Warmoth Parts

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by Vanzant, Jun 7, 2013.

  1. dsutton24

    dsutton24 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Warmoth parts are good, USACG are very good... Either will sell you parts that fit, and work with you if something goes wrong.

    My colleague Tuxedo Poly's advice is the same advice I always give somebody who wants to learn. Buy a used guitar that's all there (or mostly there :cool:) and experiment with it. Mod it, grind it, sand it, abuse it and make it work. And most of all, learn to solder. If it goes well you'll learn a lot, if it doesn't go well you can always sell of the parts and start over.

    You can buy used Squiers these days for a hundred bucks, and if it has problems it can be had for a song.
     
  2. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

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    This is absolutely superb advice. I did this over and over with Squiers, and with inexpensive Fenders until I had reduced the odds I would ruin expensive guitar parts to dead minimum. It takes you through the decision making process over and over, so you don't get "surprised" by these boutique parts when you open the packing box. You'll already be primed to make all the best decisions and you will have all the tools you need in hand already and won't be tempted to forge ahead with the wrong tools (or untested methods) and mess something up.
     
  3. chipbutty24

    chipbutty24 Friend of Leo's

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    You clearly have an axe to grind with Warmoth. My point is that the fact they are not the same as Fender isn't as relevant as you seem to think. No one is forcing Warmoth product on anyone. If ya don't like it, ya don't have to buy it. Live and let live right?
     
  4. PJ55

    PJ55 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Never used one of their bodies. But I have used their necks. And, I can't imagine any aftermarket necks being any better. The fit and finish are Custom Shop Quality (IMO). That being said, I don't have any first-hand experience with Tommy at USACG. And, I hear (really) good things about their necks. Just never been too keen to reshape and refinish the peghead.
     
  5. Rothmans962

    Rothmans962 TDPRI Member

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    I've had great success with Warmoth....This is my Warmoth Jazzmaster...Mix of Fender/Lollar/CTS/Warmoth parts.....The only thing I was slightly disapointed in was they did not have a neck with the Jazzmaster headstock shape..Hence the 70s big headstock....I did the finish on it,and all the wiring/soldering...This was my first build and went into it total blind....
    [​IMG]
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  6. KevinB

    KevinB Doctor of Teleocity

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    Well, you are quite correct in that no one is forcing a Warmoth product on anyone, but it is a very useful thing to know that their bodies are not quite to Fender spec. This means that a Callaham, Allparts, Fender, WD Music etc. pickguard almost certainly won't be a good fit, which could well be a problem. Now, of course, you could always also buy a Warmoth pickguard from them, but while they offer a decent range of styles and colours, they may not produce exactly what you want.

    And your statement that one can always buy Fender parts doesn't always hold. Fender doesn't sell bodies, and the "dismantlers" that sell on eBay won't be able to sell you a body in a finish or wood that Fender doesn't offer.

    So, yes Warmoth makes a good product but you can get at least as good quality from Musikraft or USACG and be 100% sure that it meets Fender spec.
     
  7. lineboat

    lineboat Friend of Leo's

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    First build, 20th build, that looks great!!! I like that finish, and love offsets! Nice.

    And for Warmoth, I have never had an issue with any of their parts fitting, or other components lining up.
     
  8. PJ55

    PJ55 Poster Extraordinaire

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    For Tele bodies, I think they offer a Vintage Spec body and the Warmoth Spec bodies. I haven't compared them - probably something like the flat area at the jack. I'm not too bothered either way. I've also never had any problems with parts not being compatible with their stuff. I just like their quality, fit and finish. Neither of the necks I ordered had high frets or needed much tweaking to the nut. So, apparently they spend some extra time on their products before shipping them out. And, that's something I appreciate.
     
  9. Informal

    Informal Tele-Holic

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    Good grief, 100%??

    I've fender parts that didn't fit on fender bodies.

    Surely you jest?
     
  10. Brudr

    Brudr Tele-Meister

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    I've had many Warmoth necks and have been very pleased with all of them. The only issues have been with the most recent where the TUSQ nuts were both cut too high and had to be re-worked. The fretwork and finish were excellent.
     
  11. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Warmoth claims to offer the Jazzmaster profile headstock:

    http://www.warmoth.com/Showcase/ShowcaseNeck.aspx?i=VS1014&Body=1&Path=Neck

    But I would suggest their old chart (overlaying the small S headstock, Jazzmaster headstock, and large S headstock) was a little bit wrong.
     
  12. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Where are you going with this?

    If you buy aftermarket parts (USACG, Musikraft, Warmoth necks) and you buy them unfinished you control the way the parts are custom fitted to one another before the topcoat goes on. 99% of the reason some Fender parts don't fit well to other Fender parts is, the employees over or undersanded things, sanded neck A and body B to marry together and the employee down the way or in the same station a year later had a different approach. And thus neck C doesn't fit well on body K. If I get to the parts before anyone else does, I can make things fit just the way I want them.

    Sometimes you can just take things from anywhere, throw them together and the music keeps going. Sometimes you have to go back and measure things, try and decide which piece is out of specifications. I think the joy of USACG is in the knowing no one is more intensely focused on keeping reference points right and keeping specifications just so than they are.
     
  13. Informal

    Informal Tele-Holic

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    My only point is that 100% is a pretty lofty expectation when dealing with these tolerances, no matter who the builder.
     
  14. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have a Warmoth neck that I put on a Strat and it worked out great.

