Were the good old days really all that good?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by 8trackmind, Jun 30, 2019.

  1. ReverendRevolver

    ReverendRevolver Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    849
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2019
    Location:
    Ohio (Nerk)
    Fool old days are always subjective, and most users on here have a wider scope than I do.

    But in the late 90s, nobody had the internet in my city except for nerdy types and people with hobbies overlapping the nerdy types. So, my house did. When I first started playing, the misinformation was still (somehow) at similar concentration levels as now, even though the sample size of total information was smaller.

    All I miss are not buying stuff when it was cheap and all my income was disposable. In high school I was fascinated by Teiso and other junk varieties of guitar, which could be had for $100 or less on Ebay then (15years ish ago). Before the Black Keys. Also, everyone "knew" SF stuff sucked, so it was quite cheap. But I spent money on other junk, chiefly MTG cards, and while those are quite liquid, I didn't have most of mine by the time I woulda been selling them.
    But a point can be made for any time we weren't all being told we need a handwired amp built last week and a boutique pedal when the Fender I've been using for ages was built in the early 80s and sounds fine, and I'll take my Maxon over something built in a garage that runs $400 on a good day.
    American guitars are more varied now than 15 years ago (as far as Fenders go...) and they started making offsets that run under $1k made in Mexico and Japan. I miss teles from not the US being $300 or less all day, but as I mentioned, I coulda bought more then and didn't, that's on me.

    Subjective. We look back and its natural. But I miss MANY things about the past more than I miss guitar availability....
     
  2. Guitarteach

    Guitarteach Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,567
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2014
    Location:
    UK
    You do have a great choice of gear to play these days as the world burns down.

    Acquire and consume all you can now... the clock is ticking. It can’t last forever.
     
  3. fendrguitplayr

    fendrguitplayr Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    68
    Posts:
    8,943
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2006
    Location:
    Greater Boston
    Back in the day, you worked harder....for everything. Learn songs from records by moving the needle, tried what
    sounded good to you (amp settings, pedals, etc)....memorized everything (no iPads, phones) but I think in the end
    you felt good because you achieved things.
     
  4. 1293

    1293 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,286
    Joined:
    May 18, 2006

    I'm with you. Texas has a lot of of big cities. I live in NY. We have one big city, but only a handfull with more than 50k. My town is bigger than Manhattan with only a few thousand residents. You can't spit without hitting a dairy cow.
     
    ravindave_3600 likes this.
  5. Masmus

    Masmus TDPRI Member

    Age:
    51
    Posts:
    47
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2018
    Location:
    San Jose
    In most ways this is how i feel but the reality is a little different for me. I hate being tied to the phone but I like the convenience of getting a hold of my family quickly. Or if I could have had youtube when I was learning to play and using the internet to find impossible to find items easily.

    The Marshall stack I bought in 79 in 2018 dollars is around $5500, if I had put it in the DOW today it would be $16,000. A hand full of vintage guitars have done that well but most quality vintage gear has just held its value, lets be honest investment is not the reason most of us buy vintage gear. Most of the top quality gear was out of the reach for most teenagers.

    The price of decent equipment today is astonishingly low when inflation is factored in. i love how things were when I grew up but today is truly a great time to be young and starting out.
     
  6. 1293

    1293 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,286
    Joined:
    May 18, 2006

    The DOW might not be the best benchmark. I have a 401k fund from a job I left in 2003. It's up 500% since then.
     
  7. Guitarteach

    Guitarteach Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,567
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2014
    Location:
    UK
    I got all the guitar magazines with the main shop addresses and then took trips and long drives to try out and get gear. Later on they had CDs with reviews and practice stuff. Plenty of info. and plenty of places.

    There is only a tiny fraction of the stores I spent my youth in left now.
     
  8. eddy b.

    eddy b. TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    41
    Joined:
    May 16, 2015
    Location:
    New Orleans
    No.
     
  9. Nick Fanis

    Nick Fanis Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    5,098
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2003
    Location:
    Athens-GREECE
    if by "the good old days" you mean the 60s this is how I remember them in Greece:

    There was no electricity, running water and telephone in 80% of the country.

    When I was growing up there were very few cars even in Athens.
    Which was problematic because there was no public transportation either.

    We got a TV when I was 8 (black and white of course) but the only TV station we had (state owned of course) transmitted from 14.00-21.00

    Guitars and amps?

    WHAT guitars and amps?

    Give me 2019 everyday and twice on Sundays.
     
  10. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    19,634
    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2008
    Location:
    Detroit
    Yes. This.
     
