Unpopular opinions about musicians

ShortintheSleeve

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Um. They are, almost by definition, world-changing. They changed the way we think about storytelling, about thinking, about the human condition. I can’t imagine what makes you suggest otherwise.

Do you think that they’re among the most-taught and studied writers in the Western world because they are trivial?
I have a degree in English and teach literature; I also love Bob Dylan. Dylan had no business winning a Nobel Prize for Literature.
 

ShortintheSleeve

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What might be my most unpopular guitar-related opinion:

Most of the guitars on Big Star albums sound thin and a bit wimpy. And I say that as someone who finds a lot of their songs unimpeachably great as songs.
 

David Barnett

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What might be my most unpopular guitar-related opinion:

Most of the guitars on Big Star albums sound thin and a bit wimpy. And I say that as someone who finds a lot of their songs unimpeachably great as songs.

Sounds to me like they had only just discovered the in-between settings on a Strat, and were determined to use it everywhere.
 

wyclif

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Um. They are, almost by definition, world-changing. They changed the way we think about storytelling, about thinking, about the human condition. I can’t imagine what makes you suggest otherwise.

Do you think that they’re among the most-taught and studied writers in the Western world because they are trivial?

Revealing my background a little too much here, but if you want to learn how to write well by osmosis, the very best advice I can give a young writer is to read Orwell, Nabokov, and Woolf. Their prose style is top shelf.
 

aFewGoodTaters

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In the jam band genre, Phish are as relevant as the Grateful Dead. Widespread Panic possibly more so.
I understand we're talking about unpopular opinions....but I think it would be pretty tough to convince most fans of the jamband genre that Panic is more relevant that Phish. I can understand one saying they like Panic more...but relevancy? No way. Phish drew 85K to a festival in '99 where they were the only band on the bill. I don't think Panic has ever come close to numbers like that.
 

Colo Springs E

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What might be my most unpopular guitar-related opinion:

Most of the guitars on Big Star albums sound thin and a bit wimpy. And I say that as someone who finds a lot of their songs unimpeachably great as songs.

My unpopular opinion is that Big Star maybe should have allowed another band to do their songs. Because that is a band that just does nothing for me.

I'm not surprised they never found mainstream success, though many have wondered why they did not.
 

Colo Springs E

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Another unpopular opinion:

The Stones' "Love You Live" is better than "Get Yer Ya Ya's Out." Especially the El Mocambo side-- perfection.
 

Tricone

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I understand we're talking about unpopular opinions....but I think it would be pretty tough to convince most fans of the jamband genre that Panic is more relevant that Phish. I can understand one saying they like Panic more...but relevancy? No way. Phish drew 85K to a festival in '99 where they were the only band on the bill. I don't think Panic has ever come close to numbers like that.
April 18, 1998. Athens, Georgia. CD release concert for "Light Fuse, Getaway". Estimated 80-100,000 audience members. Only band on the bill.
WP also hold the record for most sold out shows at the jam band fan mecca Red Rocks at over 60 shows.
Phish has disbanded twice since starting out in 1983. 2000-2002 and 2004-2009.
WP have toured and recorded non-stop since 1986. The difference here is that WP have never lost relevancy.
 
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aFewGoodTaters

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April 18, 1998. Athens, Georgia. CD release concert for "Light Fuse, Getaway". Estimated 80-100,000 audience members. Only band on the bill.
Sure...but that was a free show. Phish's Big Cypress was a paid attendance. But we're splitting hairs I guess...and the thread is called unpopular opinions for a reason. ;)
 

GGardner

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Victor Borge didn't like him; said he wrote for babies.
I actually don't know anything about Johannes Brams. I was trying to be funny because everyone was criticizing living/contemporary folks. When I was a freshman in college, I somehow found myself at a fashionable summer party with some "beautiful people" who were discussing things that were way over my head. One was studying to be a classical musician. When the others asked him about school, he replied, "Terrible. Everyone there is like, 'Oh sure, let's play some Brahms!'" The others laughed hysterically. For some reason, his response got stuck in my head just like:

"I bet you guys don't know what kind of wood this is?" "Looks like oak to me, Henry." "Nope. Oak."

"Pork chops and applesauce."

"Don't ever take sides with anyone against the family again."

"There seems to be a mistake. Olsen's hitting the ball."

All these years later, I could be in a work meeting and a boss or colleague will suggest something utterly stupid, and everyone will say, "Excellent idea!! Just brilliant!!" And I'll say to myself, "Oh sure, let's play some Brahms."
 
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Bruxist

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I actually don't know anything about Johannes Brams. I was trying to be funny because everyone was criticizing living/contemporary folks. When I was a freshman in college, I somehow found myself at a fashionable summer party with some "beautiful people" who were discussing things that were way over my head. One was studying to be a classical musician. When the others asked him about school, he replied, "Terrible. Everyone there is like, 'Oh sure, let's play some Brahms!'" The others laughed hysterically. For some reason, his response got stuck in my head just like:

"I bet you guys don't know what kind of wood this is?" "Looks like oak to me, Henry." "Nope. Oak."

"Pork chops and applesauce."

"Don't every take sides with anyone against the family again."

"There seems to be a mistake. Olsen's hitting the ball."

All these years later, I could be in a work meeting and a boss or colleague will suggest something utterly stupid, and everyone will say, "Excellent idea!! Just brilliant!!" And I'll say to myself, "Oh sure, let's play some Brahms."

I figured it was a joke. Borge was just joking about the fact that his lullaby is Brahms' most famous piece.
 

ShortintheSleeve

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Sounds to me like they had only just discovered the in-between settings on a Strat, and were determined to use it everywhere.
Exactly. It's it not like all the uptempo songs call for real overdriven, rocking tones necessarily, but the Badfinger albums from around the same time and The Raspberries' "Go All the Way" from '72 were contemporaneous examples that power pop guitars could have solid mid-range frequencies.
 

ShortintheSleeve

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My unpopular opinion is that Big Star maybe should have allowed another band to do their songs. Because that is a band that just does nothing for me.

I'm not surprised they never found mainstream success, though many have wondered why they did not.
As a musician and Memphian going back to 2006, I considered it my musical and civic duty to listen to their discography 😄 and I enjoy a good number of their songs, but I've always been a far bigger fan of later bands who cited them as an influence--The Replacements, Wilco, and R.E.M. in particular.

In terms of song quality, I think the two records subsequent to #1 offer diminishing returns, but Third is the most interesting sonically. Outside of "Thank You, Friends," there's really nothing on that album that would sound at home on the first two. I suppose it's because by that time Alex Chilton and Jody Stephens were the only two original members left, and they recorded the songs thinking of them more as a Chilton solo record/band side project than a proper Big Star album. The highlight on that album for me is "Kanga Roo," which has strong echoes on Wilco songs like "Misunderstood," "Sunken Treasure," and "Ashes of American Flags."
 
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