1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Warmer less jangly string

Discussion in 'Acoustic Heaven' started by DrPepper, Jul 9, 2020.

  1. DrPepper

    DrPepper Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    61
    Posts:
    4,266
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2017
    Location:
    Frying Pan
    My guitar has Elixirs on it now and they seem a bit bright to my ears, which would you use to warm up the tone a bit?
     
  2. doghouseman

    doghouseman Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    513
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2014
    Location:
    in your head man....
    strings usually warm up the more you use them. Have they been on for awhile? Also, the guitar itself is probably bright, and if you want to reduce the brightness, it might be better to change something on the guitar.
     
  3. TwangerWannabe

    TwangerWannabe Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    638
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2019
    Location:
    West Coast
    Dont change them and they will mellow over time and the jangle will go away.

    But with that said there is no magical string that will make a guitar sound a certain way. If a guitar is bright, it's going to be a bright guitar, period. Think about it...it's a sum of it's parts. The type of woods used, shape, bracing pattern, quality of materials used, bridge plate material, type of adhesive, the way the wood was treated/dried/seasoned, blah, blah, blah. The list of factors and variables is endless as far as what gives a guitar its sound, and strings are only one factor, so it's not going to change the inherent character of the guitar, or at least might not change it as much as you like.

    With that said Elixrs tend to be some of the brightest strings. Ditch those suckers and just order a few different sets and experiment. I'd recommend some DR Rare strings to start with. Also, D'Addario EJ's start off a little jangly but mellow out after a week or so, depending on how much you play. Also try some 80/20's if all you're used to is phosphor bronze strings. You just have to experiment and figure out what your ear prefers.

    I'd also stay away from a coated string (Elixr's are coated). The coating is there to prolong the string like and keep them sounding new and fresh for longer than an uncoated string, so if I wanted a warmer sounding string the last set of strings I'd be putting on my guitar would be Elixrs.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2020
    howardlo and That Cal Webway like this.
  4. Nick Fanis

    Nick Fanis Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    6,462
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2003
    Location:
    Athens-GREECE
    You are talking about the WOUND ones don't you? (All plain strings are about the same and sound about the same).
    Try phosphor bronze ones they are slightly warmer.
    Personally the brighter the strings the better , especially in an acoustic,but YMMV.
     
    That Cal Webway likes this.
  5. Jef

    Jef Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    891
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Location:
    Antwerp, Belgium
    Elixirs and phosphor bronzes tend to be very bright and "zingy". I only use them on my cheap and simple campfire acoustic, which seems to gain a bit of volume with phosphor bronzes.
    I like a bit drier tone from my 'better' acoustics and use 80/20s or Martin Retro monel strings. The Martins sounds quite bright at first, but they get better and they also last quite long.
     
  6. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    76
    Posts:
    6,143
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2018
    Location:
    Washington
    Elixers come in two compositions (PB and 80/20) and two coating thicknesses (Nanoweb and Polyweb). Which ones do you have? One of the advantages of Elixers is that the coating gives them a longer life - if you are looking for strings that age more rapidly then they might not be the best choice. OTOH some of us prefer them for their longer life - I've got a dozen acoustics and I don't want to be changing strings all the time.

    However one of the important things here is that people tend to use different terms to describe what they are hearing with strings (or lots of other things) and since strings are cheap the best thing is to keep trying them until you figure out what you like. Thats what I did.
     
    Charlie Bernstein likes this.
  7. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    76
    Posts:
    6,143
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2018
    Location:
    Washington
    I actually have a little suggestion that I always make when people ask this question. I don't think anyone follows it but I'll make it again.

    Get two sets of strings in the size you like to play - I'll assume that is lights for the new Yamie. Get the same manufacturer, uncoated in phosphor bronze and 80/20. Put one set on, play and record them. Play them until you feel the have gone dead. Record them again. Then put the others on and do it again. Compare the recordings (its pretty hard to compare a set of brand new strings with the dead ones you just took off).

    Decide which of the compositions you like the best both when brand new and over the life of the string. Now buy that same composition in a coated or long life string and do the same thing. Decide if you feel that the coating or treatment has changed the tone of that composition. Decide if you like the feel (some people don't). Play the coated string until you feel it has died - decide if the life justifies the additional expense.

    It helps a lot to listen to the sound clips "blind" - go back and forth between various ones to really decide which you like the best. Try to make all the playing parameters the same - same pick, same mic and recorder and settings. I try to do representative sounds that are easily compared - each string open, some basic chords, each string harmonics. I do a few finger slides - see if the coated strings reduce the noise.

