Wait - aren't original Blues Deluxes sought-after/kinda valuable ?

Discussion in 'Glowing Bottle Tube Amp Forum' started by Mike Eskimo, Jun 25, 2019.

  1. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I've seen two lately that were 1994-5 made in USA versions in good shape for $400 or $400 OBO.

    I was under the impression that these were the absolute best of the 30-40 watt HotRod series and commanded prices higher than all of them.

    Is this just another part of the reckoning/larger amp price plummet or have I just not been paying attention ?
     
  2. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Blues DLX and Hot Rod DLX are two different beasts, I believe
     
  3. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Oh - I thought the whole line was called the "hot Rod series" of which the Blues Deluxe was one and even Pro Jrs and Blues Jr's were part of...
     
  4. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Yep that's right, also the DeVille.

    Blues Deluxe is it's own beast though, totally separate from the Hot Rod series
     
  5. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    2019 -1994 = 25 years; or maybe it's time for replacing some electrolytic caps, etc. other servicing...maybe factor that into price?
     
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  6. kookaburra

    kookaburra Tele-Afflicted

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    Hot Rod series came out of the Blues Deluxe/Devilles.

    I gigged a 90s Blues Deluxe, liked it, and I've only plugged in a couple times to someone else's Hot Rod Deluxe. Either works for me, although others find a greater difference than I did. My Hot Rod time was very limited.

    Good point, and the the Blues Deluxe has been reissued at the same price as a Hot Rod.
     
  7. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    The BD are great amps, I don't know about collectible though! I was under the impression that the Hot Rod, Deville and BD etc were all very similar inside with only subtle differences though....? But as far as listening the BD seems to be the best to my ears.
     
  8. MuddyWolf

    MuddyWolf Tele-Meister

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    HRD and BD is the same amp. Only one or 2 componant values different on the schematic. The old ones are not sought after more than newer ones that ive seen. Super loud and need to be cranked to really sound good. I like mine but dont use it very often. Last time i did i got a call from the landlord.
     
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  9. stanger

    stanger Tele-Meister

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    Yes, they are. I once mis-spoke on this forum and called my amp a Hot Rod DeLuxe. It's actually a Blues DeLuxe.
    The Blues amp uses the early Bassman circuitry with reverb and a master volume added. While the amp can be overdriven, it doesn't go nearly as far as the Hot Rod series distortion, and to get the heaviest fuzz the amp needs to be driven very hard with the Master set pretty high. The Volume really comes on strong up to midway, and then past 5, doesn't get much louder, and the distortion isn't real high unless the Master is also turned up. Even then the amp doesn't grind real hard.

    I think that lack of overdrive was what caused Fender to come out with the Hot Rods a few years later. The Hot Rods go into distortion at lower volume levels and go to higher levels of distortion.

    The Blues series was designed to have a thicker, warmer tone that is reminiscent of the late-50s to early 60s sounds. A lot of guitarists then were using a Bassman head with a separate Fender reverb, plugged into a guitar cabinet as a stack. The Blues series put it all into one package.

    Back then, Peavey, Ampeg and some of the other amp companies brought out some old-school amps, and just then, the archtop jazz guitar was going through a big revival. I think Fender issued the Blues as their alternative. A lot of the jazz players liked the Blues amps, but they never sold very well to the rock players of that time.

    I own a single 12, but I like the 4x10 a little better. I bought the single 12 because it was more portable.
    My amp was purchased new in early 1993, and it was all I ever needed playing the clubs. The single 12 is a good amp for plugging an acoustic or a hollowbody electric into, and sounds real good with a Telecaster.

    If I wanted some high distortion, I used an old Ibanez Tube Screamer, which worked quite well with the amp.
    I still have it, and it still sounds just fine, though there are others that are more versatile now.
    regards,
    stanger
     
  10. peteb

    peteb Friend of Leo's

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    The HRD and BD circuits are very similar.


    the BD has vintage and drive channels and was superseded by the HRD with the main difference being the added 'more drive' channel. The more drive channel didn't prove too popular. the BD was reissued, which is very complimentary for a modern PCB based amp. The tweed covering is probably one of the more desirable aspects of the BD over the HRD.




    I could see original Blues Deluxe's having some amount of desirable collectable value to people who have interest and not to people that don't. the fact that it was reissued adds some intangible value.
     
