very confused on Nocaster vs Twisted tele pickups

Discussion in 'Just Pickups' started by whitewave, Aug 11, 2014.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Rob DiStefano

    Rob DiStefano Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    75
    Posts:
    10,407
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2003
    Location:
    Free Jersey
    yer making a general statement in trying to quantify two completely different pickups, and that's near impossible. particularly with regards to "output", which is a word that shouldn't really be used in conjunction with passive transducers since these gizmos won't work without preamps and amps and That's where the real output comes. "output" with passive pickups is part of its tone definition - the more wire that goes around a bobbin, the less treble and the more midrange and "output". for the most part, given the same "output", the 43/3 will not be as "fat" as the 42/5 - there are exceptions, but this is the norm.

    you will probably best be served with a 42/5 well wound engine nestled in yer tele's bridge.
     
    elementfrvr likes this.
  2. whitewave

    whitewave TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    21
    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2006
    Location:
    Italy
    thank you
     
  3. Rob DiStefano

    Rob DiStefano Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    75
    Posts:
    10,407
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2003
    Location:
    Free Jersey
    you are most welcome, sir. ciao!
     
  4. Gretev1

    Gretev1 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    32
    Posts:
    142
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2018
    Location:
    Switzerland
    In 2013 or 2014 Fender made a run of 1951 Nocasters with Twisted Tele pickups so this was very common.
    The Nocaster pickups and Twisted Tele pickups are very different in my opinion.
    The Nocaster bridge pickup is very trebly and ice picky. Extremely shimmery highs like what you would expect from a vintage 1951 Nocaster or 1952 Telecaster. That typical very bright and trebly blackguard sound. And the Nocaster neck pickup is rounder but almost muffled sounding with a lot of bass.

    The Twisted Tele bridge pickup is glassy, much rounder and very Stratty sounding. A very sweet and balanced tone. The neck pickup is that typical bluesy, round Strat blues tone with very clear pronunciation in both pickups. Honestly, these pickups are my favorite Tele pickups I have ever heard. Maybe even the nicest Fender pickups ever. They sound better than a Strat even.

    If you want Tele pickups with „bark“ I would go with „black guard pickups“ or „broadcaster pickups“ which is the same thing. They have much more pronounced mids and less high end and therefore yield a kind of dirty „bark“ tone when cranked.
     
    Tommyd55 likes this.
  5. Rob DiStefano

    Rob DiStefano Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    75
    Posts:
    10,407
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2003
    Location:
    Free Jersey
    modern pickups that use vintage fender pickup labels may or may not be true to "vintage spex", mostly "may not" because there were no absolute fender pickup standards. the first fender guitar was a "spanish guitar", later named "esquire" for both one and two pickups, later named "broadcaster" in the fall/winter of '50, and then "no name" in january of '51 due to the gretsch drums name confusion. from '49 to early '51 all fender bridge pickups were built with 43awg coil wire over a3 rod magnets. DCR values for these pickups were all over the map, from as little as 5k to near 10k as noted in nacho's "blackguard" tome. i wouldn't call that a fender "standard". in the spring of '51 don randall coined the "telecaster" name and for some part of '51 there were "transitional" bridge pickups that used 42awg coil wire over a3 rod mags, and somewhere in mid to late '51 or early '52 coil wire and mags were "standardized" to 42awg coil wire over a5 rod mags. hope this helps ... if anything, you may come to realize how non-standard were most 50's fenders. ;)
     
    Telekarster and Gretev1 like this.
  6. Mauma

    Mauma TDPRI Member

    Age:
    41
    Posts:
    90
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2020
    Location:
    Argentina
    Hi Rob!

    You sure know a lot about pickups.

    I have an AM STD Telecaster 2011 Made in USA with stock pickups, only mod I did was adding the base plate.

    Specs mention: Pickups: 2 American Tele® Single-Coil Pickups (Neck & Bridge) Pickup Switching: 3-Position Blade: Position 1. Bridge Pickup Position 2. Bridge and Neck Pickups Position 3. Neck Pickup Controls: Master Volume, Master Delta ToneTM, (The Delta ToneTM System Includes High Output Bridge Pickup and Special No-Load Tone Control)

    Do you think it'll make much of a difference changing the pickups? I was looking at the Twisted and the Nocasters that's how I arrived here.

    My only concern is spending that much and ending on a pretty similar soundscape to the stock ones.

    Appreciate your thoughts!

    Thanks,
    AA
     
  7. Rob DiStefano

    Rob DiStefano Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    75
    Posts:
    10,407
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2003
    Location:
    Free Jersey
    a small part of me knowing some stuff about leo's guitars was being there with my dad back in '53 when i was a dumb kid and he was building and working on guitars, but the larger part is doing research and learning by way of others. i do have a passion of sorts for leo's pickups and guitars. ;)

    there are only two reasons for changing a pickup - it either is dead as door nail and might get a new life as a rewind, or yer not happy with how it sounds for one or more very real reasons. other than that, no need to change what'cha got that clearly does work well!
     
    Telekarster likes this.
  8. ChrisDowning

    ChrisDowning TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    78
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2012
    Location:
    Devizes
    Sorry - I'm 7 years late!!

    The Twisted are Strat like and the Nocaster is like a retro Tele. Now here's the thing ... we all think we like that retro sound ... but actually we are now used to more 'engineered' retro sound. Those pups are not actually built like those early 50's pups. Hence the Twisted. Hotter bridge and a neck pickup that has many Strat like dynamics. Twisted is more a session player's version of classic Tele - do anything monster. Nocaster is somewhat like the real deal - but difficult to get it right for a band situation that is anything other than traditional country IMO. I replaced my neck Nocaster for a Lollar Royal T which is mighty close to what Fender do with the Twisted - close to a Strat neck pup.
     
    Telekarster likes this.
  9. pi

    pi Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    402
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2003
    Location:
    bay area, CA
    This is not my experience. Nocaster bridge isn't that trebly. I think the A3 magnets soften the attack a bit. And the neck is bright and airy, not muffled at all.

    It's like you're describing an entirely different pickup set than the one I have. I wonder if we have different ears, or different gear, that contributes more to the sound than the actual pickups?

    I tried a twisted tele neck pickup, because it got so many rave reviews. I can see what people like about it, but I actually preferred the Nocaster neck so swapped it back--it made a better match for the Nocaster bridge.
     
    misterdontmove likes this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.