Warmoth, a little disappointed

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by craichead, Jul 8, 2013.

  1. craichead

    craichead TDPRI Member

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    I agree. I also wanted to add that other than this issue the neck and body are 5 star. Light and tight just how I like it. I got the boatneck as well so bridge pickup fattens up nice. I'm using a set of Don Mare Supersports. Really happy with those as well.
     
  2. Mark Adkins

    Mark Adkins Tele-Meister

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    Can you post a pic of the neck and body joint?
     
  3. montanatanner

    montanatanner Tele-Meister

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    I have the same problem with my Warmoth tele build--neck sits way too high in the pocket, resulting in the saddles sitting high. Shimming the neck helps somewhat, but then the saddles are so high that there's barely any output from the bridge pickup which is as close to the strings as it can get. The guitar resonates amazingly, has great tone (when it's not shimmed) and is very lightweight, but it's largely unplayable. I handed it over to a local luthier a while ago who can probably route the pocket the way it should have been originally (I'm no routing master and am over spending time on it). With his schedule I might see it in another couple months. Can't say I miss it since I couldn't do much with it anyway. After that experience my build days are over--maybe I'll give it another shot someday when I have nothing better to do (like work, raise kids, actually play guitar, etc).
     
  4. TeleHobby

    TeleHobby TDPRI Member

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    In thinking through the issue of a neck setting apparently too high in the pocket, it would seem that either the pocket is not routed to the proper depth, there is paint buildup (which would be obvious), or the heel of the neck is too thick. Either situation, or a combination of them, would contribute to the problems being discussed. I also remember seeing in a separate post some time ago, that the neck screws may not draw down properly due to build up at the screw hole openings or the the thru body holes not having proper clearance creating a binding situation. I will pay more attention to the dimensions of any necks and body parts I choose to use in the future to insure the components meet the specifications prior to finishing and assembly.
     
  5. craichead

    craichead TDPRI Member

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    No finish in the pocket as I masked it off before spraying.

    Don't know exactly what the issue is without taking it apart and getting some exact measurements. FWIW at the same time I ordered another finished body and put a Mexican neck on it. Fits perfectly with no issues. The one in question is a total vintage pine body and total vintage neck.

    The guitar is playable and I may just leave it the way it is.
     
  6. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Well, are the neck pockets on these 5/8" deep or something different ?
    I can't see the Warmoth CNC machines doing anything different.

    So then we talk neck. Are we talking about tight radius with jumbo frets and someone who likes high action above the frets ?

    I have used nickels under the saddles on Teles to make a decent setup on such guitars where the owner had limited funds or was not willing to pay for and/or risk finish for post finish routing, etc. With great results I'd add.

    I actually have a jar of buffalo nickles for the task. I find old coins effect sustain better FWIW. I once used dimes cut in half on a Strat Trem that someone had cut the screws too short for a guy. We later got normal screws to set it up proper but it was fine until he got back for the new screws when they came in, FWIW.

    There are also bigger diameter saddles that others. The steel threaded for example are small diameter. I had some Ti ones made 5/16 rod that fixed one Tele with super high action for example. Where there is a will, there is a way. Almost always. ;)
     
  7. Mongo Park

    Mongo Park Tele-Holic

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    If you don't want to shim, I hear Ya!
    It is a project so adjust th neck or pocket so it is good to go, part of the build.
    On the other side precision kits are THE best around for the money, perfect fit, no dinking around with shims, problems are well taken care of, very well liked on the Les Paul forum. Something to consider anyways.

    Cheers Ron
     
  8. sjruvolo

    sjruvolo Tele-Meister

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    +1 This is correct with regards to shimming and saddle heights.
     
  9. nogin007

    nogin007 Tele-Meister

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    I must just be lucky. I bought 2 Warmoth necks, and 2 Warmoth bodies. Wound up with 2 complete T style guitars, both with low action. One has a Gotoh modern bridge, and the other with vintage style 3 barrel bridge. No shims. Everything bolted together as they were supposed to. I don't remember ever having a guitar with a shim in it.
     
  10. getbent

    getbent Telefied Ad Free Member

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    hmmm, first, I hear the frustration and I don't want to not value that appropriately...

    but, there is something that ALL of us should entertain... I've assemble several guitars now and from all pedigrees of fit and finish, all origins and made by a variety of companies (including warmoth)....

