1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Well, it seems I will be preforming in front of people on Friday - never have done that before.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Throttleneck, Mar 14, 2017.

  1. Brian Wright

    Brian Wright Tele-Meister

    Age:
    49
    Posts:
    252
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2015
    Location:
    Cypress, TX
    Oh yeah and one more thing, if someone comes up later and says you did great then just say thanks. It took me a long time to learn how to accept a compliment instead of launching into a long list of things I did wrong. Most people don't know the difference anyway and it just makes the moment awkward. Just say thank you!
     
  2. ricknbaker

    ricknbaker Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,278
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2014
    Location:
    Watford, UK
    I usually stick to soft drinks until I'm on stage, then I have a pint handy.
    Have a pee before you go on. Check hair, flies, teeth etc in the mirror afterwards.
    Look up and out. Keep smiling. Don't look down at your shoes.
    Don't worry about making a mistake. Most punters won't even notice.
    Make sure whatever guitar you're playing is tuned up and in good shape. I always have a spare on a stand, but if you're only doing one number you'll just have to press on if you break a string.
    If you use a pick, have a spare you can get to quickly. I gaffer a couple to the top of my amp.

    And enjoy yourself. That's what it's all about. Think 'I am a showman'
     
    JustABluesGuy likes this.
  3. unfamous

    unfamous Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    437
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Location:
    North Georgia
    I think all the "drink" comments are aimed at encouraging you to relax. If you have other methods like deep breathing, visualization, cognitive tricks or what have you, they may be a better choice.
     
  4. 1955

    1955 Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    10,316
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2010
    Location:
    .
    Drinking to loosen up prior to stage performance is a crutch that becomes a double edged sword.

    It kills your natural coping mechanisms to everyday stressors, but also numbs your awareness of your audience and the neutral-reality platform of that relationship.

    Resisting the urge to rely on self-defeating comforters will ultimately make you a much better performer.

    It is quite easy to overlook situational cues that when sober could greatly assist you in the give and take with the audience, it also can give you a false impression of the quality of your performance in real-time, where on-the-fly adjustments can be critical to the tone of the performance.

    Audience members are also turned off by the tell-tale false security and amateurish posturing that comes with chemically reduced inhibition and dumbed-down euphoria. They will welcome you as a breath of fresh air if you are just yourself, first time onstage or not.

    The kicker is that they will play along with intoxicated performers unfortunately perhaps as penance for their own indulgence, and also because numb ears and eyes are apathetic, despite the requisite learned social revelry response common in the bar/brewery psychology.

    A sharp (sensory) performer has a unique opportunity to connect because of the ability to see past the wobbling facades and search out the basic human needs that scream under the muffled murmurs and glassy heartbreaks.

    Go cold, go bold, do it every time, allow yourself to fail and question and be completely vulnerable, in this is the courage that translates to charisma, because it relies only upon your essence as a human being, your personality, your unique gifts.

    Keep in mind also that the tone of your performance will attract a certain type of audience. You get what you ask for, so ask for a real audience, ask for an audience that cares by caring yourself and you'll do fine.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017
    teleaddicted likes this.
  5. ecoast

    ecoast Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    839
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2017
    Location:
    NWNJ
    your song
    your 'band'
    you've done this before in another life
    you've got this

    'just do it'


    maybe wear a cape
     
    Darkness, MisterZ and RoyalBaby like this.
  6. unfamous

    unfamous Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    437
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Location:
    North Georgia

    I'm gonna try the cape thing....
     
    ecoast likes this.
  7. gtrjunior

    gtrjunior Tele-Holic

    Age:
    48
    Posts:
    663
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2016
    Location:
    NorthEast U.S.
    Being nervous is part of the experience. It's a good thing. It keeps you sharp and focused. I've been performing for 20 years and still get nervous just before stage time. 30 seconds in, the nerves are gone.
     
    MisterZ and JustABluesGuy like this.
  8. JustABluesGuy

    JustABluesGuy Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    63
    Posts:
    2,971
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2016
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    You reminded me of a similar trick. Find (at least) one person in the audience (if you aren't too blinded by the stage lights) that looks like a friendly, attentive listener and look mostly at those people and play "for" them.

    I have been "both" of the people on this situation.

    Before I started playing I was an attentive listener that players often made eye contact with (that's assuming I wasn't sitting right under the exit sign they were staring at!). This only works at fairly intimate places, but it sounds like this is one them.

    For an example, I saw SRV in '82 at the old Antone's on Guadalupe. We got there really early and we're right up front. I was a very attentive listener with a muciscal background and he made eye contact with me regularly.

    One particular moment I remember was when he was doing some intricate arpeggios that were obviously difficult, but that didn't "sound" difficult to most people.

    Folks applauded wildly for fairly simple (but dramatic sounding) licks, like wide bends, and rapid trills.

    When he did less dramatic but "technically" more difficult licks, I was one of the few in the audience that seemed to appreciate the difficulty, and let him know that by my response. I know he appreciated it, because he made eye contact with me (or 'maybe' the exit sign!) and smiled knowingly.

    He continued to make fairly regular eye contact with me during the show, and we even chatted a bit during their break.

    It was far from his first gig. He was already the most famous guitar player in Austin, but he obviously still appreciated an especially attentive, "discerning" audience member.

