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Vintage or reissue?

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by Jackson753, Oct 30, 2020.

  1. Jackson753

    Jackson753 Tele-Meister

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    Hi,
    I am thinking of buying one of these all from the era 72-81:
    Fender Telecaster Custom
    Fender Telecaster Deluxe
    Fender Telecaster Thinline

    These are more expensive than a reissue. At the moment the Fender American Original 70s caught my attention.

    I have been listening to lots of examples on YouTube.

    In my mind I am thinking I could make a few sacrifices and hunt down an original or I could look at something new.

    I would have to avoid any heavy examples.
    Another route could be to buy an original neck pick up and put that in an American Original. I don't know how different the new CuNiFe are to the original on the only video I listened to without watching I stopped on the original pick up after a few listens but that is just one video and it was close but it's a video on the internet with compression etc...

    If it was a Strat or a blackguard the choice would be made as the originals are way too expensive but the prices appear to be £2.5 - 3.5k or thereabouts for one of these Teles. The new American Original can be had for £1450 over here in the UK. Make me then think a Vintera Custom and put in an expensive original pick up.

    Any advice most welcome.
    Many thanks.
     
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  2. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    If you’re going to actually play it, I’d suggest the reissue.
    I think they are better made, more consistent and are overall a better value.
    I am also not a fan of most of the “vintage” guitars of that era.
    Perhaps the “vintage” model will be a better investment, but if I were investing, it would not be a guitar from that era.
    Just my opinion.
    I’m not saying I’m right.
     
  3. 63telemaster

    63telemaster Tele-Meister

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    You need to play some vintage examples first and see if they are for you or not. I would not go buying a US reissue with the thought of swapping pickups.
     
  4. BobbyJames

    BobbyJames Tele-Meister

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    I think the current re-issues over the last decade have been fantastic. Well built and great sounding, and pretty consistent from what I can tell - that’s more than you can say for a lot of 70s Fenders.
     
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  5. blue metalflake

    blue metalflake Doctor of Teleocity

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    Not so sure there were that many exceptional guitars in that era, especially the models you mention, which had all been “blessed” with some CBS mods.
    You’d probably get a much better instrument by opting for a RI.
     
  6. golfnut

    golfnut Friend of Leo's

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    I've always thought this way. Even the custom shop reissues of the 50's and 60's Fenders are better, more consistent in my mind. But I don't collect them, I play them. I started playing electric in the 70's so I played and owned lots of those mentioned in the OP. At the time I never thought they were necessarily bad as thats what was around and I played them with out a thought. But then by the early 80's I picked up a 1962 tele which was fantastic and also a 1967 tele (for $300) that was not that great. If I'd known how valuable they were gonna be I'd have stuck them under my bed instead of selling them for the real expensive shredder guitars I played from the mid 80's till the early 90's.
    I've played some 50's Teles as well. In recent times I've owned quite a few custom shop teles and a couple strats as well as a masterbuilt nocaster and in my opinion they've been the best playing fenders I've ever owned.
    The vintage reissues I've owned have been fantastic as well.
    After all the Fenders I've experienced the 70's Fenders are my least favorite. But that will have something to do with the fact that 50's guitars are my favorite.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2020
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  7. loopfinding

    loopfinding Tele-Holic

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    yeah idk. i wouldn't drop a bunch of dough for something from that era. especially if it's going to be some early poly experiment, potentially have neck pocket issues, or weigh ten thousand pounds. if you're going for something older for the husk, i would check out the MIJ stuff (fender or squier) from the mid 80s.

    if it's just about a cunife pickup, there's plenty of boutique WRHB reissues you can grab. the magnet in the non-fender ones should not make that much of a difference, just the construction. in the fender ones, well you're talking a decade long range there. an RI cunife pickup is going to sound just as different as an original one is from another original in that long of a stretch.

    but on top of that, buying a vintage cunife is a big gamble. it's a sound a lot of people think they want because of the hype but usually are totally underwhelmed by when they get it. some folks love them, but most folks hate them. there's a big difference between hearing one recorded and playing one.
     
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  8. Dacious

    Dacious Poster Extraordinaire

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    If you're going to play it, buy a new one. Or, wait six months until they start discounting or the new buyers are deciding it's not them and selling at a loss - let someone else take the depreciation hit.
     
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  9. Blues Twanger

    Blues Twanger Tele-Meister

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    I will also cast my vote for the reissue, especially if you plan to play it a lot. The good vintage guitars aren't the ones for sale. The ones for sale would need to be picked over, taking months if not years. A new reissue is a new guitar, it is what it is from day one and ready to go.
     
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  10. Jackson753

    Jackson753 Tele-Meister

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    I essentially do want it to play. The reissue is definitely appealing more now that you guys have helped with your knowledge and experience. I used to look in the back of the Melody Maker when I was a kid at the library at school and after school in Southfields Library. This would have been from 1979 on wards. There were just old guitars and the best at the time were the Fenders and Gibsons. I had a go of a friends natural 73 Stratocaster. It played better than anything me and my other friends had. That cost used £150 at the time with the case I had a little Hofner that to me looked like it was a bit agricultural and primitive. I think someone may have stripped the original finish and stained it orange. By the mid 80s I bought a Westbury Deluxe which was a bit heavy for a small guitar but very well made. I also bought a Tokai Strat that was light and felt like a step up in the world. I gave the Hofner away. I remember that the papers were flooded with unwanted Fenders. I liked the look of the Custom, Thinline and the Deluxe. I really liked the mocha finish. Looking back these were just old guitars with not a very good reputation but I was young and happy with the Tokai Strat. Then something changed and prices of used guitars kept rising. I think what you guys have been saying is true and there are good ones but they aren't for sale. I guess I got sucked in. In 2006 I bought an EJ Strat it's a take on a 57. Now the stickiness has gone I play it and it's a really well built and sounding instrument. I probably just need the equivalent new issue Telecaster Custom from Fender.

