Wall of empty cabs, mic'd combo?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by JimmyJam, Aug 2, 2009.

  1. denny

    denny Tele-Holic

    Age:
    62
    Posts:
    839
    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2004
    Location:
    North of Dallas, TX
    And Geddy Lee's backline is front-loading clothes dryers (ee Rush in Rio DVD) with tumbling clothes visible through the glass doors.
     
  2. axsys

    axsys TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    42
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Location:
    Louisville
    It was Chicken Rotisseries on the Snakes and Arrows tour last summer. His FOH sound is from a tech21 DI I believe.



     
  3. tbradshaw

    tbradshaw Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    343
    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2004
    Location:
    Atlanta
    At last year's Van Halen show the PA shut off during Ed's solo. From my seat about halfway back on the side you could just barely hear a guitar coming from the stage. I can't imagine that that volume was even close to a full 100 watt into a 4x12 cab onstage. I'm assuming they used in-ear monitors and what I heard was either some piped in stage volume or a mic'd cab behind the wall of EVH's.

    FWIW, Ed looked a little irritated but handled the mishap like a pro and picked up right where he left off. I thought for sure he'd lose it and we'd be reading the next day about the blowout that ended the tour.
     
  4. FMA

    FMA Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,362
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2003
    Not just rockers. What about Brad Paisley and his wall of Dr. Zs?
     
  5. Wrong-Note Rod

    Wrong-Note Rod Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,224
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2009
    Location:
    atlanta
    Billy G from ZZ Top uses a big rack on tour with a marshall JMP pre-amp, a bunch of EQs (one for each guitar) and a marshall tube rack amp, which drives ONE of the cabinets behind him. They have a funny little onstage decoration, a bunch of Expandora distortion boxes mounted onto some kinda little tree with an african dog head scuplture on top of it... thats fake, it doesnt work, its not doing anything. Theres always a mic in front of one of the guitar cabs, but thats fake and not turned on. His signal from the JMP goes right to the mixer. Theres also an effects rack piece in there, but I cant remember what it is. I didnt see this years tour up close, I did see last years. Stage left, standing next to Sammy (Billy's tech - Elwood was out with another band). Sammy showed me the rack, all the guitars, the whole nine yards.
     
  6. bowlfreshener

    bowlfreshener Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,119
    Joined:
    May 3, 2007
    Location:
    Virginia, USA
    In college George Clinton and the P-Funk All Star's played a concert, and I was on the crew. On each side of the stage were 6-8 rows of 2 Marshall 4x12 cabients stacked on each other, then each stack of cabinets had 2 heads on top of them. At the end of the show, I was helping to take down this "wall of amps" backline, and only 3 out of the possible 12-16 Marshall stacks were actually plugged in, and all the other cabs and heads had "spare" or "Backup" written on a piece of gaffers tape on the back of each. The wall of amps is more for "show" these days since they tend to mic the amps through the PA in the larger venues anyways...
     
  7. tomkatf

    tomkatf Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,029
    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2004
    Location:
    San Diego
    Neil Young's main stage amp in the late 80's-early 90's was a ragged Tweed Deluxe inside one of these 10ft. Fender mockups... Had a wall of Conn Strobe tuners though!

    Best,
    Tom
     

    Attached Files:

  8. jonzer

    jonzer Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    53
    Posts:
    3,173
    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2005
    Location:
    Virginia
    On the tour before last, the Foo Fighters back drop was a wall of different speakers all piled on top of each other in a very jumbled order. I met a guy who swore at the HSFestival in Baltimore that he was backstage and all those speakers were working.
    I saw them later in the tour and was closer to the stage. In the middle of all those speakers was their bass player's cab with a mic on it and two Mesa 4/12 cabs with a mic on it.
    I don't believe for a minute they had more than three cabs loaded and working.
    You didn't see any heads so they had to be backstage.
     
  9. JCSouthpawtele

    JCSouthpawtele Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,542
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2009
    Location:
    Middlebury,Indiana
    Yeah and it was there clothes getting washed. I lady came out and put something in and started it up while they were playing. A friend told me it was one of the funniest things he'd seen at a concert.
     
  10. Chuck 909

    Chuck 909 Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    335
    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2006
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    On the other hand.... these (4!) stacks are real, and I bet all of them were turned to "11". :D




    A different era, for sure.
     
  11. umasstele

    umasstele Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,531
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2008
    Location:
    Central Massachusetts
    And then you have Ted Nugent who actually used them! I cant even begin to imagine how loud he was......
     