    The difference for many of us is that we have only done a few guitars, we aren't luthiers, heck, many of us are not even journeyman woodworkers and even more aren't really all that great with the fine motor skills of someone adept at working with materials.

    No harm in any of that and the DIY spirit does one thing if it does anything, it calls us to respect and admire the artisans who do it every day and who are able to command a price for their work. (at least that is what I have learned.)

    It takes me probably 10 hours to accomplish what a good luthier could do in 1. In many cases, regardless of time frame, I would not accomplish the level of work that they could.....

    Warmoth sells lots of pieces to all manner of hobbyist and professional... One thing I noted when I bought from them is that they set an expectation with the customer that they understand the work.

    Most of the guys I really admire tell me all the time about how much work they still do even when they get a 'finished' body or neck....

    Sometimes, I have just put neck to body and it is a match made in heaven (kinda) but more often, I have to do a bunch of work to get it all to work...

    In this instance, you have several other alternatives to shimming, but they will require you to do some work with the wood and the components and we all know that can be scary.

    If you have a friend or someone you trust to help you, you can slow down the process and determine a plan to achieve your goals and then do the work.

    If it was just assembly everyone would have great success with these projects. I can't tell you how many necks and bodies I've gotten from failed projects that just needed some love and time and proper attention....

    Of the vendors who sell necks and bodies... I think Warmoth does the most warning that it is what it is... they are high quality parts, but they aren't simply bolt on.
     
  11. TeleRichie

    TeleRichie Tele-Meister

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    My experience was fine w/ Warmouth. First assembly was perfect. Swamp ash body, fatback maple neck, Fender bridge plate and the StewMac saddles that Boris recommended. Fit together perfectly first time, no shim, and easy intonation. Playable in minutes and solid.

    Got another body and neck from them will assemble it soon.
     
  12. TeleHobby

    TeleHobby TDPRI Member

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    My Warmoth build is very close to being right. I just need a tad more height on the Joe Barden saddle for the low E and A string to eliminate light fret buzzing on those strings. Not a gross situation at all. I've got 2mm longer saddle adjustment screws ordered that I think will do the trick. The bottom of the "E" end of the saddle being milled off is causing me to run out of thread with the standard 10mm long saddle adjustment screws.

    I have another Warmoth body already and am planning another build for the very near future. What fun!
     
  13. flyingbanana

    flyingbanana Poster Extraordinaire

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    As another person commented...post a couple of pics of the neck and neck pocket.
     
  14. ezas

    ezas TDPRI Member

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    What helped me. . .

    Take the neck off and look at the heel. Is the wood pulled up from the screw holes? If so knock them back level and slightly counter-sink the screw.

    This probably goes without saying but makes sure the front of the neck pocket is clean/clean. The guitar I was working on had a bit of sawdust in the corners. I shaped a hobby sander to match the round corners of the pocket, and 'dressed' the front of the pocket to remove even the slight wood texture in the front of the pocket, and make the pocket as deep as the slight indentations from the routing in the corners. These two things eliminated the need for a shim on that guitar. YMMV

    And put me down in the 'if you need a shim, you need a shim' camp. There are so many places on a guitar the transmit vibration to a guitar that a little bit of card stock in one third of the pocket is not going to make any difference
     
  15. Walter Broes

    Walter Broes Tele-Afflicted

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    I think having this problem with a neck and body from the same company is weird, and pretty bad.

    What's even stranger is the advice to shim, because that would only make your problem worse. Unless the person you talked to was talking about a shim on the other side of the pocket than where they usually go, to get negative neck angle - and I think that's odd too, because it's not a very common way to set up a Fender style guitar.
     
  16. dbickford

    dbickford Tele-Afflicted

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    View attachment 188825

    This one has a shim. 2 thicknesses of business card at the rear of the pocket. I can't see it. The body is a 1 piece white spruce. I run Ernie Ball extra Slinkies 8-38, tuned down a full step. DGCFAD. When I pluck the low E , the body resonates enough to tickle my l'il beer belly. ( :
     
  17. dbickford

    dbickford Tele-Afflicted

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    image-3018869580.jpg
     
  18. ezas

    ezas TDPRI Member

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    If I recall correctly, in one of the Erlewine books he has a bit from a guitar maker about negative neck angle and why he thinks it is a good thing. I think it was in the How to Setup your Guitar to Play Great book, but I misplaced that book (the polite term for I lost it). It made sense to me at the time when I read it.
     
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