1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Was SRV the first to have SRV tone?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by sax4blues, Jan 25, 2021.

  1. sax4blues

    sax4blues Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,591
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2006
    Location:
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Today I watched another “How to get SRV tone” YouTube. Strat, loud clean American style amp, TubeScreamer,....

    Pretty basic right, no secret sauce. So made me wonder was SRV the first player to use that combination, and therefore create the SRV tone?
     
    That Cal Webway likes this.
  2. blue17

    blue17 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    26
    Posts:
    244
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2020
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    Well the TS808 didn't come out until the late 70's and Dumbles weren't their own amps until the 80s, so certainly he was probably the first to make the sound popular.
     
    guitrr likes this.
  3. EsquireBoy

    EsquireBoy Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    40
    Posts:
    2,064
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2019
    Location:
    Paris, France
    When I hear SRV (and I’m not his biggest fan I must admit), I mostly hear his right hand. To me that’s really what made him sound like himself.
    I know it’s a bit of a cliché to say, but his signature tone was really in his hands IMHO.
     
    guitrr, choops, StevesBoogie and 11 others like this.
  4. 985plowboy

    985plowboy Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,658
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2012
    Location:
    South Louisiana
    Maybe.
    He was not the first to play many of those licks but he made them his own.
    If someone else did run across that tone before him, they didn’t do much with it.
     
  5. notroHnhoJ

    notroHnhoJ Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    345
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2015
    Location:
    St. Louis Mo.
    I kind of dont think so. I remember when he arrived on the scene, the sound of his guitar was super super distinctive. Nobody and I mean nobody was flogging that front stratocaster pickup in such a fashion. Maybe his brother and other select Texans, but it was unique for sure.
     
  6. Chiogtr4x

    Chiogtr4x Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    9,349
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2007
    Location:
    Manassas Park, VA
    I've heard Dave Alvin from the Blasters with that similar Strat into cranked big clean Super Reverb that predates SRV.

    But a more Chuck Berry, R&R style - great musician, Dave!

    Also in a similar vein early David Hidalgo/ Los Lobos ( he later got more distorted and experimental) ,
    and the guitar from the Paladins

    Just pointing out some strong, no frills rockers
     
  7. notroHnhoJ

    notroHnhoJ Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    345
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2015
    Location:
    St. Louis Mo.
    You know, thinking about SRV and his tone, I think he might owe a quite a bit of that “tone” to Robin Trower. That may be who he really sounds like.
     
  8. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

    Age:
    63
    Posts:
    91,453
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Location:
    Austin, Tx
    Though his tone proudly shows his influences, he did have a great, signature tone.
    He was wonderfully relentless, and his gear could keep up with his creative force.
    I’m glad I saw/heard him play.
    I actually like his singing as much as his playing.
    He was stylish, but never jive.
     
    guitrr, Big_Bend, E5RSY and 9 others like this.
  9. notroHnhoJ

    notroHnhoJ Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    345
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2015
    Location:
    St. Louis Mo.
    Yeah good call, Dave Alvin does that “thing” as well.
     
  10. thunderbyrd

    thunderbyrd Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Age:
    62
    Posts:
    7,633
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2004
    Location:
    central ky
    SRV: Vibrato, Vibrato, Vibrato. even on rhythm guitar.

    that's what i hear when i listen close on good headphones.
     
    guitrr and StevesBoogie like this.
  11. deytookerjaabs

    deytookerjaabs Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,513
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2015
    Location:
    Nashville
    Yes...and no, lol.

    He's damn close to what I think is live Albert King tone from '60-'72 or so (problem is, not enough live albert king recordings from the 60's), detuned heavy crunch with some funky honk.

    Total Albert King.

    However, his actual playing style is closer to shuffle and boogie woogie than to the classic bluesmen which might sound odd, but it's all in his syncopation. The way his right hand just stays on the boogie whack a chunk left hand piano thing although had it's roots in many 50's Memphis rockers he put that playing on steroids. And, landing on the damn downbeat all the time, lol.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2021
    guitrr, rze99, goonie and 5 others like this.
  12. Fiesta Red

    Fiesta Red Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,263
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Location:
    Texas
    Yes and no.