  12. bradpdx

    bradpdx Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,431
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2006
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    I worked briefly for Celestion and can verify that many empty Marshall cabs were shipped for U.S. distribution to touring bands. They were much lighter to load and utterly unnecessary for the guitarists.

    Rick Nelson in Cheap Trick had several empty head/cabinets from us with working power lights. His "real" rig was a BFDR with a mic.

    When I was a younger man I used to wonder how rock players could stand being in front of multiple cranked Marshalls - it didn't sound like fun at all, just pain. Then the solution became obvious!
     
  13. JCSouthpawtele

    JCSouthpawtele Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,542
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2009
    Location:
    Middlebury,Indiana
    You have to remember also that Marshall made three different model amps. PA Head,Guitar,and Bass. Same front panel. The reason they had 4 input heads was for 4 inputs of 1/4' Mic cable before XLR was invented. Most likely those old concert photos are misleading is that one PA head and stack was a vocal amp,another guitar,another bass and possible one to amp the drum mics. Look closely at any old concert photo or video footage and notice that they would have 2 mics on the singers mic stand taped together. One was for his Amp behind him as a monitor the other sent to the FOH.
    Woodstock was the first real PA with foldback monitor system. The Beatle's,Stone's and The Who played without monitors for the first several years. We don't know how lucky we have it.
     
  14. milocj

    milocj Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    3,576
    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Location:
    Michigan
    I think Brian May's AC-30s all worked. I seem to remember reading an interview with him and he mentioned that he actually used three of the amps during a concert and that he had two backups for each working amp because he ran them so hard.
     
  15. Feargal

    Feargal Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    558
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Location:
    Ireland
    There's a picture floating around here that shows oasis and a blues junior that fits that description. Brings new meaning to the term "wonderwall".
     
  16. Capel

    Capel Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    812
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2007
    Location:
    Capel, West Oz
    Big name bands touring Oz can actually hire empty cabs to macho up their backline (esp. Marshalls - ELFA provide them for endorsees)
     
  17. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    25,993
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2008
    Location:
    Port Moody, BC
    I saw him at a festival in 1980 (or so), and yeah, he wasy WAAAYYYY too loud.

    At the other extreme, did anyone else see John Mellencamp on the tour where he had nothing on stage at all? All the amps and monitors were below the floor. The drums and keys were on stage, but everyone else was wireless, so they didn't have their amps behind them. They sure had a lot of room.
     
  18. TG

    TG Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    11,417
    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2004
    Location:
    The wild west of Ireland
    I think he's been known to use the BJ as a head and run it through Marshall cabs.
     
  19. Woody Relic

    Woody Relic TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    14
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2009
    Location:
    Chicago IL
    At the opposite extreme was J. J. Cale. I saw him at the House of Blues in Chicago in about 2002 and was able to stand right in front of him. He had his (new Korean) Danelectro Convertible guitar, with one (standard) lipstick pickup, and an aftermarket piezo under the bridge. I believe the piezo went into a Crate Taxi, a solid-state practice-size amp that could also run on battery power (for street-corner gigs, hence the "Taxi" name). The lipstick ran into a black Fender Blues Jr. Cale's amps were the loudest thing on the stage. If I spoke loudly I could be heard over the amps. If I moved several feet to the left or right, I could speak in a normal tone of voice and be heard. (I was silent, of course.) My earplugs stayed in my pocket for once. It was wonderful. And bassist Bill Raffensperger later told me that that was one of the LOUDER gigs on the tour! (On another Cale show, Heartbreakers Mike Campbell and Benmont Tench sat in--but that's another story.)

    A friend of mine confirmed the Geddy Lee story--he said a roadie came out and took clothes out and put clothes in between songs.
     
  20. Woody Relic

    Woody Relic TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    14
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2009
    Location:
    Chicago IL
    I was never enough of a Neil Young fan to see him live until I heard the "Greendale" CD, which has one of the best guitar tones I've ever heard on the first two songs--Neil's gold '52 or '53 Les Paul (the backup for "Old Black"), played with fingers (no pick), on the neck P-90. There were other amps onstage, including a solid-state refrigerator-sized Baldwin Exterminator (!), but longtime guitar tech Larry Craig has said, if I recall correctly, that Neil's sound is "90% Deluxe," and that's a low-watt '50s tweed Deluxe.

    I also recall the row of Conn Strobotuners with their black-and-white dials constantly spinning. I counted them, and then had the thought, "Why are there only five of them, when the guitar has six strings?" An embarrassingly long time later--like, a whole minute or two--the answer popped into my head and I had to laugh at myself.

    (If you can't figure it out, post a question here--this can be a trick question, depending on your experience.)
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.