    Only you can decide which you like the best on your guitars, this is one way to really know what YOU feel is best.
     
  8. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    76
    Posts:
    6,143
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2018
    Location:
    Washington
    Oh, and remember one more thing. You are playing a brand new guitar, it MAY change over the next few months or years. It may open up, you may hear this. If so that might influence your choice of strings and what you think you are hearing.

    And please, while you are doing string experiments don't change something else.....
     
    DrPepper likes this.
  9. tah1962

    tah1962 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,338
    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2020
    Location:
    Heart of Illinois
    A couple years ago I tried these John Pearse strings and have never looked back. Very well balanced strings and they last a long time too.

    John Pearse 550SL strings are plain steel and round wound phosphor bronze. “Slightly Light” gauge: 011, 015, 022w, 030w, 040w, 050w.

    upload_2020-7-9_11-29-10.jpeg
     
    telestratosonic likes this.
  10. 3-Chord-Genius

    3-Chord-Genius Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,878
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2015
    Location:
    Winchester, VA
    Keep playing them. They lose high end after a while and mellow out noticably.
     
  11. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    14,894
    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2003
    Location:
    northwest
    Elixers are way too warm to my ears. ... after a couple of days.
    Flat wound strings are very warm.
    But remember, all strings are just steel on the high/treble strings.... unless you go to nylon.
     
  12. TwangerWannabe

    TwangerWannabe Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    638
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2019
    Location:
    West Coast
    I know JP has a loyal following, but I thought these were some of the worst strings Iv'e ever tried. They start off very bright, but they tame down pretty fast. Probably too fast, because literally within the same day the low E turned into a dull "thud", akin to a set of strings that has been left on a guitar for way too long. Thought it was a fluke and tried another set and they did the same thing. A while ago figured I'd give them even another try...same thing again. Definitely not a fan of John Pearse strings.
     
    tah1962 likes this.
  13. 57fenderstrat

    57fenderstrat Tele-Holic

    Age:
    30
    Posts:
    801
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2019
    Location:
    Binghamton NY
    As others said they will mellow out over time, sometimes I end up leaving my elixirs on for nearly a year as long as they aren’t crusty.

    Also different picks and pick thickness can help. Playing with your thumb and fingers being the warmest
     
  14. dwh100

    dwh100 Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    181
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2016
    Location:
    LA county
    Try some monels. I like the Martin Retros on my 0-15.
     
  15. tah1962

    tah1962 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,338
    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2020
    Location:
    Heart of Illinois
    Interesting. I tried DR Rare strings and what you’re describing as your experience with the JP strings, was my exact experience with the DR Rares. I guess that’s why there are so many companies making string as everyone has there favorites, and not so favorites.
     
  16. rjtwangs

    rjtwangs Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Age:
    73
    Posts:
    1,725
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Location:
    Reston, Virginia
    I hate elixirs!! I remember when Taylor put them on everything, making ALL Taylor's sound alike??? On all of my acoustics I use D'Addario 80/20 Bronze, I use the lights, .012-.053, and they bring out the sound of the wood while adding very little of the swishyness of phosphor bronze and the even worse Elixirs....simply my opinion, ymmv, etc etc....


    RJ
     
  17. TwangerWannabe

    TwangerWannabe Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    638
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2019
    Location:
    West Coast
    DR's can sound kind of dead right out of the package. They definitely dont have that "zing' you get with most phosphor bronze strings. I just hated how the John Pearse strings sending zingy and then the low E just went absolutely dead within a few hours while the others sounded as you'd expect. I guess I didn't like them because they were inconsistently consistent.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2020
    tah1962 likes this.
  18. tah1962

    tah1962 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,338
    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2020
    Location:
    Heart of Illinois
    Very strange as I’ve been through multiple sets of JP’s and I’ve never had that issue.
     
  19. Chief101

    Chief101 Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    319
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2015
    Location:
    Not far from Nashville
    Unless I missed it, the OP never said if he was referring to electric or acoustic strings. Obviously two different discussions. I assumed he meant electric strings. Some may have assumed acoustic.

    In my experience, for electric, any string with nickel content softened the tone. If your wanting to soften the tone try nickel coated or nickel strings. DR and D’addario are my go-to’s.
     
  20. TwangerWannabe

    TwangerWannabe Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    638
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2019
    Location:
    West Coast
    It's an acoustic sub-forum.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.