    I do have an American Telecaster that I was toying with the idea of putting a TV Jones in the neck but it has now crossed my mind it could be a candidate for one of the new Fender CuNiFe pick ups? It was a thought that just crossed my mind.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2020
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  11. Telekarster

    Telekarster Tele-Meister

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    IMO - Only buy vintage because you collect vintage, and "maybe" make a profit if/when you sell it. Otherwise, buy new and call it good. I've got a 2001 AVRI 57 Strat that I wouldn't get rid of for nothin'! She is as sweet as they get. The AVRI's are really good these days and are very close to the original vintage specs, and worth the $ vs. true vintage IMO. Whatever you do, try to play before you buy it and make sure the company you're buying from has a good return policy, in case you don't like it etc....
     
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  12. fender4life

    fender4life Friend of Leo's

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    Fender makes far better guitars today than in that era. I's go with a RI. Not even a question for me. At the price they are selling the new cunife for i have to think they are as good, and today they are far more concerned with fine details and consistency than they were back then. And if they still don't sound the same buy a original set. They are likely going to come way down in price if they haven't already because with brand new cunife models available at 1/2 the cost of an original set, sellers will have to come way down or they will never sell them. I would however wager good money the new ones are great as WRHB's go. Anyways, if it were me no way i'd buy an original for a number of reeasons.
     
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  13. Telefan33

    Telefan33 Tele-Meister

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    I have played and compared a Fender Classic Series '72 Telecaster Custom and a vintage Fender '70s Telecaster Custom. The broken in feel of the vintage Fender was really great in my hands. The pickups sounded great in the original and the guitar I thought was worth the asking price. The MIM Fender wasn't to my liking TBH. They both had the poly finishes if that matters to you. The new American Original has got nitro finish and a different radius fingerboard than the vintage model. I'm still wondering if Fender will release a Vintera Road Worn '72 Telecaster Custom?
     
  14. Piotr

    Piotr Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I've bought a vintage Deluxe before the new CuNiFes appeared on the market. It was a stressful purchase (a player's grade specimen), but turned out really well. Love the feel of the vintage guitar. Maybe that's funny, but the feel is inspiring for me. The newer Fenders feel consistently "plasticky" to me, for a lack of better word. Haven't played the AO Custom yet, though.
     
  15. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Yeah.

    There are some exceptional old ones, but most of them aren't close to that. The few that really stand out, are usually in the hands of people who use them to good end and intend to donate 'em to a playing friend, when they pass on or can no longer play. The Reissues sometimes have items (tuning machines) I detest, but they're so much more consistently decent.
     
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  16. Rufustelestrats

    Rufustelestrats Tele-Holic

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    Rmember the RI is like a resto mod hot rod. It looks old but has the improvements that 20/20 hindsight can provide. Sure a original 72 might seem cool, but then again they were not popular at the time because they did have issues that are well documented including quality control and tolerance issues. The reissues seem to me better built. Even my MIM 72 Thinline seems nicer than the originals in feel and play-ability. The pickups are another issue entirely but with the new AO they may have solved this question. I will say I the winter brings us a 72 reissue custom or Thinline with the new pickups I may sell something to get it.
     
  17. Slim Chance

    Slim Chance Tele-Afflicted

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    New guitars – They make them better than they used to.
    Vintage amps – They don't make them like they used to.
     
  18. Minivan Megafun

    Minivan Megafun Tele-Holic Gold Supporter

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    Current production Fender guitars are leaps and bounds above the quality of the 1970's guitars. People have gotten so caught up in the "it's old so it must be better" mentality that they forget how bad so many of those CBS Fenders were. Back in the 90's you almost couldn't GIVE AWAY a 70's Fender. There's a reason the phase "pre-CBS" used to mean something.

    The few 70's Fenders I've had in my hands were awful. The neck pockets looked like they'd been cut by a child.
     
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  19. Strebs

    Strebs Tele-Meister

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    Lately, I've been looking at guitar purchases as temporary measures. I have one guitar that I don't plan on selling, but the rest are fine but nothing special. I'll pass them on, probably pretty quickly, for about what I paid for them.

    If you get an AVRI used, you are likely to be able to sell it fairly quickly for around what you bought it for. If you don't bond with a vintage instrument, it may take longer to find the right buyer unless you list it low.
     
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  20. Jackson753

    Jackson753 Tele-Meister

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    I agree that vintage market is much smaller it will be slower to sell if you don't bond.
    Taking on board all the comments in the thread the reissue make more sense especially the AVRI series which after doing more research is a popular series with high praise. With the production technology as advanced as it is the guitars on the whole must be better.
     
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