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Wanna Be A Lineman?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Torren61, Feb 28, 2021.

  1. Torren61

    Torren61 Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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  2. Recce

    Recce Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I am almost 65 so no not really but without college you can make a good living as a lineman.
     
  3. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    cue glen campbell
     
  4. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I was a lineman, very briefly, for about six months in 1975.
    I was a CWA Union member.
    I worked for Capitol Cable, a TV cable company.
    The guy who taught me to climb telephone poles "burned" one.
    He lost footing and slid down the pole, filling his, uh, nether regions with splinters.
    I managed to avoid that problem.
    I did get a face full of yellowjacket stings while 30 feet up a pole.
    Charming.
    Anyways, I survived it.
    It was a great job, otherwise.
    It paid about $8.50 an hour when the minimum wage was about $2.15 an hour.
    I sing and play Wichita Lineman.
    Romantic tune.
    Being a lineman is anything but romantic.
     
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  5. Brad Pittiful

    Brad Pittiful Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    is it for the county?...i will not be a linemen for the state...thats just wrong
     
  6. TheDavis

    TheDavis Tele-Meister

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    I’ve worked enough construction to know better. You touch it, you die.
     
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  7. McGlamRock

    McGlamRock Poster Extraordinaire

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    Too tough a job for my soft hands.
    When I was taking a notary class, the teacher went off on a tangent talking about linemen. I forget why.
    He said in really cold, more rural areas, they would send helicopters to fly above the lines, and the air from the rotors moved would push ice off the lines. I raised an eyebrow and have always thought he was full of it. To his credit, he otherwise did a great job teaching about becoming notary public.
     
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  8. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Huh, I thought I had to have a Bass VI to be a lineman for the county.
     
  9. suave eddie

    suave eddie Friend of Leo's

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    I was a phone company tech for 30 years. I never liked climbing poles. At least I only dealt with low voltage wiring (for the most part).
     
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  10. Torren61

    Torren61 Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    Uh... that's not really a lineman. No offense intended. :D
     
  11. Torren61

    Torren61 Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    Being an electrical lineman and also being a gear addict who wants to be good at playing guitar has spiraled into a sort of Catch-22. When i wasn't working so much and working in a state with a lower lineman wage, I had plenty of time to play but no money for gear. Now, I have a ton of money for gear but not as much time to play. Often, when i post here, I'm posting from my phone or from my iPad from work while waiting to work.

    If you know any younger people, women included, who may be interested in the electrical line trade, have them check out the link. The money is obscene but the work is rough which is why the money is obscene.
     
  12. 39martind18

    39martind18 Friend of Leo's

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    I think I'd rather be running back.:confused::rolleyes::D:D
     
  13. 985plowboy

    985plowboy Friend of Leo's

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    No, no I do not.
    My Dad started as a lineman for LP&L, Louisiana Power and Light. They were eventually bought out by Entergy from whom I currently purchase electricity.

    When I was a kid, every time the weather got bad at night I’d lay awake in bed waiting inevitably for the phone to ring calling Dad out to work the Emergency situation.
    Tornadoes, hurricanes, sleet, ice, anything the on shift line crews couldn’t handle solo the off shift men were called back on to help.

    I’m 52, my Dad passed away years ago, and I still don’t sleep well during bad weather.
     
  14. Torren61

    Torren61 Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    My first day in the electrical line trade was July 15th, 1982. I was making $6.10 an hour in Memphis, TN. Two years later, I got into the apprenticeship and my first apprenticeship job was in St.Cloud, FL. I was making $6.99 an hour and I was living in a six man tent.

    The apprenticeship program required a lot of traveling just as it does today. It was miserable and glorious at the same time. I met so many weird and wacky people and I had a great time and acquired a LOT of stories along the way.