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  11. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    A Reissue of an inexpensively built amp is a simple way to give an inexpensive ‘reissue’ to A customer base that is more attuned to hype than reality...imho. It would be better to move on up to a better level of amp than to repeat an expenditure of funds for an amp that is different only in that ‘reissue’ is printed on the backplate, imho. Said opinion is that of a curmudgeonly old fart who has never lost money on an amp....and who can take a Blues or Hot rod amp and make it sound much better. I don’t care for the quality of the construction, but they are affordable.
    Fwiw, the Pro Sonic was the higher quality amp of that type that Fender built until the decline of the market for such a pricey amp with much higher production value and much greater performance for the user.
     
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  12. peteb

    peteb Friend of Leo's

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    Wally, the pro sonic is a great amp with outstanding features. It’s a different amp than the blues/hot rod series.



    The reason I wanted to post, is to add that the drive channel is an added 3rd pre amp stage and the more drive function is transistor based. It’s not surprising that the blues deluxe has a little bit more of a following than the HRD, but even still, they are basically the same amps.
     
  13. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Pete, imho, the blues/hot rod amps are a growth out of that Pro Sonic approach albeit simpler and built to a much lower price point. That is to say that they all are based on a two gain stages before the tone stack with gain to be inserted into that chain before the tone stack, a long tail pair PI, and fixed bias......with the switching of bias—-and rectification—-in the Pro Sonic being a difference. The Pro Sonic certainly performs beyond any level of the Blues/Hot Rods, but the Blues/Hot Rods come from he same topography.
    The Pro Sonic could be thought of as being an outgrowth of the multistage high Gain Marshall’s. The Soldano that came out in the 1980’s has a 5+1 topography in the high Gain. The Pro Sonic is a 4+1 i; high Gain while being a 2+1 in the clean mode. The Peavey 5150/6505 amps are built in the same manner. Hey, the early Boogies did the same thing...however, they did it differently, in stead of starting with the 2+1 of the 5F6A...cloned by Marshall...., they started with an 1+1 or 1+2 AB763 preamp and dropped the added gain stage in between the input stage and what had been the first gain stage. When Mesa built the Dual Rectifier, they moved into this approach....because they cloned the Soldano SLO 100.
    All of these amps that start out with a 2+1 gain/tone/gain topography from Marshall on owe much to the 5F6A Bassman.
     
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  14. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Hey, they're practically vintage now, so why not?
     
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  15. peteb

    peteb Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks Wally, good comparison.

    I’d say they are both fender and Marshall based, but the pro sonic is also Mesa/Boogie with dual rectifiers, multii class operation and cascaded gain stages.


    Other differences



    The pro sonic is top of the line Pro Tube Series while the HRD/Blues Deluxe is it’s own mid priced series.


    The Pro sonic was offered for a short time.

    The HRD/Blues Deluxe is the most produced amp ever
     
  16. macatt

    macatt Tele-Holic

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    There are thousands of them out there relatively cheap.

    S Mac
     
  17. mexicanyella

    mexicanyella Tele-Holic

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    One of my music buddies in the mid 90s bought a 1994ish tweed Blues Deluxe 1 x 12 and played his 1970s Explorer through it. It was indeed a good-sounding and LOUD amp when you cranked it up.

    That guy owned an old Fane-loaded Hiwatt 4 x 12 cab too and the Blues Deluxe sounded utterly rad driving that big ratty cab as an extension.

    At one point we removed the stock Fender 12 and replaced it with one of the Fane 12s and that was cool too...but not as blast-tastic as driving the whole 4 x 12.
     
  18. Rumblur

    Rumblur Tele-Meister

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    1994-up tweed series amps are scary to me... bought one new, very very unreliable. From what the techs / music stores told me in the 90s they had a very high warranty rate. It was a "warm" sounding amp, but I wouldn't want another one for any price.

    For the record - Ed King's favorite amp of all time was a Hot Rod Deville. Go figure!
     
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  19. bblumentritt

    bblumentritt Tele-Afflicted Platinum Supporter

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    I've known a couple of people to play them, that's about it. They never seemed all that popular or great to me. There is this one guy who loves his 410 de Ville I think it is.
     
  20. tfarny

    tfarny Friend of Leo's

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    I have never thought of any of those amps, new or old, as particularly desirable. They are some of the most common tube amps out there, extremely loud for today's environments, and available all day long for around $400 in various conditions.
     
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