water supply in your area......

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by doctorunderhill, May 17, 2020.

  1. tery

    tery Doctor of Teleocity

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    Tennessee water is as good as any and better than most .
     
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  2. Phrygian77

    Phrygian77 Tele-Afflicted

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    Our water is supposed to be very good, at least for drinking, because of the Floridan aquifer system. Yes, it's fairly hard. Growing up in Tallahassee, water quality was never an issue. However, after moving south of town, I've had several issues over the last 15 years with the local water. This is just the latest example...

    IMG_20200315_170005.jpg
     
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  3. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    We have this Cabin in a failed subdivision, and so our household in the only thing on the well pump. The downside is, we have to pay the power bill on the well pump - which is consistently under $ 30 a month so I'm cool. We're talking the mountains of far western North Carolina, spitting distance from the Tennessee state line.

    The cars come out (from washing) about as clean and spotless and I'd experienced living anywhere. But leave a tub full of water and there's a bit of sediment that'll appear after 24 hours. I guess I'll break down and install a filter at some point, so we can drink crazy amounts of this water. I hate to say it but a substantial percentage of the tap water we consume is ice cubes, tea, and juice concentrate made with this water. I just had got out of the habit of drinking huge amounts of water in New Orleans (given that the River is your source and that's the dumping ground of so many chemical plants and hog farms, etc.)
     
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  4. 985plowboy

    985plowboy Friend of Leo's

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    Artesian well right outside the kitchen window.
     
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  5. 41144

    41144 Tele-Afflicted

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    Almost on my doorstep we have the Frankley Reservoirs which bring top quality water direct from Wales's Elan Valley via the Elan Viaduct to Birmingham.
    A superb feat of British, late Victorian, engineering delivering possibly the softest-cleanest water imaginable.
    Although not quite on the scale of a Roman Pont du Gard... a big thanks to the city fathers of the 1890s/1900s for both making the investment and their grand designs.

    Which is all great until you visit say Yorkshire or London etc.
    Still formmidably clean water, of course, but the taste buds are immediately assailed by the mineral content. Saying that I do appreciate that the correct balance of some minerals in water can also add to its flavour.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2020
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  6. doctorunderhill

    doctorunderhill Tele-Meister

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    trust me it ain't that bright. at one time this county had the highest per capita sex offenders of the 254 counties in texas.
    not sure if that still stands, but would not be surprised.
    I moved from a town with 80,000+ people to an area that with the surrounding area is maybe 9,000. I used to say I raised the IQ in 2 cities- longview when I left and gilmer when I got there.
     
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  7. AJBaker

    AJBaker Friend of Leo's

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    Great water here straight from the mountains. It's basically the same as Evian mineral water, which is just a few mountains west of us.
     
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  8. doctorunderhill

    doctorunderhill Tele-Meister

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    oh man. what I wouldn't give to sit out at your place and talk guitars over a cold beer.
     
  9. muchxs

    muchxs Doctor of Teleocity

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  10. String Tree

    String Tree Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Our water up here is ok.
    We do have to revert to store bought when the Blue Algea blooms in our Water Supply.
     
  11. AJBaker

    AJBaker Friend of Leo's

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    Let us know if you're ever in the area!
     
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  12. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Sky water straight from the clouds.... beautiful...:)

    it's raining today, topping it up for me.:)

    tank overflows2.jpg
     
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  13. JL_LI

    JL_LI Friend of Leo's

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    The water where I live is OK for now, OK, that is, unless the plume spreads to the west. There are three acquirers under Long Island. We get our water from the middle one. Those on the southernmost edge get their water from the deepest one. The uppermost acquirer has been reduced to brine as a result of being pumped to near depletion. The acquifer my community uses has been polluted by a defense contractor that flushed industrial degreasers through a septic system. The contractor and the navy have been trying to shift the cost of the cleanup elsewhere for 40 years. It’s hard to imagine that a region that once had three healthy acquirers will run out of clean water. I guess that’s the price of freedom, and landing a man on the moon.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2020
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  14. Flaneur

    Flaneur Friend of Leo's

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    The water here is so good, folks from all over the world are happy to pay £50 and up, for a bottle.

    The nearest Distillery is 6 miles from my house.

    ;):cool:
     
  15. dan1952

    dan1952 Friend of Leo's

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    We live in the country, and have a fairly shallow well. The water is full of manganese, which imparts a greyish color and a rotten egg odor. A water softener makes it usable for laundry and bathing, but we don't drink it. We only use bottled water for consumption. We are surrounded by farm fields, and don't trust the chemical run-off. Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get you...
     
  16. stxrus

    stxrus Friend of Leo's

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    We are on a cistern. Collect rainwater from the roof and store in our “basement”. Full, I have 42,000 gallons of rainwater that is filtered with 2 sediment filters, a charcoal filter and a UV filter. Being that it is rainwater it is very soft water. Very little minerals, salts, or anything that can create hard water.
    Soap is really sudsy and takes a lot of water to rinse off. So we typically use less soap in the laundry & dishwasher
    There is municipal supplied to some areas and they have problems. Old lines with frequent breaks calling for a boiling alert before using
     
  17. doctorunderhill

    doctorunderhill Tele-Meister

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    that is a tough scenario. back in my college days i studied the dynamics of settlement from the early Dutch settlement of the lower Hudson Valley through 19th century New York. the period of years in which there has been non Native habitation is mind blowing to someone from an area whose history only extends back to just prior to the Civil War.
    there has been an intense concentration of population in your area for an incredible length of time. from the days of the Old Collect on so many people competing for resources of all kinds and it's affect over hundreds of years. the draw on underground water reserves coupled with years of exposure to chemicals- from back in the days of tanneries, smelters, and other industries who had little to no restraints on the use/disposal of waste by-products.
    it is a sobering thought when you start going "up stream" and realize to what extent the land has been abused. it is in my area. when you think of the fact you guys have been there nearly 400 years there is no telling what the ground/water table has been exposed to over that length of time
     
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  18. DrPepper

    DrPepper Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    It's clear but, we filter everything we use for drinking/eating...
     
  19. kingofdogs1950

    kingofdogs1950 Tele-Afflicted

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    https://www.ewg.org/tapwater/

    I looked up my area (77856) for water quality.
    Looks like the water is going to give me cancer.
    Oh, wait. I already had leukemia before I moved here. Too late.
    Actually, I don't drink the local water. It smells like it is piped in from the local municipal swimming pool. Lots of chlorine.

    Mark
     
  20. JL_LI

    JL_LI Friend of Leo's

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    Welcome to the flask. Back in college, a biology prof started an experiment. He inoculated a flask of liquid culture medium with a pure bacterial culture. We sampled it each lab and watched it grow withdrawing a drop and examinations it under a microscope. Somewhere along the way the culture got contaminated. Over time the flask began to get overgrown. The populations of bacteria changed and began to die off. The flask began to stink. Bacteria that lived off the detritus took over until they died out. 15 week’s into the semester, the prof explained that this is how life on earth ends. All resources are consumed until a species that lives off the waste takes over until there is nothing left to support life. It’s curious that almost all of the students in the class thought the prof had listed a little too far to port which only shows how otherwise intelligent people can be willfully ignorant. 50 years later, we’re still here. 50 years from now, maybe. 150 years from now? The probability keeps getting smaller.
     
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