    I paid my dues, literally and figuratively. I've been a member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) for nearly forty years. I have worked in most of the US. I have seen so much of this country. I have made millions of dollars in this trade since I started. I'm on my fourth wife and missed a lot of ballgames and other activities because of having to work out of town when my kids were playing.

    However, if a person had a plan and was willing to travel long enough to finish their apprenticeship and then apply for a job with an electrical utility, they could end up with a GREAT job with high pay and not have to travel again.

    My sons both have jobs that they love and they're not interested in becoming linemen but if they did, I would tell them to buy a fifth wheel RV and a truck to pull it and hit the road until they don't have to.
     
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  15. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's

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    Thanks. Someone needed to say it. :lol:
     
  16. suave eddie

    suave eddie Friend of Leo's

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  17. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Agreed.
    It was quite an adventure for me, but it's like Miniature Lineman, or Drugstore Lineman.
    As close as I'll ever get!;):):lol:
     
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  18. aadvark

    aadvark Tele-Meister

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    is it in Wichita? :)
     
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  19. stxrus

    stxrus Poster Extraordinaire

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    The linesmen (women) that come here after a major storm event are some of the nicest people you’ll ever want to meet. They are here doing the very hard job of getting power back on. The people here are very appreciative and show it. Replacing thousands of poles, stringing miles and miles of cable, replacing transformers in what is usually oppressive post storm heat is not an easy task. Folks have made sandwiches, full meals, you name for the crews working their neighborhoods.
    Much respect for the emergency line crews
     
  20. telestratosonic

    telestratosonic Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I'm a retired Boilermaker and a member of the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers (IBB), headquartered in Kansas City, Missouri. Like the IBEW, the Boilermakers Union is a trade union in the US AND Canada.

    While always on the road like you, I made a good living and retired in 2015 at 65. Other than the obvious hazards of working with electricity and working at heights, I've always viewed being a lineman as being healthier than crawling around inside towers at oil refineries or inside boilers and precipitators at coal-fired power plants. I've always loved outside work.

    Were a young guy today, I would definitely look at becoming a lineman. It's a good paying job with benefits (drugs, dental, eye care, etc.). Other health care (surgery, cancer treatments, access to doctors/specialists, etc.) is paid for by our taxes and is available to all in Canada. Plus, there's a pension waiting at the end so that one can live with dignity.

    It doesn't rain very often here on the prairies so that's a plus. Cold? Yes, but one gets used to it and it's only for a few months in winter. Summers are nice. Think North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, and Minnesota weather-wise.

    I doubt that linemen will be automated anytime soon. Yes, one has to be able to climb poles but most work out here is done from a basket-on-a-boom (elevated work platform) nowadays. After damage and outages caused by major storms, there's plenty of opportunity to make overtime money to buy those guitars one has been lusting for, lol.

    Seriously though, it's physically demanding and can be dangerous so one has to be aware of the dangers and to always work safely.

    My mother's younger brother, Uncle Bill, was a lineman and an IBEW member back in Newfoundland. He lived with us from the late 1950s until 1960 in Gander. We used to get wicked winter storms with snow up to the eaves sometimes.

    My Uncle Bill drove a one ton dually service truck home every day after work.We moved into the newly-built town in 1957. Until then, we had lived in a converted WWII army barracks. For the first year or so, we had the only telephone for blocks around because of Uncle Bill being a lineman. During those winter storms, the power almost always went out. If it happened at night when Uncle Bill was at home, the telephone would ring right away. That was his cue to roll out of bed, get dressed for the winter weather and warm up the truck. Sometimes, depending on the wind and snow drifts, it was fairly easy going for him but at other times it was brutal. When he left, we wouldn't see him again until the electricity was restored to all homes. Poles were climbed the hard way - no baskets. When he returned home, sometimes after being gone for days, he might be exhausted but he was always upbeat and had a positive outlook on life. Hmmm, maybe making a decent living had something to do with that.

    He retired at 65 and lived with dignity in his own home until he died a year or so ago at 80.
     
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