Twin Reverb or Super Reverb Reissue?

funkyguitarman

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For about the past decade or so I have used a Twin Reverb Reissue in nearly every band. From outdoor festivals to jazz combo gigs at a dining out, the Twin allowed me to tailor my tones for specific gigs with pedals. This setup was very basic but very effective which is why I played it for so long. Towards the end of my Army music career, I switched over to a Vox AC30 and Mesa Boogie Express+ 5:50 1X12 because they were available and variety it nice, especially those two amps. Despite being a long time user of Fender amps, I have never really delved into other models like the Deluxe, Super, Princeton, and so forth. One of the reasons I didn't budge from the Twin Reverb all those years was I could only afford one amp and needed it to cover all my bases. Currently I'm very fortunate and grateful to own to wonderful amps. I still have my Twin Reverb for all my blues, country, and jazz sounds and my Marshall stack for those pure rock moments.

So here I ask anyone who has played both their thoughts on how they differ. I understand the technical differences but would love to hear individual experiences or impressions. I still very much enjoy my Twin Reverb and get a lot of home and gig use out of it. My main reason for looking at a Super is that I noticed a lot of players I really enjoy seem to favor the 4X10 speaker configuration and less wattage of a Super. I have neither the space nor the desire to own more than two amps. Is there a noticeable volume difference between these two amps?

Thanks in advance.
 

Chiogtr4x

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I'd say play one, and see (hear) if you like it.

I come from playing in a ( former, now I go really small) blues band R&R band, where Deluxe Reverbs ( what I owned) or Vibrolux Reverbs were the norm, '59 Bassman RI's too.
Super Reverbs were to me, the Holy Grail 'big amp' to me- and honestly because I love the way they look- the height, mobility w/wheels, plus plenty of power for me.

Too big for me now ( all small gigs, bad back, apartment), and expensive ( for me) but my friends have Supers, and I love enjoy playing them - SG into a Super is amazing!

From just an aesthetic perspective, vs. a Twin, a Super Reverb is breath taking!
640486-15f5f2ace5d3c888da697116e91711ce.jpg
640484-0f5cc855e825b1a47cce81111a81aa75.jpg
 

twangjeff

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So these are just MY opinions, so by all means take them for that.

I have owned 3 Super Reverbs, a 67, a 71, and a Reissue.

The Reissue is probably the worst, 'Pro,' amp that I ever owned. Now I got one right when they first came out, maybe they've changed things since then... the Clean sound up to about 3.5 on the volume was good, but once it started to break up, it was really unnatural and fizzy. This amp was also a lot brighter than my other Supers which made taking pedals almost a non-starter. I tried to make it work for about 6 months, and sold it on. I think that the Twin Reissue and DR Reissue are much better.

The 67, and 71 were great amps. The amount of breakup with the volume control would take you from a great and fat clean sound at low volumes, perfect mid gain breakup in the sweet spot, and almost to Robben Ford Territory with humbuckers.

The thing to keep in mind with these amps is that they are big and loud, but very directional on stage. The amp can blow your head off, and you take one step to the left and you can't hear it (In a band context of course). I think that this, coupled with the size and trend towards smaller amps, has made prices on these things get to really reasonable levels. When I sold my 71 I got $1400 for it, and I felt pretty lucky bc I thought it would never sell. Who would have thought that Princeton Reverbs would be selling for more than Super Reverbs? But... PR is a more usable amp I suppose...
 

funkyguitarman

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I'd say play one, and see (hear) if you like it.

I come from playing in a ( former, now I go really small) blues band R&R band, where Deluxe Reverbs ( what I owned) or Vibrolux Reverbs were the norm, '59 Bassman RI's too.
Super Reverbs were to me, the Holy Grail 'big amp' to me- and honestly because I love the way they look- the height, mobility w/wheels, plus plenty of power for me.

Too big for me now ( all small gigs, bad back, apartment), and expensive ( for me) but my friends have Supers, and I love enjoy playing them - SG into a Super is amazing!

From just an aesthetic perspective, vs. a Twin, a Super Reverb is breath taking!
View attachment 925678 View attachment 925677

They are certainly easy on the eyes.
 

funkyguitarman

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So these are just MY opinions, so by all means take them for that.

I have owned 3 Super Reverbs, a 67, a 71, and a Reissue.

The Reissue is probably the worst, 'Pro,' amp that I ever owned. Now I got one right when they first came out, maybe they've changed things since then... the Clean sound up to about 3.5 on the volume was good, but once it started to break up, it was really unnatural and fizzy. This amp was also a lot brighter than my other Supers which made taking pedals almost a non-starter. I tried to make it work for about 6 months, and sold it on. I think that the Twin Reissue and DR Reissue are much better.

The 67, and 71 were great amps. The amount of breakup with the volume control would take you from a great and fat clean sound at low volumes, perfect mid gain breakup in the sweet spot, and almost to Robben Ford Territory with humbuckers.

The thing to keep in mind with these amps is that they are big and loud, but very directional on stage. The amp can blow your head off, and you take one step to the left and you can't hear it (In a band context of course). I think that this, coupled with the size and trend towards smaller amps, has made prices on these things get to really reasonable levels. When I sold my 71 I got $1400 for it, and I felt pretty lucky bc I thought it would never sell. Who would have thought that Princeton Reverbs would be selling for more than Super Reverbs? But... PR is a more usable amp I suppose...

Thats interesting, what year was the reissue?
 

Chiogtr4x

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They are certainly easy on the eyes.

Quick story:
The first time I ever heard these two iconic pieces of gear ( maybe the only time with these 2, together) was 1992,
I just joined into a Chicago-style blues band ( DC-area) and we shared a bar gig with our bass player's brother's R&R band ( covers and good originals) in Baltimore.

