Wanted: Step files for strat & Tele bodies (CNC Warning :) )

Slowtwitch

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I'm wondering if any of you have the accurate step files (3d CAD model) for a Tele and Strat body.

I use Fusion 360, and want to mess around with trying cutting a body on CNC just for kicks (as opposed to using my templates I've used to date).
Would prefer not to reinvent the wheel
 

guitarbuilder

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I'm wondering if any of you have the accurate step files (3d CAD model) for a Tele and Strat body.

I use Fusion 360, and want to mess around with trying cutting a body on CNC just for kicks (as opposed to using my templates I've used to date).
Would prefer not to reinvent the wheel
Reinventing the wheel is how you learn how to use your software...LOL. I had a modeling thread but unfortunately is it useless due to photobucket.





 

Jim_in_PA

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What you are calling "step files" (toolpath files) are machine specific. You (or someone) creates the vectors in CAD software like Fusion306 or a Vectric product and then you create the toolpaths from the various vectors, writing them out to the computer with CAM software (either integral like with Vectric or a separate program) using what's called a "post processor" which includes machine specific information that's required to actually cut the files on your machine. There really isn't any kind of "push the button" situation unless the file creator is using exactly the same software, the same CNC machine and the same exact tooling as you would be using.

Honestly, creating these files for a flat body design like a Tele-type is very basic...a tracing and cleaning up process followed by the steps your software environment requires to continue. It's a great learning experience and I really do recommend a Tele-type for a first experience. And scrap wood... ;)
 

pshupe

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What you are calling "step files" (toolpath files) are machine specific. You (or someone) creates the vectors in CAD software like Fusion306 or a Vectric product and then you create the toolpaths from the various vectors, writing them out to the computer with CAM software (either integral like with Vectric or a separate program) using what's called a "post processor" which includes machine specific information that's required to actually cut the files on your machine. There really isn't any kind of "push the button" situation unless the file creator is using exactly the same software, the same CNC machine and the same exact tooling as you would be using.

Honestly, creating these files for a flat body design like a Tele-type is very basic...a tracing and cleaning up process followed by the steps your software environment requires to continue. It's a great learning experience and I really do recommend a Tele-type for a first experience. And scrap wood... ;)

Actually *.step or *.stp is a kind of 3d model file and will be easily imported into Fusion 360. As Jim mentions it is extremely easy to create Fusion 360 files from any of the free drawings that you can get here. I modeled a thinline tele from those drawings and found it very easy to modify as needed.
Fusion-01.JPG


Cheers Peter.
 

Jim_in_PA

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Thanks for the clarification on the file type, Peter.

But I'll reinforce that a Tele-type is about the simplest guitar body there is and no 3D modeling is really required to cut it. It's 100% 2D and a great learning experience to build from scratch in the software of choice.
 

Slowtwitch

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Yes I'm aware of what stp files are. And yes I def will do my own CAM, even own extrusions and pockets. Basically need the contour outlines of the 2 bodies.

I've been learning and using CNC in a production workshop the past year for sheet goods.

I'm just after an accurate model (can even be *.dxf) of a strat and tele.

I'm planning to do the contour cuts (2d) and pockets and still do the roundovers, belly and arm cuts by hand. Might even cut the neck pocket the traditional way.
 

Slowtwitch

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Reinventing the wheel is how you learn how to use your software...LOL. I had a modeling thread but unfortunately is it useless due to photobucket.






Thx Marty. Yeah I found that website
 

Slowtwitch

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What will be new to me on CNC will be cutting deep hardwood (Ash) stock as opposed to Birch ply. I'll have to cut from both sides (top face and bottom face) using reference pins to turn the body. The bits I use can't cut 1.75" deep.

And holding down the stock, I'm still figuring this out. Thinking to doubleside tape the stock to a wasteboard

Also from Marty's thread I take note to leave some stock on the edge to clean up afterwards by sanding. Is a 1/16th enough for Ash?
 

guitarbuilder

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What will be new to me on CNC will be cutting deep hardwood (Ash) stock as opposed to Birch ply. I'll have to cut from both sides (top face and bottom face) using reference pins to turn the body. The bits I use can't cut 1.75" deep.

And holding down the stock, I'm still figuring this out. Thinking to doubleside tape the stock to a wasteboard

Also from Marty's thread I take note to leave some stock on the edge to clean up afterwards by sanding. Is a 1/16th enough for Ash?


I leave enough wood attached to keep the body attached to the waste, but also plane the body two about 1/32" thicker so I can send it through the drum sander on both sides as a final operation. If you design with tabs, you can machine deeper. I didn't find that on Meshcam until years later when my methodology was kind of set.


I use a combination of clamps and or double sided carpet or duct tape for holding, depending on what the part is. Fretboards are taped. Bodies are clamped but you don't want to run into clamps, so sometimes it is tape and clamps. I have on occasion screwed things down too but that puts holes in the spoilboard and also you don't want to accidentally machine into them. I have used brass screws at time just in case.

I use the centerline at the end of the body, neck, or fretboard, as my x and y zero points, top of material is usually z zero. Occasionally I will measure up from the tablez0 which is set at zero) the height I need and reset the zero there. That is a little more risky, but sometimes I do it.
 
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Jim_in_PA

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If your machine can handle a .375" collet, you can get a nice .375" end mill with a 1.75" LOC for full depth cutting of guitar bodies, etc. I grabbed a "Cobra" brand off of Amazon and have actually been very pleased with the tool. It gets use for non-guitar stuff a lot with thicker hardwoods. To insure a clean edge, I leave a .02mm allowance and use a last pass. and as Marty mentions, I also use tabs and manually free the body from the blank afterward.

Setting up for two-sided is still a good idea, however, as for a standard Tele-type you can do the bottom roundover using the CNC and point-roundover tooling and also do anything else you might want to do on the backside...I do rear control cavities, for example, and sometimes some belly contouring. I cut the back details first and then flip about the centerline (indexing pins) to do the front details with the cutout done last.
 




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