Two hundred fifty-sixth notes

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by mrboson, Nov 12, 2013.

  1. mrboson

    mrboson Tele-Afflicted

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    Last year there was a post, I forget by who (sorry, I supposed I could have searched to give credit), that labeled notes up to 64ths (hemidemisemiquaver).

    So the next (128th) would be a semihemidemisemiquaver. I guess those are the British names.

    But no British name for the hundred fifty-sixth note? I looked it up and it seems Mozart used that one, so we can use the German name: zweihundertsechsundfünfzigstelnote.

    I don't really have a point to this post. Maybe examples of even smaller durations?
     
  2. jefrs

    jefrs Doctor of Teleocity

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    One thing with old music, at one time the semibreve had the duration of the breve i.e. it and all the smaller notes were twice as long. They crammed a lot of very little notes into very slow music. So 80bpm becomes 40bpm, but they played things like pavannes even slower, 10bpm or 20bpm, a bar took a long time to get through. The beat may have been slow but there were plenty of fiddly bits to do.

    Do we not simply start the name again at the beginning?
    hemidemisemihemidemisemiquaver
     
  3. Del Pickup

    Del Pickup Poster Extraordinaire

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    I can't play 256 notes in a whole song far less have a need to name them - although I tend to play so few notes I could probably be on first name terms with them all if I wanted to!!
     
  4. stevieboy

    stevieboy Poster Extraordinaire

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    I can play 256th notes. As long as the song is 2BPM or less.
     
  5. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    Yeah, it's weird that shorter values are used in slow music, and longer values in fast music. As a composer, I don't think I've used anything shorter than 64th notes. With American musicians, I generally don't find anyone using quaver-type terminology, while Brits use it a lot (when discussing Classical music).
     
  6. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    256th note? Dudes back then could shred!

    [​IMG]
     
  7. jefrs

    jefrs Doctor of Teleocity

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    We get taught the minim, quaver and so on but half-note, quarter-note is easier and makes more sense. Apart from being able to roll "hemidemisemiquaver" off the tongue to impress normals, I'm more than happy to use the "American", or is it German;) method.

    What I cannot get my head around is the French method of using the tonic sol-fah (doh ray me) instead of note names.
     
  8. jefrs

    jefrs Doctor of Teleocity

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    You may well find five or six ticks on the tail of a note in an Elizabethan pavanne. Even remembering that they are now twice the duration written, and at a very slow bpm, yes they were indeed shredding. On a lute.
     
  9. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    Oh yeah. In our sight-singing courses, we use movable do, where do is the tonic of whatever key we are in. French solfege, as with some other countries, is fixed do, where do is C, whether it is the tonic or not. That doesn't make sense to me if you are trying to teach/learn how to sing using scale degrees.
     
  10. stevieboy

    stevieboy Poster Extraordinaire

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    Fixed or not, I assume the use of do ray me instead of note names is because people actually sing those syllables in exercises, and it's better to have different vowel sounds in that context. Imagine singing A B C D E F G over and over, all but A and F are the same sound. Add to that sharps and flats--how would you deal with that in singing exercises?
     
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