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Using an X-Carve CNC router to make an electric guitar.

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by guitarbuilder, Jul 28, 2018.

  1. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The carve top you did is really nice. Now you need to build a cnc machine.....
     
  2. Scatter Lee

    Scatter Lee Friend of Leo's

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    follow the buzzards
    checking it out but the more I check into it the more I think I need to make a copy carver first

    the top carve busted my brain a couple times but I got it solid




    have you done a carved top yet?
     
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  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Yes, but I didn't draw the top myself. The point manipulation drives me crazy. I had a carved top file I digitized from a Gibson body and one I gleaned from the internet.

    lesgt.jpg
     
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  4. oldrebel

    oldrebel Friend of Leo's

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    I have next week off. Maybe with the help from you all I can get one drawn. Thanks to you all for offering to help!!
     
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  5. nickhofen

    nickhofen Friend of Leo's

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    Oldrebel.
    I do not know if you can see my last pm,maybe your file is full,so I reply here also.
    I need your email so I can send you the videos.
     
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  6. jvin248

    jvin248 Doctor of Teleocity

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    As I'm drawing up a neck I have thought about how to approach an angled headstock for the future.

    Given the headstock breakage anxiety of traditional solid lumber carving that Gibson is known for, and the success of scarf-joint headstocks, I'll set up the neck to carve it all flat but in two pieces. Then do the flip and glue (probably some magic needed with the post-cnc leveling/jointing). Or I'll carve it all flat so the headstock is upside down to the main part of the neck (that will look weird!), with a kerf allowance added for the nut location, and then chop saw and glue afterward. The headstock end of the neck may need extra material that is sanded down to compensate for shifting glue-ups of a post-cut neck -- the skunk strip could help with that alignment.

    Most factories with scarf joints are cutting and gluing the blank then machining the hockey-stick-shaped boards to the final state. Just Fixturing and programming and no vertical challenges to do all that like a desktop cnc.

    The typical scarf flip method image of cutting the neck blank, from the Internet. I like #1 the best as there is more glue surface and strength. I have seen and repaired some glue-starved scarf joints though.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2018
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  7. GunsOfBrixton

    GunsOfBrixton Tele-Afflicted

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    How is #2 more glue area? Only if you are counting on gluing a faceplate on top of the headstock. If you are just talking about the area where the one piece is glued to the other then they are the same.
     
  8. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The other thing to consider is where the visible glue line ends up on the back. I've done it both ways and don't like the way either one looks visually which is why I go one piece.
     
  9. jvin248

    jvin248 Doctor of Teleocity

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    Typo, should have been #1. I updated the post. The headstock slab is sandwiched between the neck slab and the fingerboard slab, so glued in on two sides.

    .
     
  10. jvin248

    jvin248 Doctor of Teleocity

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    .

    Curiosity ... I messed around with my in-process Fender-style flat neck for experimenting to see what would be involved in trying to CNC the parts to work as a Gibson-styled angled headstock with a scarf joint on a simple desktop CNC. both have a challenge, the second one may use less wood.

    This makes for an easy saw cut of the heel from the headstock, I didn't include a web that would be left between the two pieces on the CNC to keep them as one wood strip. The thin sections of the glue surfaces will bend unless those are the 'down' sides for the board as each side is cut and flipped over. Views are 'bottom', side, 'top', isometric. Accurate sanding required before glue up.
    [​IMG]

    Neck blank is longer here so that the truss slot can be cut on both pieces (no overlapping wood). Follow the two sides of the insert strip with an accurate chop saw to separate the parts and flip the headstock. This may not need as much careful sanding before glue up, if the saw holds true.
    [​IMG]

    A challenge either way. I'll probably keep working on the flat style neck for now, but it was useful for me to see how it might work out.

    .
     
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  11. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I decided to switch gears and try a paddlehead neck. I still need to make a perimeter cut. I left the wood in the machine because I'll have to redo that file as well as the skunk stripe, plug hole ramp, and dots/nut. This is what I buzzed out this morning. You are looking at poplar not maple.