    StrangerNY likes this.
  11. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

    Age:
    62
    Posts:
    65,801
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Location:
    Austin, Tx
    I remember mine fondly.
    I’m grateful for the long, interesting, and largely happy life I’ve lived, and the period of time (1957- ?) I’ve been alive.
    To quote Merle Haggard, “I’ve had a beautiful time.”
    The good old days were truly!
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2019
    RoyBGood and JL_LI like this.
  12. Telecaster88

    Telecaster88 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    51
    Posts:
    271
    Joined:
    May 9, 2019
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    On the one hand, thanks to the internet and sites like this, I've learned more about guitars, gear, playing tips etc in the last two years than I did in the previous thirty.

    On the other hand, back then I had one guitar, one amp, maybe not the best, but I learned to make them work for me. I picked up new techniques from watching guitarists onstage, or sharing tips with friends, but mostly I learned on my own via experimenting and trial and error. The net effect of which is I learned to play and sound like myself. For which I'm very grateful.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2019
    2 Headed Goat, aging_rocker and kbold like this.
  13. radiocaster

    radiocaster Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,674
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2015
    Location:
    europe
    You could have just looked up the local ones. They were in the phone book.
     
  14. Guitarteach

    Guitarteach Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,567
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2014
    Location:
    UK
    Oh I knew and hung out in all the local ones... but if I wanted a Mesa Boogie I had to go to the UK distributor.
     
    radiocaster likes this.
  15. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    25,993
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2008
    Location:
    Port Moody, BC
    One day, this decade will be viewed as the "Good old days." It's all relative. For me, my first two decades of life were very difficult. The next two decades had periods of success and long periods of challenge. Since turning 40, though, life has been great, except for that time I nearly died. That wasn't so good. But other than that, the last two decades have been awesome.
     
  16. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    41,139
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Location:
    Bakersfield
    I like ALL of the THINGS available to us today. Would I like to live in Bakersfield in 1969? The population was around 65,000, it was a heck of a lot cleaner. There were NO homeless, you could find a job in a day. There were a lot of NICE stores in Bakersfield. If you haven't lived without being connected to everyone every where you have no idea how free it felt. Is there a place like that anywhere today? I doubt it. It's like the movie "Yesterday" though, you can't change the past, unless of course you believe the Beatles never existed. The world population has doubled since 1969. Bakersfield's population today is almost six times what it was in 1969. It's a good thing for everyone the world's population increase hasn't kept pace with Bakersfield's.

    If the published percentage of 65% of crime being committed by one percent of the population, then our criminal population has seen a goodly increase in numbers too. I'm pretty sure no matter where you live in Bakersfield, it would be impossible to store the anchor to the Queen Mary for more than forty eight hours in a vacant lot without someone figuring out a way to steal it. The pawn shop that bought it would swear that the person they got it from had the proper documentation, but has at the present been misplaced.
     
  17. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    41,139
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Location:
    Bakersfield
    I'm pretty sure that Bill Gates when he's relaxing comfortably his 66,000 square foot humble abode would agree with you that the last thirty years have been pretty good!
     
  18. JL_LI

    JL_LI Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    2,625
    Joined:
    May 20, 2017
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    I like Brookdale Bill’s perspective. IMO, and this is only opinion, there was a lot to like about the times and places when and where I was growing up. There were horrible things back then too but this isn’t a political forum. I got married in the ‘70s and really settled into a career in the ‘80s. A lot to like and a lot to detest about those times too. With all that to look back on, I’m doing OK now. I can afford the gear I like. I’ve been to places I never dreamed of visiting in my college days. And quantum mechanics is no longer a mystery.

    I remember my son starting on his PhD at Texas A&M. He couldn’t believe the wasteland he was put down in. My advice to him was, “Find what to like. You’ll be here for a while.” That’s how I try to approach living through these times. Modern medicine is better but more expensive. I need it and can afford it. There’ll be an election in 2020 but I’m not fool enough to believe that any of them voted in will be able to fix all that’s wrong here. So I’m back to finding what to like. Were the good old days better? Are these modern times better? Yes and no. Were either all that good? Now that all depends on perspective.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2019
  19. Harry Styron

    Harry Styron Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,545
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2011
    Location:
    Branson, Mo
    When I was in my 40s, twenty years ago, I started wondering about whether there was a better time to live. I read a couple of books that opened my eyes.

    One was “ Land of Desire,” by historian William Leach, which indicated that the decline of traditional social and family life started in the late 1890s, not the 1960s and was related to the increased availability of consumer goods, which resulted from technological innovations.

    The other was “The Way We Never Were,” by sociologist Stephanie Koontz, which suggested that our views of family life, shaped by the fictional Walton and Nelson families on television, were not supported by data.
     
    JL_LI and Paul in Colorado like this.
  20. P Thought

    P Thought Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    9,610
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    Plundertown (Gasville) OR
    I pretty well sit in the mix with the old stuff most of the time personally, but I agree with you: there is excellent music being made now, and probably lots of it.
     
    blowtorch likes this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.