Twin Reverb Questions.

wildcatter

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Welcome 😄🤗!

I went from a Crate when they were still made in orange crates to a non master Twin.

Everybody should own a Twin at least once. You'll understand everything once you here the bloom from an open chord.

Rest assured you are destined to annoy someone with it.
Oh Yeah... Or FEEL the air that one of those babies pushes at it's peak volume. If someone doesn't "get" the difference between a real tube amp and a solid state...
And "annoy someone? more like break their windows if you crank the thing to full...
They are notoriously "clean" all the way up till the speakers hit the break-up/natural distortion of the amp. Usually well about literally deafening levels, especially if used frequently for gigging or session work.
 

Bourbon Burst

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I found a 74’ master volume (silver face twins can be found for great prices) and had it completely gone over by the best amp Dr. I could find. It is sweet at any volume- very full and completely flexible in how you want to use it. Very heavy- mine stays parked. You can do several things to get tone a lower volumes like speaker changes, pull one set of power tubes, put a less aggressive tube in position 1, etc. I love my silver face twin
I recently bought a 75 TR. It is the tech right now getting the caps replaced and a new grounded power chord.

People talk about the weight but it is no worse than lugging a 4x12 cab for my Marshall. My Telecaster sounded as beautiful as a piano with that amp. I can't wait to get it back.
 

RobinsonCustoms

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Hi, I'm here to ask for your guidance please.

I'm making the transition from digital to analog and am very focused on buying a tube amp, mainly because I've been told it feels warmer and more dynamic than transistors.

I'm a big fan of a Japanese band called Ling tosite sigure and the guitarist is known for using a Fender Twin Reverb in conjunction with his pedalboard to achieve a crystal clear, defined, clear, crisp and distorted tone.

My problem is that I need an amp to rehearse in a relatively small venue and play medium venues. So I've read that the Fender Twin Reverb is incredibly loud even when set to 1-2 (I don't know about this, but I was thinking of leaving it at 3).

An important fact is that I'm not looking to saturate the tubes, I just want that dynamic and harmonically rich tone of the Twin reverb to accompany it with my telecaster and my pedalboard that has everything I need in terms of overdrives, distortions and modulations.
The truth is that I am very obsessed with the twin reverb but I am concerned about that issue and that there are other options.

I attach a video of the guitarist I mention:






You can never go wrong with Fender, but I'd ask that you look at a couple other options, all tube, just a little different. Vox AC-10 or even an Orange Rocker 32, or 20RT. All of which I have, but if you REALLY want to do it right - get a Carr Mercury V or similar, you'll never plug in any other amp for any reason at all. You can take the Carr down to whispering levels and still keep the growl you desire, or blow the friggin doors off if so inclined. Plug in a Jazzmaster Ultra or American Pro II and the variety of tones you'll have available are endless. And yes, I have a GAS problem...
 

Vibroluxer

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You can never go wrong with Fender, but I'd ask that you look at a couple other options, all tube, just a little different. Vox AC-10 or even an Orange Rocker 32, or 20RT. All of which I have, but if you REALLY want to do it right - get a Carr Mercury V or similar, you'll never plug in any other amp for any reason at all. You can take the Carr down to whispering levels and still keep the growl you desire, or blow the friggin doors off if so inclined. Plug in a Jazzmaster Ultra or American Pro II and the variety of tones you'll have available are endless. And yes, I have a GAS problem...

I think you need a Twin!! You mention some nice amps but none of those are remotely in the territory of a Twin

😄😎
 

Captdan61

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A Twin "can" be incredibly loud, it has a volume knob and sounds awesome at any volume actually. The Twin makes a great low volume amp imo, it fills the room with a very thick, three dimensional sound, unlike a boxy, directional little amp.
Go get one, you will not be disappointed 😉
And while your at it get yourself a back brace or a GOOD hand truck! Or both…
 

Wildeman

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And while your at it get yourself a back brace or a GOOD hand truck! Or both…
Well, there's always a give and take. I love the comfort and power of my F150, I pay for that at the pump😉
And, I can haul a bunch of Twins
 
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alexamadrid

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That's the settings for "icepick". Use your ears and dial in what sounds good to you.

Putting a Twin or Super Reverb at 6 on the volume is ridiculous for 90% of us anyway, unless we are playing an outside gig or something.
The wide array of knobs, switches, levers and what not on every electric guitar I've ever owned may be confusingly daunting at first glance, however, I've discovered something to overcome the bewilderment: First, locate the knob(s) labelled with the letter "V", "VOL, or maybe even "VOLUME". Then, merely rotate counterclockwise until the amp volume is no longer "ridiculous". Tame "icepick" with the little knob labelled "T", or perhaps even "TONE". Use your ears and dial in what sounds good to you.
 
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24 track

Telefied
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1.165 / 5.000
Hi, I'm here to ask for your guidance please.

I'm making the transition from digital to analog and am very focused on buying a tube amp, mainly because I've been told it feels warmer and more dynamic than transistors.

I'm a big fan of a Japanese band called Ling tosite sigure and the guitarist is known for using a Fender Twin Reverb in conjunction with his pedalboard to achieve a crystal clear, defined, clear, crisp and distorted tone.

