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Vintage Bicycles

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Stanford Guitar, Oct 19, 2020.

  1. Boil

    Boil Tele-Holic

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    I remember those from back in England, there was 1 kid who had one, the 9 year old me thought it was the coolest thing I had ever seen.
    The 59 year old me still thinks it's pretty cool.
     
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  2. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    When I was maybe 9 or 10 years old on Christmas morning my Dad pretended that they forgot to get me a Christmas present. I was crying and wailing and snuffling. Then he said, "wait, go look in the garage". In the garage was a cool 3-speed chopper style bike with a stick-shift shifter on the top tube, banana seat, big ape-hanger bars. It was SO cool. But what an idiot my Dad was to pretty much ruin what would have been unmitigated happiness by first pretending I didn't get anything at all.

    On the other hand, I remember that moment to this day, around 47 years later, so maybe he was just trying to ensure that he forged a lasting memory. That said, I also remember perfectly some of the other best presents he gave to me over the years, even though those were not preceded by an unnecessary, harrowing bout of unhappy crying.

    And so we go from bikes to psychotherapy, just like that! LOL.
     
  3. fjblair

    fjblair Tele-Holic

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    I had a real swell yellow Schwinn Le Tour back in the day.
     
  4. Chiogtr4x

    Chiogtr4x Poster Extraordinaire

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    My family and I love watching American Pickers on TV, and yesterday, Mike came across one of these ' big wheel' bikes ( beat, but he loves them), and we thought:
    " How did these bikes even come to be? They look like a real PITA- were they a novelty, or for say for ( dangerous) sport?
     
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  5. Stanford Guitar

    Stanford Guitar Tele-Holic

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    The history of the rear drive chain "safety" bicycle is pretty fascinating.
     
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  6. Wrighty

    Wrighty Friend of Leo's

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    Anyone remember the original Moultens? Front and rear suspension in the late 60s and 16” wheels. I seem to remember a Standard, de Luxe and racing version with derailleur gears.

    I also remember at a local fete years ago a guy had a bike with a gearbox in the steering which meant that turning Tge handlebars left turned the front real right and vice versa. £100 was offered to anyone who could ride it 20 yards between to parallel lines. Apparently the owner’s cash had been safe fir 18 months and 50 outings.
     
  7. WingedWords

    WingedWords Tele-Afflicted

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    Moultons? Yes, my first new bicycle was a 1965 Green deluxe, 4 speed hub gear, chrome mudguards, front and rear carriers and bags. Like this

    1965_moulton_drive_side_bootiebike.jpg

    It was heavy and broke rear wheel spokes regularly, but I used it heavily until I got motorised about 10 years later. In the mid 80's I rebuilt one with much better wheels and tyres, sourced from the more recent spaceframe AM version and it worked fine until I toured Brittany on it and broke the rear forks ascending Mont Dol. Great fun though, causing various French coureur wannabees to scratch their heads.

    The current AM series are wonderful machines and super expensive. I'd love one, but they're way out of my reach and I feel the whole concept is something of a solution looking for a problem. Tony Hadland has written thorough books on the old and new versions.

    https://www.abebooks.co.uk/book-search/title/the-moulton-bicycle/author/hadland/

    Big fan of my Brompton now. There was a Moulton Stowaway

    moulton_stowaway_morris_boot_1000.jpg

    But my Brompton is way more practical as a folder

    20201016_174402.jpg
     
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  8. Goldenshellback

    Goldenshellback Tele-Meister

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    Not vintage but it’s a good bike that actually gets ridden 3-4 times a week. F4FD371A-37FA-4756-99A1-7005E3423ECE.jpeg
     
  9. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Here’s one of my old steel race frames in light blue hanging up, from circa 1977 when some big race was won on an Italian Ciocc.
    This one I gave Campy headset and pedals, but mostly dura ace and XTR.

    The other is a Ciocc from a few years later, both built up with modern tech like indexing gears etc, plus messenger bike style flat bars on road bikes.
    Rode NYC streets for years where that style really made sense, battling motorists in tight quarters. Sorry for the messy garage pics...

    1C935639-7352-4D7E-BF02-BAAFE024E238.jpeg CC46BB38-5C2F-41E0-9AAB-86E9054D1441.jpeg
     
  10. Veitchy

    Veitchy Tele-Afflicted

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    Some of the old drainpipe 10-speeds are heavy for sure (I used to ride one). A lot of those Ritcheys would have been decent Tange or True Temper steel (don't recall him ever using Reynolds) and are sitting at a reasonable weight for a steel frame. A big place you can save weight if you want to 'resto-mod' one is the wheels - modern alloy wheels are significantly lighter for similar or better strength. I don't tend to mind the older components because I'm weird and like stuff like downtube shifters. Granted, most of the bikes of that era aren't Ritcheys, those great Petersen-era Bridgestones, or the like, so there's that.

    Ultimately, once you add the weight of the rider, most bikes drop to single-digit percentages in weight anyway.

    What sort of racing did you do back in the day? The pre-MTB US competitions are interesting to me as all you tend to ever hear about are the European races.
     