    I second the recommendation of taking a cheap Squier or something and practicing your craft on it. Barring any weird problems, for the most part building a guitar from parts only requires you to just put it together. Tinker Toys for Grown-Ups, I would say. You have to be careful and make sure you order the right stuff. For example, Fender spacing on pickups, not Gibson, etc. Tuners that have the correct diameter shafts for the holes in the headstock that you specified. As long as you do that it's a piece of cake.

    The hard part actually comes in the set-up. Getting the neck angle right, getting the truss rod correct, intonation, action, etc., etc. Wiring pickups is pretty easy if you can follow a diagram and be neat and careful with a soldering iron, although there are a zillion variations from stock wiring that can be considered.

    But other than correct ordering of components, you will learn the "harder stuff" by just learning how to do a set-up and wiring job on any used guitar. As long as you are patient, read instructions/watch videos until you have a sense of what you are doing, and are not ham-fisted with tools, you should be fine. This isn't rocket science. There are some harder things to do, like cutting a nut, leveling frets, and fret jobs-- but you can always have others take care of those jobs. You can still save yourself a lot of $$ and have lots of hobbyist fun doing it if you know how to do everything else.
     
  15. KevinB

    KevinB Doctor of Teleocity

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    Good grief, I think I'll stick with my statement.

    My understanding is that both USACG and Musikraft make bodies and necks that are 100% to Fender spec.

    Does that mean they will always fit perfectly together? Of course not. Wood is wood and it shrinks and swells, and of course there are tolerances involved. All the Musikraft necks and bodies I've bought have been a simple fit - with maybe a minimal amount of sanding - to get a perfect result. They have all fit Fender (USA and MIM) necks and bodies, and other manufacturers who also build to Fender spec.
     
  16. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I've thought about this.

    I think parts can be 100% within specifications and still they won't automatically pop together every time. Wood is about as imperfect a composite material as we could imagine in some ways. We can't expect the bodies to come out any better than they do, and we are resigned to the fact we are expected to fit things every time we assemble something.

    I guess I am saying a part can be 100% and the human being still has his job to do. Semantics; whatever you wanna call it. :)
     
  17. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Look, if a guy is creating something that's in no way out of the Fender catalog, with a wildly figured top and a Hipshot bridge or a Gibson style bridge, something that's barely T style and not "fendery" at all, I would still have difficulty with Warmoth bodies. The one they sent me was crummy. I see Warmoth Gallery bodies where someone has written "UGLY" in the recess of the rout. All of this is still fine with me if people want an inferior body or some odd shape, and they know what they're getting into, let them at it.

    My issue is really that Warmoth could point this out to the excited would be buyer because in small images, a lot of men just cannot distinguish the fine differences and they get blindsided and have to make up rationalizations. I get all kinds of communications from people about how they weren't paying attention and they feel like it was their fault and it is too late to cancel the transaction. It is a TRAP. That's what it is and I feel an obligation every time I endorse someone buying a Warmoth neck to make sure they know the Warmoth body will start to look funny the longer they look at it once it is finished.

    Let's suppose you have spent $ 1,000 on Warmoth parts and so you figure you're a loyal Warmoth customer and that's fine. But I have spend almost $ 4,000 with them, best I can tell. It really baffles me how you can say "I have it in for Warmoth" when all I am doing is campaigning to get them to standardize and improve their body designs so I don't have to commiserate with these disappointed guys whose projects are not right after all the money they spent. Oh, and did I mention that the body was not one of the last things I bought; it was closer to the beginning with them? I did not "quit" them over this body, not by a mile.

    I don't want to be told "Oh, you were right, Bubba". I have run out of things I can say.

    +

    What I think is telling is, I preach any time I can that the neck pockets on the Allparts bodies I've got tend to be fine out a ways but are too narrow at the heel end to accommodate the full width of any of the heels of the necks in the marketplace. Nobody ever jumps on me for being anti-Allparts. If you were in my place, what would you take from that? :)
     
  18. chipbutty24

    chipbutty24 Friend of Leo's

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    Maybe you have particularly bad luck. Not sure how you get to the point of spending $4k with a supplier that isn't giving you a good product.

    No question I haven't nearly the expertise and experience you have but I do have some and I can only speak from that point of view.

    I've "built" 3 guitars from Warmoth bodies and necks and they have all literally gone together without a hitch. I've also had stuff from other well regarded suppliers that hasn't gone together nearly as well. I'm talking extra routing, sanding, etc.

    If you don't like Warmoth, that's fine by me. You certainly have a wealth of good info and your posts have helped me in the past but your crusade against W left a bit of a bad taste in my mouth, sorry. It's not like they are misrepresenting their product as as far as I can see. They have quite a number of fit disclaimers on their site.

    IMO a complete novice could go on their site and order up some parts and have a better shot of throwing together a good if not great guitar than with pretty much any other supplier. In fact that's exactly what I did on my first build. YMMV.
     
  19. PJ55

    PJ55 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've only ordered Corian nuts on my Warmoth necks. And, they cut them great. I'm not a big fan of Tusq nuts. The acoustic saddles I do like. They also require a lot of handwork, but they are otherwise terrific.
     
  20. KevinB

    KevinB Doctor of Teleocity

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    I think you are absolutely correct, and I have certainly heard very few, if any, complaints regarding the quality of materials, or the fretwork they provide. A big plus for them is that they also sell all sorts of hardware and pickguards, so they really are the closest thing to a one-stop shop for a quality custom guitar.

    I think it just bugs a few of us that their neck heel transitions and Tele body shapes are almost-but-not-quite Fender like, and they don't tell you that up front. If that's not an issue for you, then by all means buy from Warmoth and you'll most probably put together a great instrument.
     
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