Warmoth, a little disappointed

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by craichead, Jul 8, 2013.

  1. craichead

    craichead TDPRI Member

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    I just finished my first two builds a couple of weeks ago - one a mod on a Mexican Tele and the second a pine tele from start to finish. I got neck, bodies, etc from Warmoth with the thought that a Warmoth body and Warmoth neck should fit together well with the least amount of trouble.

    But when I finished my start to finish tele the saddles had to be adjusted insanely high - like tilted back at 45deg high. Looking down the neck I could see there was no relief, so I figured I could just loosen the truss rod, give it some relief and lower the saddles.

    So I called Warmoth to confirm this would fix my problem, and I was a little surprised at the response. The guy on the phone basically said truss rod adjustment wouldn't fix it and that the neck should be shimmed. I also gathered from talking to him and searching the forum that this is a fairly common problem with Warmoth. To say the least after spending nearly $500 on a body and neck, to basically be told that they often don't fit together perfectly - even when both are Warmoth parts is pretty lame.

    I understand that some folks don't see shimming as an issue, but that's a lot of money to spend for parts that don't fit together all that well.

    To be fair, other than that the parts are of high quality and in the future if I do another build I will still consider buying from them. However, in the future I'll also fit the neck and body together, take some measurements and if they're not to my satisfaction, I'll send them back. That is if they'll let me.

    Warmoth makes high quality replacement parts and I liked ordering from them, but this issue with necks and bodies is pretty disappointing.
     
  2. allen082

    allen082 Friend of Leo's

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    Many fenders are shimmed. Not really a big deal. Its an easy fix that I don't think anyone would notice if they weren't told it was there.

    But its your guitar so if it bugs you, that's all that matters. Keep us posted.
     
  3. dbickford

    dbickford Tele-Afflicted

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    Shims are a common adjustment. A strip or two of business card at the bridge end of the neck pocket will get your saddles down to a reasonable height. Don't dwell on that shim. Out of sight, out of mind. ( ;
     
  4. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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  5. TRexF16

    TRexF16 Friend of Leo's Vendor Member

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    Perhaps I am not understanding or visualizing correctly, but I think shimming the neck at the bridge end of the pocket (which I interpret as the part of the pocket closest to the bridge) will require the saddles to be raised even higher to get the strings the right distance off the frets. Won't this make the neck tilt towards the back of the guitar (more "Gibson-like") and require a taller bridge.

    In this case, if a shim is pursued as the answer, doesn't it need to be at the headstock end of the pocket?

    Scratching my head,
    Rex
     
  6. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    No, you want the neck to tilt up, getting the end of the neck closer to the strings, which would allow the saddles to come down some... It would depend on the angle at which you shim.... A 30 degree angle...yeah the saddles need to go higher.... a 1.5 degree angle... they probably can go lower.
     
  7. flyingbanana

    flyingbanana Poster Extraordinaire

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    That is unacceptable. I'd send it back on their dime and just order from usacg. Never once have I had an issue with them.
     
  8. Mark Adkins

    Mark Adkins Tele-Meister

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    I was thinking the same thing. But, I guess it depends on the neck. If it is not straight, with the first few frets from the nut closer to the strings than the higher frets closer to the heal, then the shim should angle the neck to give a more consistent string height along the entire neck. If the neck is straight already, I'd shim the bridge instead of the neck. Also, if the body is not yet finished and the neck needs to be lowered a little, if you have a router and are comfortable with it, just lower the neck pocket 1/16".
     
  9. twick

    twick Tele-Meister

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    uhhhh.... what? shimming the neck will require the saddle height to UP. put a little relief in the neck and check to make sure the neck pocket depth, and neck thickness are to spec. usually you shimm a neck when the saddles are to low. shimming the neck end of the heel would be bizarre. IMHO
     
  10. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Shimming a neck or deepening a neck pocket is no big deal to me either, but then again I make my own parts from blank stock and have nowhere near that kind of money invested. I put that much into tools............once and they have paid for themselves long ago ;)
     
  11. hemingway

    hemingway Poster Extraordinaire

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    If you want to lower the saddles you shim at the headstock end of the neck pocket, so you can "raise" the headstock, allowing you to lower the saddles.

