Warped Neck on a 68

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by Bartholomew3, May 4, 2016.

  1. Bartholomew3

    Bartholomew3 Friend of Leo's

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    It's back-bowed and loosening the truss-rod almost fixes it. Body has been re-finished way back mostly because we were buying them for approx $280 case included & didn't know we were doing our gigs with vintage instruments. Neck pickup blew so I put a set of Area T in a couple of years back while deciding what to do with it.

    A set of .11 pulled the neck back into line slightly but not quite enough.

    Can it be fixed or will a new Fender neck fit a vintage 68 ? Is there some way to un-warp the 68 original neck with heat ? I would have it done by a pro.
     

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    Last edited: May 4, 2016
  2. philosofriend

    philosofriend Tele-Holic

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    Put some 12s on it or tune what you've got up one or two half-steps. (Loosen the truss rod.) Let the sun shine on it on a hot sunny day. Stay with the guitar and turn it over every five minutes. If the sun is hot enough to make you want to turn yourself every five minutes then it is hot enough to warp the neck. After an hour the neck should be better. If not, find a repairman who has warped necks before. It is not hard to do, but the difference between enough heat and too much is delicate.
     
    Iron Broadsword likes this.
  3. KokoTele

    KokoTele Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    philosofriend's method will probably work reasonably well. I do it with a stiff board, clamps, and 75 watt bulbs for heat.

    If you do take it to someone, just tell them your neck is backbowed. Using the term "warped" really implies something else with a neck.
     
    Wally likes this.
  4. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Just out of curiosity was it ever re-fretted? Sometimes the wrong sized tang on the fretwire can make a neck back-bow. (That and somebody years ago mistakenly thinking the trussrod would lower the action, and the next owner was afraid to check or loosen the trussrod for too many years - I saw that unfortunate result on a '69 Les Paul).

    But yes, back-bow can usually be treated with heat and gentle pressure by people who have done it before.
     
  5. netgear69

    netgear69 Tele-Afflicted

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    I fixed a Bass neck with a back bow the method i used is not for the faint hearted
    loosen the russ rod !
    1# maple block under the headstock 1# maple block under the heel sheet of A4 paper on the center of the fingerboard place a steam iron on the paper to catch most of the moisture
    let it steam for about 1 minute then clamp it in the middle leave enough room to get a straight edge on it slowly pressure the clamp until the board is straight with the straight edge
    and leave it for 24 hours
    it worked for me maybe i got lucky
     
  6. Iron Broadsword

    Iron Broadsword Tele-Meister

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    Oi, hope you get it resolved. My 68 is starting to go into an S shape, where it starts to bow backwards at the first few frets. I hope this is not the case with yours, as it is not easy to detect.. I'm told it may be possible to fix it but not a guarantee.. worth the effort IMHO but definitely not something I would ever attempt. If I can't adjust the truss rod to fix it, it goes to somebody more qualified than me!
     
  7. Bartholomew3

    Bartholomew3 Friend of Leo's

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    Mine was re-fretted way back and has been in U-Haul trailers at 40 below zero plus in the baggage hold on planes across the Atlantic. Has fallen down a flight of stairs in a club and been dented a few times. Life on the road takes it's toll.

    I wouldn't work on it personally for that type of job. There are a couple of Fender Custom-Shop authorized repair guys in town so I'll probably have it done by one of them. Will probably be more $$$ than the guitar cost in 68 when I bought it.
     
    Iron Broadsword likes this.
  8. cabra velha

    cabra velha Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    On this you can rely.

    I think I've avoided this issue by living in a dry climate most of my life, although there was one SG 200 (I think that was what it was called) that I actually got a deal on because it had such a wicked bow.
     
  9. KokoTele

    KokoTele Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    An S-curve isn't all that uncommon, and shouldn't be the biggest deal in the world to resolve. Depending on the degree of curve, it can be taken care ofeither with compression fretting or the heating and clamping method. It just takes a little longer than a regular curve.

    If we're just talking about the neck, the repair shouldn't be outlandish. Costs might add up if it's time for a refret too, but it shouldn't start to look like a mortgage payment.
     
    Iron Broadsword likes this.
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