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  11. hepular

    hepular Tele-Holic

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    Ned Overend. Joe Murray. John Tomac. Cindy Whitehead (by whom I was lapped during a race in San Antonio--in which she broke her seat-post on lap 1 and rode the whole thing out of the saddle. [During same race, our local phenom gal wrapped her brand-new custom ritchey around an abandoned washing machine on the course--which made her match her partner, who had destroyed a 2-week old Raleigh 853 road frame when the front-wheel slipped into a drainage thing and the down-tube crumpled like a beer-can.]

    Dudes would be hanging out before and after the races (Joe more 'mellow' than Ned). The hip thing was to swap cheap-ass shimano light-action medium-cage rear mechs for deore or whatever cuz they shifted faster, and, at like $15, you didn't care if you wrapped one around a tree.
     
  12. Engine Swap

    Engine Swap Tele-Afflicted

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    @Stanford Guitar - that IS mint. Hope it's your size. Incredibly clean.

    Now for something completely different...

    1981 Schwinn Superior

    [​IMG]

    Mid-80s Battaglin Cromor

    [​IMG]

    Ciocc Designer 84

    [​IMG]

    Probably have over 30000 miles on these collectively. Just ticked over 2100 miles for the season.
     
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  13. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I rode too many of those old lugged frame beauties from the 70’s when I was saving up for a contemporary Road bike in the 80’s.

    cool/great to see/brings back memories/I never need to ride one again ! :lol:
     
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  14. Stanford Guitar

    Stanford Guitar Tele-Holic

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    This one is not lugged, fillet brazed.
     
  15. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Fillet brazing isn’t very common on light weight road frames, more often on mountain bikes that need the frame to withstand hitting rocks and otherwise worse punishment than road race bikes.
    The thinner tempered butted Reynolds, Tange or Columbus tubing is generally silver soldered into lugs, which in the end makes a lighter stronger frame than brazing.
    The problem with brazing is it’s done at a higher temperature that removes the heat treating from the tempered tubing.
    Low temperature silver solder is much like electronics solder, but done with a torch.

    Good fillet brazing can make a great frame, but not as light AND strong as silver soldered lugged steel.
    Cheaper lugged frames are brazed too, sort of worst of both worlds.

    As far as weight improvements now vs lugged steel, you can easily get an 18lb lugged steel bike, where carbon etc doesn’t even shave ten lbs off that old tech.
    Bikes like the classic Schwinn Varsity I used to own weigh in around 43lbs!

    So old tech steel frames are closer to 21st C high tech than to what most of us experienced in the ‘70s if we had a consumer steel road bike.
     
  16. Ivorytooth

    Ivorytooth Tele-Meister

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    I bought this one new. I put the fork and bars, stem, saddle on a year later. It really isn't vintage, but the young guys sure think so. I just rebuilt it with NOS Shimano XT-780s stuff and a Deore crankset and bottom bracket. So the current rebuild was for both derailleurs, crankset, bottom bracket. New wheels built with XT hubs, new cassette, V brakes. It rides nice. I have been having a blast on singletrack. This thing climbs great and I like to climb. Only thing original is the pedals and seatpost on this frame.

    1991 Rockhopper Comp

    20200925_192520.jpg
     
  17. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    Ivorytooth, I think I had the RockShox just before that one-- you had to inject air into it (or was it oil?) using a hypodermic needle.

    Around that same Ritchey era I had a nice Bridgestone RB1. It looked just like this one:

    upload_2020-10-19_16-47-20.png


    Around that same time I raced mountain bikes on a Marin Team Issue-- looked a lot like this but with a day-glo orange frame. I think I was still using toe-clips, though.

    upload_2020-10-19_16-49-15.png
     
  18. Nahtabot

    Nahtabot Tele-Meister

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    I dumpster dive to save French bicycles. Not real high end but I refuse to let them go to scrap.

    STA72510.JPG STA72511.JPG STA72515.JPG STA72517.JPG
     
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  19. kingofdogs1950

    kingofdogs1950 Tele-Afflicted

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    Back in the day men were iron and bicycles were wooden.
    I worked for years in a pro bike shop in Houston.
    Didn't make big $$, but one job benefit was getting all bikes, etc at 'pro deal' prices.
    Pro, or promotional, deals are were bike shop employees are able to buy bikes directly from suppliers for personal use at ~half of the regular wholesale.
    I bought and sold dozens and dozens of high quality bikes (think Ritchey, Colango, Masi, Seven, Fat Chance, Cinelli, Merlin, Ibis, etc).
    I would ride a new bike for a year or so and turn it for more than it cost me.
    Fun, fun, fun!
    I sold my last bike a year ago.
    Ritchey Annapurna, bought new in 1984.
    Sadly I can no longer ride due to medical problems.

    M
     
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  20. Stanford Guitar

    Stanford Guitar Tele-Holic

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    Cool article on Tom's brazing technique.

    https://us.ritcheylogic.com/us_en/meet-tom
     
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