Unconventional acoustic design

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Tatercaster, Feb 17, 2016.

  1. Tatercaster

    Tatercaster Friend of Leo's

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    Has anyone ever built an acoustic guitar with the top and sides carved out of a single piece of wood? The idea would be sort of like a thinline, but fully hollow.
     
  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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  3. Tony Done

    Tony Done Friend of Leo's

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    The tonal quality of an acoustic guitar depends on having the top thin and the body fairly deep, among other things, so there isn't much incentive for try to carve top and sides out of a single piece. There would also be the problem of cross-grain fragility in the sides.

    There are a fair number of string instruments in which the back and side are all one piece. - Wood charangos, for example.
     
  4. Tatercaster

    Tatercaster Friend of Leo's

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    Last edited: Feb 17, 2016
  5. Tatercaster

    Tatercaster Friend of Leo's

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    I could laminate 5" wide boards for a body blank 16" x 20" and then cut the outside shape. Then I'd hollow the middle leaving a built in X brace, neck and tail blocks. Glue on a thin wood back and bolt on a neck. I figure that the top could be cut to 3/16" or thinner on a mill or router.

    Or do a top and bottom half glued together on the centerline.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2016
  6. dazzaman

    dazzaman Tele-Afflicted

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    Orville Gibson got his patent for that at the end of the nineteenth century. I don't think he ever found it practical to do - all of the Orvilles I have seen he has cut the sides out of a single piece, along with the neck, but he was still forced to glue on a separate back.
    My suspicion is that the wood moved as he stared to carve out the waste. I have a friend who makes renaissance Citterncaster, one style of which are carved as you suggest. He said that even using maple which has been drying for twenty years he still had wood movement issues, though the original makers designed it so that when it happened (it did to them too) the wood grain would move it in the direction they wanted.
     
  7. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire

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  8. philosofriend

    philosofriend Tele-Holic

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    Orville Gibson made the sides and neck all from one piece of wood, using a bandsaw. The top and back were separate pieces. He got a patent for it. He also liked arched tops with no braces. He believed the sound would be more pure and relaxed if the wood was less stressed.
     
  9. Zepfan

    Zepfan Poster Extraordinaire

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    Those are awesome, thanks for that.
     
  10. italo

    italo Tele-Meister

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    I have seen the opposite: Back and sides carved from one piece and a standard top, made by a local luthier.. I saw nothing special besides the fact the rarity of owning such a special constructed instrument. Cheers
     
  11. BAAnderson

    BAAnderson TDPRI Member

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    Hey!

    I've recently thought of trying to do something along the same lines, kind of like KOZM's guitars. The top and back would be .5" thick and then carve the 'insides' to give the proper thickness as well as leaving all the braces carved in. I'd use a CNC so once I figured out the proper physics I think they'd be pretty easy to make. Right now just an idea, but will see. Looking to see what others have to say/have done!
     
  12. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire

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    I've been kicking the same idea around for a while now . Also the idea of a hardtail bridge like his one model is very intriguing .
     
  13. Tatercaster

    Tatercaster Friend of Leo's

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    The thing I like about this design is that it could be easily constructed with a router using whatever type of wood you can obtain, then bolt on a Strat or Tele neck. Use a 1/2 ashtray Tele bridge that top loads. Should be fun!
     
  14. bsman

    bsman Tele-Afflicted

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    While my Emerald is admittedly not wood, it IS made out of one piece of carbon fiber. There is no seam between neck and body, or the back and top -- all one piece.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. rowka

    rowka Tele-Meister

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