    I like to think that I helped him by "feeding him" as well as one person among many can. Obviously, virtually everyone in the crowd was feeding him, and I'm sure he made eye contact with many others, so I'm not that special or anything, but it is a good example of how the interplay between the performer and the audience can work.
     
    Throttleneck, jvanginkel and 1955 like this.
  9. Stringbanger

    Stringbanger Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    26,544
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2013
    Location:
    West O' Philly, PA
    I started playing acoustic guitar in 1978, when I was 23. Four years later, and still a hack, I was playing in front of people.

    A new bar opened up in a town near me, and they needed live entertainment. They supplied the PA and mikes, so all you had to do was show up with your guitar. They didn't pay me, but I could have all the free beers I wanted. They must have liked me, because I was asked back many times over the next 2-3 years, and I was later joined by a buddy. He sucked worse than me, but we didn't care, we were having a blast.

    Just be yourself. Take a couple deep ones before you go on. A beer or two is not gonna hurt, unless that is over your limit.
    Run with it!
     
  10. Otis Fine

    Otis Fine Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    1,238
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2016
    Location:
    Chicago, Illinois
    That's awesome! When he hands you the Hummingbird, run.
     
    ricknbaker likes this.
  11. Cesspit

    Cesspit Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    833
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2014
    Location:
    Oxfordshire England
    Go for it buddy. Do relax, one beer helps. This is your song and your moment so take it. Play the song like you mean it, boldly. Let your teacher play alone side you, not the other way round, he's got the experience so he should fit in around you. And most of all enjoy it. Audience appreciation is one of the best (free) drugs going but beware, it is very addictive.
    Good luck
     
    JustABluesGuy likes this.
  12. lil scotty

    lil scotty Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    451
    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2016
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    Get inside of the song. You wrote it for a reason. You've played it for your instructor, and maybe some others, so you believe in it. Do that song justice. Practice it enough to know you've got it down cold. People will react to you believing in what you've created. This was/is my way of dealing with this kind of anxiety. I'm not a natural "performer" but focusing on "the song" gets me where I need to go.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017
    JustABluesGuy likes this.
  13. AdamL

    AdamL TDPRI Member

    Age:
    56
    Posts:
    30
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2016
    Location:
    Texas
    All the best of luck to you. You'll find its over way too fast, and the next gig can't come fast enough. I'm sure your instructor will talk you up to the crowd and get them on your side when he calls you up. That feels good.
     
    JustABluesGuy likes this.
  14. Mississippi_Kid

    Mississippi_Kid Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    335
    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2016
    Location:
    Hinterlands, USA
    Make sure an extra pick is in easy grabbing distance if you need one. I perfectly flipped my only pick into the guitar's sound hole once at a church performance. I had to take the guitar off (on stage) and shake it around to drop the pick out. I lived.

    Perspective - most people won't care/notice/remember you even were up there.
     
    JustABluesGuy likes this.
  15. RLee77

    RLee77 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,350
    Joined:
    May 15, 2016
    Location:
    Nevada
    Just follow this guy's example and it'll be fine:
     
  16. Fiesta Red

    Fiesta Red Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,269
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Location:
    Texas
    Breathe.

    So many people forget to take a long, deep breath before they start playing/singing/moving, and they will stumble right out of the blocks.

    I started pausing and taking a deep breath before several activities which require relaxed concentration (playing guitar, singing, playing harmonica, shooting a gun), and my performance/accuracy improved drastically.

    Just Breathe...
     
    String Tree and MisterZ like this.
  17. Teleguy61

    Teleguy61 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,436
    Joined:
    May 17, 2010
    Location:
    Eastern Massachusetts
    Absolutely go for it.
    Being on stage is the best thing going.
     
    JustABluesGuy likes this.
  18. JustABluesGuy

    JustABluesGuy Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    63
    Posts:
    2,971
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2016
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Yeah, as much as I have wanted to puke before a live performance, it feels great aftward, usually.

    The only time it didn't feel that great afterward was when a guy I work with wanted me to do an acoustic open mic with him. I had written a couple of Freddy Green inspired chord progressions and he wanted to play lead over them at it.

    It was a disaster! I didn't really want to do it, not really feeling ready. He didn't want to practice at all. Not even a once through. He listened to me play them, and said he'd be "all over them!"

    Anyway, we get to the open mic, and we are both hooked up to the PA, but I had a passive under saddle pup and didn't have a pre-amp (I didn't know!) and they couldn't get my level up enough for me, or anyone else to hear me.

    I got through the first couple of turnarounds by feel alone, and then realized he wasn't doing anything! He looked like a deer in the headlights. He mouthed "I got nothin'" and that was that.

    We weren't ready, and it was a disaster, but it still felt good to try, and it was quite a learning experience. Oh, and the crowd was really nice and we even got some confused, polite applause.

    It was worse for the other guy. He had his whole posse of friends there with him. I was flying solo and didn't know anyone there.

    This won't happen to you because you are prepared. We weren't.
     
  19. Throttleneck

    Throttleneck Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,577
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    Location:
    Northern New Mexico
    Thanks again everyone. I love the stories and the advice. I will definitely let you all know how it goes. I am still kind of cycling through emotions. Glad I don't have weeks to think about it. :)
     
    JustABluesGuy and Felino like this.
  20. sean79

    sean79 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,123
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2005
    Location:
    northcentral/western Pennsylvania
    How'd it go?
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.