    Standard tele neck shaft with a paddlehead the same thickness as a tele neck. 7.25 fretboard radius. It took about 65 minutes altogether to cut what you see. I can probably boost the feed rate some and I'll put in some no cut zones to shorten up the time.


    I used 4 pieces of dowels as registration pins. I used the xcarve to drill the holes in the plywood table and the blank. I drilled through the blank on my drill press to ensure round holes. CNCing holes with a devise like this doesn't guarantee concentricity. The registration worked OK. I'll know better when I take it out of the waste.


    paddletop.jpg


    paddleback.jpg
     
  12. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

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    Neck looks nice!

    Marty I've been thinking about this whole flipping thing. I've done it several times with registration holes with mitigated results. Seeing you struggled as well on the previous neck made me wonder. Furthermore, I'm trying to modify my working habits. Trying to keep my spoilboard unspoiled.

    I was thinking I would do it this way.

    1. Make design so the X and Y zero are in the center of part to cut.
    2. Install stock on the spoilboard making sure it is parallel to the cutting
    3. Square the stock
    4. Find the four edges with probe and center X and Y accordingly.
    5. When I flip, I do not need any kind of registration, all I need to do is to put the sock parallel to the cutting, find the four edges and center X and Y accordingly.
    I know it's more work, but I will not drill registration holes in the spoilboard and I can place the stock wherever, as long as it is parallel. A simple jig can make this happen easily.

    Does it make sense?
     
  13. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Yes Andre, it makes sense. I used to use a fence on the K2 to make part placement easier. If my neck blanks were a uniform width than you could set up two fences on each side to ensure they were centered and a pin at the other end for distance forward or back. One of the issues I think I experienced with the skunk stripe centering was that there isn't a lot of wood contact on the back side once that is machined.

    Another complication with the x carve is the low clearance of the x axis. This means clamps need to be short too.
     
  14. jvin248

    jvin248 Doctor of Teleocity

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    .

    One solution I saw for accurate flipping is a guy put a second plywood sheet on top of the spoil board and cut a rectangle at the extents of his machine -- he wanted the machine to basically define his 'square' sides to itself. Then he used the 'square' sides for the flip alignment and said he had great results. lower left as 'A' and upper left as 'B'.

    I almost did that but changed mine around so I have a 'T'-square setup so the CL goes down the X axis to the right about the middle of the CNC and side 'A' is tight to the lower side and 'B' is tight to the upper side. The L leg is just to keep things square before and after (there will be more left on the blank at the end, the L just protects the important region).

    I keep wondering if I should do an embedded truss rod and glue the fretboard on second or stay with the skunk stripe. I have 3/4 neck boards plus 1/4 fretboards so I'll be gluing regardless either before or after carving. I'll probably test out this flip concept with glue first as I have it here and if the flip works I'll redesign the neck parts to glue the fretboard after.

    The other difference is my current design is built around 1x3 boards not the typical 1x4 so I don't have a waste ring. If all goes well I'll only have 20mm block at the heel to cut off and sand. Operative word is if all goes well...

    centernecks.jpg
     
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  15. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I decided to just run the perimeter cut and " drill " the peghead holes. I removed the neck from the waste. I purposely left about 1/16" thick wood at the bottom to hold it together along with a couple tabs. After clean up it looks pretty good.

    DSC06165.JPG

    DSC06166.JPG

    DSC06167.JPG
     
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  16. sergiomajluf

    sergiomajluf Tele-Meister

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    Hi guitarbuilder, in the third picture it seems that the backside roundover does reach the edge of the fretboard. If that's the case, it has to do with the tool path and tool setup, running "inside" the path. It happened to me.

    Keep us posted! Great work.
     
  17. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Thanks. I tried to reduce the overall cut time by constraining the work area and I guess I should have expanded my margins a bit. It's a bit of a learning curve but I'm making progress. I have one more upgrade I'm thinking of doing and that is to go with 9mm timing belts and gears. If that doesn't get it done with a touch more accuracy, then that'll be that for this machine.
     
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