My problem is that I need an amp to rehearse in a relatively small venue and play medium venues. So I've read that the Fender Twin Reverb is incredibly loud even when set to 1-2 (I don't know about this, but I was thinking of leaving it at 3).

An important fact is that I'm not looking to saturate the tubes, I just want that dynamic and harmonically rich tone of the Twin reverb to accompany it with my telecaster and my pedalboard that has everything I need in terms of overdrives, distortions and modulations.
The truth is that I am very obsessed with the twin reverb but I am concerned about that issue and that there are other options.

I attach a video of the guitarist I mention:






Make sure you get the correct twin there are a few models
Mine is a 65 Black face Re-issue = 85 watts loud , but contollable , I have worked on some of these that were not manufactured very well , I lucked out I have none of the issues with mine
Super twin = 100+ watts weighs a ton, very loud , I've fixed them but never gigged them
The twin I believe a solid state version , again never played one

My point is to do some home work and try some out to see if you connect with them , or more over does it connect with you.
nice sounding amps , New amps come with Chinese tubes , I swapped them out with GT 6L6's and 12Ax7, also I re capped mine with F&T caps higher quality than the stock I/C caps , made the the amp dead quiet even at loud volumes.
 

myfenderissues

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houston
1.165 / 5.000
Hi, I'm here to ask for your guidance please.

I'm making the transition from digital to analog and am very focused on buying a tube amp, mainly because I've been told it feels warmer and more dynamic than transistors.

I'm a big fan of a Japanese band called Ling tosite sigure and the guitarist is known for using a Fender Twin Reverb in conjunction with his pedalboard to achieve a crystal clear, defined, clear, crisp and distorted tone.

My problem is that I need an amp to rehearse in a relatively small venue and play medium venues. So I've read that the Fender Twin Reverb is incredibly loud even when set to 1-2 (I don't know about this, but I was thinking of leaving it at 3).

An important fact is that I'm not looking to saturate the tubes, I just want that dynamic and harmonically rich tone of the Twin reverb to accompany it with my telecaster and my pedalboard that has everything I need in terms of overdrives, distortions and modulations.
The truth is that I am very obsessed with the twin reverb but I am concerned about that issue and that there are other options.

I attach a video of the guitarist I mention:






i don't know what you are talking about. a twin can be played at low and moderate volume like any other amplifier. the main compliant you hear about a twin is it weights around 70 lbs. as for 80 watts, remove two output tubes and then it's a 40 watt amp.
 

stnmtthw

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Apr 2, 2012
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New Mexico
The wide array of knobs, switches, levers and what not on every electric guitar I've ever owned may be confusingly daunting at first glance, however, I've discovered something to overcome the bewilderment: First, locate the knob(s) labelled with the letter "V", "VOL, or maybe even "VOLUME". Then, merely rotate counterclockwise until the amp volume is no longer "ridiculous". Tame "icepick" with the little knob labelled "T", or perhaps even "TONE". Use your ears and dial in what sounds good to you.
If it sounds good to you, it is good, my friend. All I'm saying is, to me, the "magic 6" ain't magic at all.
 

Wildeman

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Location
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The wide array of knobs, switches, levers and what not on every electric guitar I've ever owned may be confusingly daunting at first glance, however, I've discovered something to overcome the bewilderment: First, locate the knob(s) labelled with the letter "V", "VOL, or maybe even "VOLUME". Then, merely rotate counterclockwise until the amp volume is no longer "ridiculous". Tame "icepick" with the little knob labelled "T", or perhaps even "TONE". Use your ears and dial in what sounds good to you.
😁👍
 

Refugee

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Get a mid 70's silver face with a Master Volume control. You don't need an attenuator. You can get great sounds at bedroom volume with the Master Volume.
 

Edgar Allan Presley

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Jan 24, 2011
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I had a really special 1970 Twin Reverb that I gigged with for several years. It was a great amp, but I definitely preferred its sound played loud enough to compress a bit. Low settings just weren't as good. I used a compressor pedal set low to be a compromise when I couldn't turn it up. I also played it sometimes with the outer power tubes removed and one speaker disconnected and that worked ok.

Try one. They're great amps.
 

ETMusic777

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California
A couple months ago, I saw a 1975 Fender Super Twin, 135W on Craigslist, for sale at a pawn shop in a not so great part of LA but for only $300. I drove up there and checked it out. It was all original but a bit beat up and dirty. I plugged in to it and the store, hit a chord "wrraaaannnnggg" and there it was...that legendary gorgeous, open clean Fender tone. No offense to the Tone Masters which are good approximations, but there ain't nothin' like the real thing as Marvin and Tammy sang. I ended up passing on it because I don't need another amp, and it needed a bit of cosmetic work done to it, but for $300 it was a good deal. I could have gotten it for $250 cash on the spot but I passed.
 

Maguchi

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Lalaland
If you can afford it, look in to getting a Fryette Attenuator, as its the only "attenuator" which really does not affect the tone, as far as I have heard...
^^^ I can't disagree, they're top of the line. But OUCH! $700-$1000.
 




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