Walnut Parlor Guitar -Slight Return

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by guitarbuilder, Sep 5, 2019.

  1. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Fall means it's time to put an acoustic guitar together. Two years ago I did a walnut parlor and really like it. Last year I did a maple parlor and didn't care for it so much. I have about 10 walnut back and side sets and another 10 rosewood sets. A lifetime supply at this rate.

    This guitar uses the same pattern as #1. Kind of Martin-ish. Originally I made all my acoustic patterns out of posterboard, but the last few have been plywood. I cut one out of what looks like underlayment.

    Here's the drawing I used with the X carve.

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    After cutting it out:

    pattern1.jpg


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  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I had decided to make a new universal workboard that was smaller. My original was patterned after the 1980 model at the Charles Fox GRD school. As it turns out that was better for a dreadnaught size guitar or 000, of which I made about 3-4 of each since. That workboard made this parlor business a bit more difficult because the slots didn't always end up in the right spot for a smaller guitar.

    I drew up a drawing and the X carve cut it out. It's not like you press a button and it pops out. You have to convert the drawing to a toolpath first and edit it so you end up with what you want. Many times you end up with what you don't want and you have to fix it. :)


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    I flipped it over and cut a dado and groove for the support pieces. Those slots are to hold vertical dowels with 1/4" bolts in them that are held in place with a wingnut and washer.

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  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Now it's time for a kit of parts. Stewmac will sell you one for 4-600 dollars but they don't have a parlor one, just a D or 000 style. A guitar will need a fretboard, a back plate,top plate, bent sides, a neck and end block, spruce braces, mahogany braces, lining or tantelons, a bridge and bridge plate, and binding. I have a quite few sets of B grade spruce. It's cheap and has imperfections. It works fine for me. The woodworking is just jointing the mating edges and then sanding it down. You could plane it down too. I prefer the thickness sander. With that done, the X carve cut it out as well as a rosette channel. Again...it sounds easy but you aren't seeing the top that got ruined when the rosette was cut in the wrong spot because the X carve did exactly what I told it to do....drill it in the wrong spot. Before CNC, I used a router and trammel set up to make my rosette channels. That works too.


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    Last edited: Sep 5, 2019
  4. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The rosette was made on the X carve with some scraps of mahogany that I had sitting here. I drew a circle and cut it up into segments. Then I created a toolpath for 4 of those segments and cut them out. I did this 3 times to make 12 pieces. Because the X carve was not perfectly calibrated, I had to fit them by sanding the edge a little.


    segments.jpg
     
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  5. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I picked the best 10 and epoxied them in. The wax paper keeps the clamping caul from sticking to it. segments2.jpg
     
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  6. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    After the epoxy is cured, I thickness sanded the top down and cut the top out of the waste.

    segments3.jpg

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    segments 5.jpg
     
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  7. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    A similar process for the back. Joint the two pieces and thickness sand it down. Then cut it out. The top and back are cut out with about 1/4" extra material on the edges all the way around.


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  8. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Sides involve thinning them and jointing them on the edges. I cut off a couple narrow strips to be used as walnut binding. Sides get sanded to about .085 thick for easy bending on the fox bender. My sander is a Delta 31-250. It is one of the worst machines I ever owned. The belt tracking is kind of hard to get exact. The clamping mechanism is difficult to deal with when installing a sanding strip, and parts are now unavailable. It's no wonder they discontinued it and came up with a new and improved model. I could go on about the deficiencies but that's enough.
     
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  9. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    After sanding the walnut side with two binding strips adjacent to the edge get put into the Fox bender. I spray it with water on both sides before inserting it into the slats.
    The bender is preheated for 10 minutes until water sizzles and evaporates off the top of the spring steel slat. First the screw and shoe gets cranked down into place to set the waist. then the lower and upper bouts are bent and held into place. 10 minutes to cook. 20 minutes to cool at least before removal.


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    Last edited: Sep 5, 2019
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  10. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    This fox bender is heated by 3 higher wattage bulbs. The walnut bends nicely.

    fox4.jpg

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  11. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The second side and binding were just done yesterday and look remarkably like the first side.

    I trimmed them down and they are residing in the assembly board.

    sides in board.jpg
     
  12. GunsOfBrixton

    GunsOfBrixton Tele-Afflicted

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    I love these builds. I would ask you to make one for me while you've got all parts out but the idea that I need another guitar sitting around while I am trying to reduce the count seems a bit counterproductive. :)
     
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  13. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The fretboard is quartersawn walnut. I resawed a slice off of a thicker plank I had here. It got a 12" radius on the Xcarve and a 1/2" D round nose bit.

    Slotting took place on my stewmac slotting system at 25.562" and the holes were drilled at the drill press. Dots were punched out of .090 pickguard material scrap and duco'd in.

    The sides were cut off on the bandsaw and sanded to the line to create the taper. The excess at the ends were cut off with a small hand razor saw.





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  14. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I can make up some parts for you if you like...you can't have too many unfinished guitars around.
     
  15. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The scrap from the back is large enough to make a peghead overlay.


    I jointed the edges again and clamped them together. After 30 minutes I scraped off the glue squeeze out. The next day I ran both sides through the sander to level it all out.

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  16. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Marty the smells and sweat you're bringing back is heady stuff,well done :D
     
  17. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The lining was made on the x carve with a 1/16 bit. This was the first time I tried this and it worked out pretty nicely.

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  18. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The burning walnut and sweat from wondering if it cracked?? LOL
     
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  19. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Braces are cut on the bandsaw off a bracewood billet and thickness sanded to thickness. I think I'll do a single X brace configuration on this guitar.

    brace1.jpg

    brace2.jpg
     
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  20. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The pyramid bridge was x carved off a hunk of walnut. I have used this particular program on all the pyramid bridges I've made and it works out nicely. This is the beauty of CNC because I didn't have to do much more than stick the wood down and press the make a bridge button. Double sided duct tape holds it down to the table.

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