    SRV sounded a lot like Albert King...and Jimi Hendrix...and Hubert Sumlin...and Lonnie Mack...and...

    You get the point.

    SRV added and removed things from his rig throughout his career.

    So many people make a huge deal out of his “TS808 and two 1964 Vibroverbs” rig, forgetting that the 808 was stolen fairly early on and he often used the “lesser” (other people’s opinions, not mine) TS10...

    Also, he later got the Dumble(s) and the Marshall Town & Country amps...

    His rig changed, but his sound/tone/whatever didn’t, at least not significantly. Listen to “In The Beginning” (pre-“Texas Flood” live radio show, with Jackie Newhouse on the Fender Bass) and then “In Step” (amongst his final recordings with Double Trouble) and then “Family Style”...and he still sounds exactly like Stevie Ray Vaughan, every time.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2021
  13. notroHnhoJ

    notroHnhoJ Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    345
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2015
    Location:
    St. Louis Mo.
    I’m going to throw this out there, and I may be completely wrong, but in my opinion, that “SRV thing” is something you have to be born west of the Mississippi River to really do.
     
  14. Zepfan

    Zepfan Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    10,576
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2013
    Location:
    Horn Lake, MS
    When it came to SRV's playing and sound, I always thought of Robin Trower playing through a Fender amp instead of the Marshall stack.
     
  15. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    48,140
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Location:
    Bakersfield
    Oh man, evabody know it was da hat. It poured out of the hat right into his head, down his neck, out through his shoulders down his arms, and into his hands. It was the hat though, the hat.
     
  16. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,947
    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2011
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    I don't find his tone all that distinctive. It just sounds like a classic Fender. If you've ever beat on one loud through a big American amp, that's just how they sound. Put it in front of a corny, modern sounding, plodding, Disneyland-esque caricature of "a Texas blues band," and you have the SRV sound.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2021
    chickenwire likes this.
  17. burntfrijoles

    burntfrijoles Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,354
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2010
    Location:
    Somewhere Over The Rainbow
    Doesn’t really matter, he owns it in the majority of folk’s minds.
    He could have employed any tone and still sounded great. Listen to his cover of Little Wing. It’s obviously very Hendrixy.

    There was a time when I was infatuated with SRV but not any longer. I rarely, if ever listen to him now. I may have played his music so much that it became cliche’ to me or my tastes just changed.
     
    BluesGuitarMart and Danb541 like this.
  18. PastorJay

    PastorJay Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,924
    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2014
    Location:
    California
    I'm not sure there's one particular "SRV tone." I've heard live recordings where his guitar sounds great. And some where it sounds grating.

    I know he used different amps, Bassman, Marshalls, Dumbles, Twins, Super Reverbs, etc. He also played different Strats. Were the pickups different?

    His style was really distinctive--and I'll agree with those who suggested it was largely due his right hand technique. But I don't always love his tone.

    I don't know if it was the different amps or something else that affected the tone from time to time. But it wasn't always the same.
     
    thunderbyrd likes this.
  19. Guitardvark

    Guitardvark Tele-Afflicted Platinum Supporter

    Posts:
    1,379
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2012
    Location:
    houston
    the real stevie tone IMO came from the studio where his techs had him setup. stevies tone came from the skill of the techs who could re create stevies tones that he heard in his head and was able to emulate them in real time :)

    great guitar players always have some of the best techs in the world. if they dont then they arent that good..
     
    guitrr likes this.
  20. deytookerjaabs

    deytookerjaabs Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,513
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2015
    Location:
    Nashville

    Down 1/2 step constantly in the in-between positions with a fat sounding setup is absolutely "SRV" once the playing becomes in his style.


    No one ever confuses a regular tuned up Clapton in the 70's with SRV....even though their gear was so similar.
     
    guitrr and SRHmusic like this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.