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Twin Thinline Double Bound Telemasters - Build Thread

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by telechadster, Mar 16, 2014.

  1. Demina

    Demina TDPRI Member

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    These look great! I'm wanting to do a Thinline Jaguar this summer. One question, when routing the chambers, how thick do you leave the back?
     
  2. telechadster

    telechadster Tele-Meister

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    Thanks Demina its been super fun so far (even the mess ups).
    Typically the back is left at .25 inches, same as the top. I left a hair thicker to be safe.
    Cheers!
     
  3. preeb

    preeb Poster Extraordinaire Vendor Member

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    Good clean job!
     
  4. Holyoli

    Holyoli Tele-Meister

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    Nice build ! Congrats
     
  5. telechadster

    telechadster Tele-Meister

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    Thank you Gil, that means a lot especially considering how much I learned from your build threads!!

    Cheers!
     
  6. telechadster

    telechadster Tele-Meister

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    Thanks Holyoli!!
     
  7. jadedsoul

    jadedsoul Tele-Holic

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    Fantastico reading, may i commend your on your typing skills as well. That read like a book ;) Some nice smooth looking work done there, some good fixes. It nice to see somebody invest a whole load of money into somthing they love doing. all your stuff is brand new. i had to build mine with a jigsaw a router and some odd and ends.. And scrap wood. My next one im aiming to use some more tools and nice wood. Look forward to the rest.
     
  8. telechadster

    telechadster Tele-Meister

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    HaHa, thanks jadesoul!
    Luckily since it took me about a year to get the tools and get this far, the financial pain was dulled a bit ;)
    At one point I had thought about selling one of them to offload the costs, but I think I may give one to each of my kids (12 and 3). The younger one's I'll have to break in for him until he's old enough :cool:
    Cheers!
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2014
  9. Mongo Park

    Mongo Park Tele-Afflicted

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    Really enjoying your build, love the thinline.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. telechadster

    telechadster Tele-Meister

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    Thanks! Yours is sweet, I love the offset f-holes and controls locations....
    Cheer!
     
  11. telechadster

    telechadster Tele-Meister

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    Neck Time

    Alright, had a chance to move onto the neck, not quite as far along as I'd hoped, but making progress.

    First I had to figure out my jig situation, I had to plane my blanks and also build a truss rod jig, so I combined them into one. I took the same approach as my router sled, but narrower to work for a neck.

    I started with 2 lengths of oak, use a rabbeting router bit to create rails along the top edges. The idea was to use my plexi router base along the top edge, and my router sled base to slide along the recessed rails edge.
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    I used a pocket hole Kreggs jig to screw the sides into the base, and like my first router sled, I had to remove some minor bow in the oak.
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    One again I had to put some risers in, but this helped to stabilize the side rails so worked out good.
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    Left enough room on either side to not have to worry about getting too close with the router since this time I'll be using a free floating sled (my plexi base).
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  12. telechadster

    telechadster Tele-Meister

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    Since my blanks were bowed and cupped, I was worried that I wouldn't have enough thickness to flatten them out, so I went cautiously and lined up the router bit only to the lowest point on the wood, I took off a very small amount, so I only needed one pass per side.
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    Once I did both sides I measured and had a hair over 3/4" (whew!!). Just enough room to sand, which I will need to do since this time I didn't get as smooth of a result as with my body blanks, there was minor seams where each pass overlaps.
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  13. telechadster

    telechadster Tele-Meister

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    Next I had to figure out the best way to route my truss rod channel. I put my router on the rails to make sure my center line was true on both my sled risers and also once I lined up my blank to that. Once I got that sorted out I needed to figure out the best way to stop the router at the right spot. I tested out using clamps, which might have worked but had too much play and didn't fill me with confidence that they wouldn't slip.
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    I had played with the idea of cross braces which would act as bumpers, but I didn't want something I would have to screw in and out each time I went from router sled to truss rod channel, so decided to use some of my brass rod and create pins which would give me a solid stop and a consistent route length.
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  14. telechadster