    If you find your saddles are flat to the bridge, you shim at the bridge end of the neck pocket, allowing you to raise the saddles.
     
  12. Mark Adkins

    Mark Adkins Tele-Meister

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    I would also like to add that I also use purchased Warmoth necks for my first three builds (still in progress). It looks like they make their necks taller to go over pick guards, as the fretboard extends beyond the neck pocket. For my builds, I am not using a pick guard, so I rout the neck pockets to 3/4" instead of 5/8". At 3/4", it leaves a tiny gap under the fretboard to allow for finish and clear coat. If I was using a pick guard, I would leave the neck pocket at 5/8" and shim the bridge.
     
  13. motor_city_tele

    motor_city_tele Tele-Afflicted

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    For me, the business card hanging out of the pocket gives it away. Can't seem to find my x-acto knife anywhere. probably in the shed next to my set of hex keys.
     
  14. allen082

    allen082 Friend of Leo's

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    look for mine while you're in there. Haven't seen it in several months. Thanks.
     
  15. Jake D

    Jake D Tele-Holic

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    I have never owned a guitar with a neck shim that I know of. I would be alarmed if I ever had to adjust the saddles that high.
     
  16. TeleHobby

    TeleHobby TDPRI Member

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    I'm experiencing somewhat the same situation with my build using a Warmoth neck and body combination. I've chosen a Joe Barden bridge with compensated 3-saddle configuration. Because the bottom sides of the high and low "E" ends of the saddles are milled off, I can't get the saddle height high enough with the 10mm bridge adjustment screws supplied. There's no bottom half to the outer 2 saddles, so no material for the threads of the screws. As a solution, I'm going to try some 2mm, an possibly 4mm longer sadde adjustment screws in these positions. I need just a bit more height to get rid of some fret buzz on the low E, and A strings. I also considered shimming the nut side of the neck pocket as this would seem the only way direction to go to create more space over the lower part of the fretboard and thus be able to lower the saddles. Will do so if the longer adjustment screws I've ordered don't work out.

    In hindsight, I wished I would have checked the dimensions of the neck pocket and the butt end of the neck before assembling. The fit was snug enough that It might lift the finish to try to remove now.
     
  17. TeleHobby

    TeleHobby TDPRI Member

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    I should further comment that I am not disappointed in the Warmoth neck and body at this point in my project. It's all a learning process for me and I've very proud of my new Tele. Hopefully, with a few more tweaks it will all be settled.

    Having these experiences with my build helps me appreciate all that goes on in guitar manufacturing and the many variables that effect the finished product.
     
  18. Starrman44

    Starrman44 Tele-Afflicted

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    Just to add to the chorus of posts echoing the same thing, basically. I don't think shimming is that big of a deal.

    Fact is, one of the best sounding guitars I've played was a AV62RI that had a shim in the bridge end of the pocket.

    When it came to me, it had never really been set up and it had huge strings on it causing the neck to bow. I took some time with it, gradual adjustments of the truss rod over a few days got it straightened out.

    Initially set up without the shim and the saddles were super low. It seemed like the saddle was riding on one of the bridge screws. I put in the shim and it not only played better (because I could set the action how I liked it), but it also sounded better. Before it seemed like something was causing the string to not be able to vibrate freely.

    I sold the guitar eventually because of the smallish neck, but it sounded great.
     
  19. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Heat and clamps [especially if not a one piece] and retrain it a little worth a try as well...
     
  20. craichead

    craichead TDPRI Member

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    Well I should also say that aside from this issue I really really love the guitar. It plays and sounds just like I hoped it would when I planned it out.

    I guess my problem is always looking down at the neck pocket while I play and seeing that little shim on the front end. Just being anal I guess.
     
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