I discovered Harmony Central and boutique pedal builders and Ebay? I went nuts.

    On the flip side I do remember the joys of buying physical albums(mostly cassettes, and remember those crazy long CD boxes?), waiting at a local record store until midnight for new releases, the thrill of getting a new guitar magazine in the mail and reading up on gear and techniques(I still have an old trunk full somewhere at my folk's house), and the remaining of mystery of what my heros used.
     
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