Bob played a 1957 Les Paul Jr. straight into a '67 Super Reverb (unlike me, he does NOT use pedals!) and the sound was just amazing
Getting that huge Socal Distortion 'Country grind' along with an overdriven Chuck Berry-style boogie /double stops. That combination was just Giant!

( I had the 'blues uniform ' a Strat> Tube Screamer > '67 Pro Reverb, which sounded very good, but just not as live/ Natural as that JR straight into the Super!)
 

bebopbrain

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Consider the source! But you asked, so here goes.

Get a 4x10 , install your favorite type of speakers, and play your Twin through the 4x10. If you love it, you can always get a Bandmaster Reverb head, which is the same thing. Or, heaven forbid, chop the twin.

For the 4x10, get a PA column type speaker arrangement where the speakers are vertical. Old, funny looking Peavey PA towers work with adaptation. Vertical arrays spread sound better. And the tower is convenient for holding drinks or, around the house, a favorite objet.
 

jrblue

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Some players create magic with a SR, but my experience with them has been super-negative. I've hardly ever needed the extreme volume level that those amps were designed to deliver, and which is the level at which they sing beautifully. If I played in a big bar with no PA for amps, or on outdoor stages -- which is why those amps exist -- I would be a happy owner. But -- true story -- I get a headache when anyone says "Super Reverb" from having my brain drilled out having to play in front of one of those time and again in clubs back when you actually needed to volume. I love 10" speakers -- all my most-used amps have 10s -- but not aimed at your head and screaming their a$$e$ off. At least a Twin sits on the floor. In the right situation a Super is, well, Super, but IMO it is a genuinely useless (or worse) amp 90% of the time today. I don't use reissues because they're not reissues. They're crappier rough copies.
 

schmee

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Nothing beats a Super to me. The 4 x 10 is the magic. Punchy and it's like the sound has another dimension when you A / B it with another single speaker amp.
Part of the joy is the light duty speakers. I once put heavy robust speakers (Weber 10F150's) in a Super and it sounded great, but loud and it lost some magic.
 

archetype

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A Super with a pedal is the recipe for big and fat at tolerable volumes. For example, Ana Popovic and Tommy Castro each play a 60s Strat through a Tube Screamer into a black panel Super Reverb. They each get a wide range of tone from clean to saturated and midrangy.
 

fretWalkr

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I've had 3 SRs and they were all great amps. I tried others but the 4x10 configuration is the one that sounds the best to me. Twins are good amps but the 2x12 is one of my least favorite speaker configs.

I never bothered with Fenders without a middle control. They're good amps but guitar lives in the midrange and I like having that flexibility a middle gives you.
 

Lawdawg

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Limited experience with a Super, but to my ears a Super Reverb has a more assertive tone than a Twin. SRs do this thing where every frequency leaps out at you from the amp, it's simultaneously clean and aggressive -- it vaguely reminds me of a Hiwatt in that way. It could be that the extra punchiness is due more to the 4x10 speaker configuration, I don't really know.

While Twins can certainly be punishingly loud, I think they have a more forgiving tone than the Super. I think a Twin will also be the more versatile amp as well. I've played a Twin for 25 years and while I've been tempted to pick up a Super for variety, I ultimately prefer the Twin's version of big Fender cleans.

There's really not much volume difference between a Super and a Twin -- the Super will break up earlier -- but these are both big clean high volume amps.

I'd be super curious to hear how a Super and Twin sound played through the same 4x10 cab -- if anyone has tried this please let me know!
 

Axis29

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Consider the source! But you asked, so here goes.

Get a 4x10 , install your favorite type of speakers, and play your Twin through the 4x10. If you love it, you can always get a Bandmaster Reverb head, which is the same thing. Or, heaven forbid, chop the twin.

For the 4x10, get a PA column type speaker arrangement where the speakers are vertical. Old, funny looking Peavey PA towers work with adaptation. Vertical arrays spread sound better. And the tower is convenient for holding drinks or, around the house, a favorite objet.

The Bandmaster Reverb being the equivalent of the Super Reverb? Isn't the Dual Showman is the same as the Twin Reverb, in head form.
 

adjason

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There is not that much difference to my ears- they are in the same ballpark. I've got a 67 super and have had about 4-5 70's twins (and I like the reissue). I think a twin reverb is my favorite fender amp and I would rather move a twin than a super. If I were you I would look at something a bit smaller or lighter and keep the twin- deluxe reverb or Princeton reverb or the newer 40 watt Pro reverb. Now if a super pops up cheap on craigslist I would go check it out but there is not that much difference
 

Chiogtr4x

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A Super with a pedal is the recipe for big and fat at tolerable volumes. For example, Ana Popovic and Tommy Castro each play a 60s Strat through a Tube Screamer into a black panel Super Reverb. They each get a wide range of tone from clean to saturated and midrangy.

Dave Alvin from The Blasters days, got a great sound with his Super Reverb
 

JustABluesGuy

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Consider the source! But you asked, so here goes.

Get a 4x10 , install your favorite type of speakers, and play your Twin through the 4x10. If you love it, you can always get a Bandmaster Reverb head, which is the same thing. Or, heaven forbid, chop the twin.

For the 4x10, get a PA column type speaker arrangement where the speakers are vertical. Old, funny looking Peavey PA towers work with adaptation. Vertical arrays spread sound better. And the tower is convenient for holding drinks or, around the house, a favorite objet.

I got lucky and found a pair of vintage vertical 2X10 PA cabs with CTS drivers at a nearby pawnshop for $50 for the pair!

One alone sounds very good. Placed side by side, they offer a 4x10 sound in a much easier to handle form factor.
 




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