    telechadster Tele-Meister

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    With that done I took it for its first pass.
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    I may have gone a bit too deep on the first pass, but overall it went well aside from my plunge router plunging to depth very abruptly which kind of made me jump (the plunge bass needs some adjusting, not really a very smooth plunge...).
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    I did three depth passes in total, and then it was time for a test fit.
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    Depth wise was great, length just a hair short so I put a very small notch in my sled base where it contacts the pin to get about another 1/16".
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    Did the second and we were good to go.
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    I was a hair off center on the first one, so I adjusted my center line and outline on my blanks, and then they were ready to rough cut.
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  15. telechadster

    telechadster Tele-Meister

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    Stayed as close to the line as I felt comfortable with my not very well calibrated band saw.
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    Left a bit of room, but then it was time for sanding
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    I took the rest down as close to the edge as I could, knowing that routing the curves on the neck could be tricky.
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  16. telechadster

    telechadster Tele-Meister

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    Next I double sided taped on the template. I think I used way too much because getting it off was tough and left so much glue goo that it took me a while to get it off of the neck and my hands when I was done.
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    Next was routing, I knew and read so many posts about tear outs at the headstock and knew I should have just sanded it, but not having done it before I was determined to do it with my router. I took super small bites and things went relatively well until the inevitable happened. I got a small tear out at the top of the headstock. I'm pretty amazed at how fast it happened, it didn't catch or jump or anything, just a small chunk of wood disappeared.
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    At this point I was somewhat caught up in the moment and didn't actually get a picture of the raw tear out, but luckily it was shallow enough that it barely went into the wood inside of the template. I was able to sand most of it out and without too much more than a bit more rounding to the top corner than typical and so I simply took my template and moved the top curve in a bit to allow me to sand a sharper corner back. I also had a minor divot from a router tip, but the most of it is in the neck carve area, so it shouldn't be a problem.
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    I also too my chances on the heel, going with even smaller bits and really just carving out small sections as a time. Aside from a bit of burn, it went well with no tearouts.
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    I finished the first one a bit frazzled by some of the things I learned...first and foremost I need a router table. The neck is just way too skinny to confidently balance a router on it, especially at the ends. But all in all minor issues aside, its a decent first attempt and not a throw away so I'm happy.
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  17. telechadster

    telechadster Tele-Meister

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    For the second things go without any issues, I go much more cautiously around the curves and leave the tip of the headstock to do on the ross.
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    And soon enough I have 2 necks ready for a fretboard.
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    I go back and do some finish sanding on my first one to take care of the issues, the tearout isn't completely gone, but pretty close and I may still sand a bit further to get the last bit taken care of, but its pretty minor so I'm going to wait a bit and see how I feel once the fret board is on. And the divot from the router dip is also smoothed flat where it will meet the fretboard so one I carve the neck it should be gone completely.
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    Thats it for now, had hoped to start cutting the frets, but didn't quite make it there yet, but hopefully soon.

    Cheers!!
     
  18. gemktm

    gemktm Tele-Meister

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    Boy... you are doing one heck of a job. Thanks soooo much for the inspiration!
     
  19. telechadster

    telechadster Tele-Meister

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    Made some progress this weekend, and also got a nice package from my snowbird supply mules who came back from Arizona with a nice shipment of Reranch.
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    So now that I had my necks ready for fretboards, I had a couple things to do, drill the truss rod access hole and cut my fret slots. First though I had to figure out that even though Stewmac doesn't mention it, even the 4mm hex key truss rods will need a slightly larger slot at the end of the truss rod channel, so I had to sort of freehand it so I could get the nut of end of the truss rod through the channel and into the hole.

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    Took me a couple of tries to get it nice and clean, but ended up with a good fit on both.
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    Next, not wanting to chance it by hand drilling like some with a much steadier hand than me, I clamped each neck to my drill press and used a level to make sure I drilled straight.
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    Nice fit!
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    Next one:
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    And done:
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    Last edited: Apr 7, 2014
  20. telechadster

    telechadster Tele-Meister

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    Next up was sawing the frets.
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    Double sided taped onto the slot template lining up the center lines
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    And started sawing:
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    Started with a test cut to gauge the depth I would need:
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    And moved onto the rest. The one thing about the stewmac miter box, its really great once you get it set up, but the set up requires loosening a series of bolts for each component with gets a bit tedious trying to make sure everything is the same. But one you get it its pretty good at making the job easy.
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    And soon enough
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    And now I have lots of rosewood dust for filling in any fret slots gaps if there are any.
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    Last edited: Apr 7, 2014
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