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Vintage Bicycles

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Stanford Guitar, Oct 19, 2020.

  1. Nightclub Dwight

    Nightclub Dwight Tele-Afflicted

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    I used to keep a junker bike locked at the train station for times I'd get caught riding the train home unexpectedly. When I moved away I just unlocked it, took the lock with me and left the bike for the next guy.
     
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  2. Nightclub Dwight

    Nightclub Dwight Tele-Afflicted

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    I have that exact same Rockhopper! I've ridden it on both coasts, but never coast to coast. Its currently stored in the rafters of my garage awaiting a some day restoration. I love that old bike.

    Is that a Blackburn rack? Totally twins.
     
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  3. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Mmmm, I like old Dura Ace better than older Campy but Italian is awful pretty!
     
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  4. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    509D7ADF-34A9-4CE8-9DA9-DE60F464156F.jpeg 0332FA1C-B930-400D-9395-3083E5EDA43B.jpeg This old Olmo got Japanese and Canadian parts as usual, I think that goes well with Italian but I may not be typical.
    All Dura Ace brakes and derailleurs but XTR shifters is my usual combo.
    This got Roval wheels built for cyclocross AFAIK, cool but noisy.
    Heavy tires too but this is a beater bike.
     
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  5. WingedWords

    WingedWords Tele-Afflicted

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    Just out of interest I put my late 70s Roy Thame on a cheap metric scale this morning. Just on 10kg which is close enough to 22lb for me. It's the same tubing and the same size as the Allin and a similar spec so I'd imagine they're close in weight.

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  6. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    The cassette will way a bit more than the single cog on the single speed.

    I just sold my Time VXS, purchased late 2002/early 2003. What an amazing bike. Carbon fiber, but looked very much like a classic bike. Also rode very much like a steel bike-- didn't feel too dead or stiff like many of today's carbon bikes with super oversized tubing. I have been using my new gravel bike a lot more due to its more comfortable position and decided to let the Time go. A young guy just getting into road biking bought it and I'm happy it's going to a good home....

    IMG_3472 (1).jpg
     
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  7. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I built up a single speed from an old PX-10 frame and gave it sew up tires and a single front brake, worked great for NYC which is flat and I rode every day so stayed in shape.

    As far as the weight saved with a single speed it’s narrowed with modern tech including titanium.

    Here’s an older 8 speed derailleur and a 9speed cassette, under a pound so figure with a cable and shifter hits a full pound to have some rear gears.

    Bigger weight gains and losses are in wheels, tires and seat.
    I use steel & thick leather Brooks saddles but still stay under 22lbs including 18 speeds and a pretty huge frame size.
    I think 60cm which is quite large and invariably built with heavier butted tubing assuming a rider that tall is also pretty heavy.
    Steel frames come in many varieties of tubing, even within the branded Reynolds or Columbus. Columbus alone has a dizzying array of tubings and it’s hard to tell which on is in an older racing frame that was probably ordered to spec for the racer.
     
  8. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    Another pound sounds about right, all else being equal.
     
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  9. Robert H.

    Robert H. Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    I'm not sure it's "Vintage" - but here's my 1994 Yokota Yosemite Mountain bike. Back in action since Covid-19 shutdown.

    upload_2020-10-21_11-41-38.png
     
  10. Lonn

    Lonn Friend of Leo's

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    I missed out on 2 vintage 50s and 60s Schwinns this morning by about 5 minutes for $50 each. Recent eBay sales put them about $400-500 each. Oh well.
     
  11. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    What Schwinns command that $$?

    I shop at the dump and would grab any Stingray but no Varsity or Continental.
    Had them all as a kid but only really loved the Stingray.
    Still have the old stick shift somewhere in the garage!
     
  12. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    For the sake of this thread I'd propose 8 rear cogs or less, cantilever brakes on mtbs, and center pulls on road bikes qualifies as VINTAGE. That stuff is pretty primitive!

    For me it might be pre freehub, but I don't want to be exclusionary!
    All my restomod bikes are pre freehub frames with way post freehub components.

    That means I have to cold set or just yank the rear triangles to squeeze the longer freehub axle into the old 5-7-7 speed freewheel spec frame spacing.
    Additionally I have to tweak the frame line, additionally badly because I run MTB cranks with road frames/ wheels/ derailleurs.

    No modern MTB 135mm axles in my stable, IIRC!
     
  13. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    Now there's 148 mm boost spacing, the new standard!
     
  14. tintag27

    tintag27 Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Stripped down racer...
    My brother is the cyclist of the family, so I pinched a photo of one of his bikes. This is a Tony Parsons frame, 531 Nervex Pro circa 1956... and the rest of it accumulated over 40 years! Apparently it is now extremely difficult to find the tubular tyres to fit those rims, so it hangs from the garage rafters these days... He has something much more modern and hi-tec to ride now...
    You couldn't get more minimalist than this beauty!

    Screen Shot 2020-10-21 at 23.09.12.png
     
  15. Stanford Guitar

    Stanford Guitar Tele-Holic

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    Now there is superboost 157mm spacing.
     
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  16. DesmoDog

    DesmoDog Tele-Afflicted

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    Yep it's a Blackburn.

    Unfortunately it's a touch small for me. I bought it after taking my provious bike to Aspen on e summer and deciding it was a touch too big for off road stuff. So I bought this instead... and never rode off road again.

    It's got fancier wheels than a stock bike, as I recall we pulled the front wheel out of the box for a warranty claim and then built up a pair to replace them. Or maybe it was just the rim we pulled off of it. I dunno. It was a long time ago.

    I may turn it back into an off road bike when I rebuild it. Haven't decided yet.
     
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  17. blackguts

    blackguts Tele-Meister

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    I love smokin' the chiba and riddin' this around 20201021_141231.jpg
     
  18. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Kids today!
    Get off my lawn!
    You don’t need no dang 157mm axle spacing!
    Push or spin the gears ya got!

    I reckon 157 is fat bike?
    Another fad that will be gone in ten years!
    Mark my words!
     
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  19. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I have some tubulars and used to ride them in NYC, which many thought would not work out well. I still have a new pair but they might be eight years old.
    Gotta be some makers still selling them?
    Pretty strange old tech, you glue the tire to the rim.
     
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  20. Stanford Guitar

    Stanford Guitar Tele-Holic

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    The wider spacing is for downhill bikes that require stronger wheels. The extra spacing allows a better dish for a stronger wheel.
     
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