Tweed Adhesive and Fabric for an Old Bassman

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by Intubator, Oct 17, 2019.

  1. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    When I did my '58 Twin, I used the fabric from Angela Instruments. The stripe is slightly olive, and the fabric is a touch thicker than the stuff Fender used back in the day. But, in the end, I am perfectly happy with it. It wasn't going on an original cabinet, but one I built myself, following as many little details as I could, form what was left of my cabinet (It had been damaged and cut down to a head long before I acquired it).

    I was really afraid of the tweed application process. But, in the end it was much easier than I anticipated and I actually got to truly enjoy doing it. I am actually looking forward to the next amp. Granted, I also used 3M 77 spray adhesive. But, I didn't have anything to heat up hide glue at the time. Nor, was I willing to buy all the items I would need (I was getting ready for across country move and trying to pare down).

    There's a video somewhere on Youtube of a guy using hide glue and a glue spreading roller machine. That's gotta be a lot easier than a brush to spread the hide glue. But, if you're familiar with HG, I say go for it! I would like to try it.


    I will admit... I am going to start looking for twill fabrics to see if i can find something closer...
     
  2. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire

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    This is the best contact cement I've ever used not just on Tolex. Screen Shot 2019-10-18 at 6.07.26 AM.png not cheap, Not sure if it's available in smaller cans.
     
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  3. BobbyZ

    BobbyZ Doctor of Teleocity

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    I used Tight Bond II for tweed. Not saying it's the best ! Just what I use.
    My method is a plastic bondo spreader to put a coat on the wood. Then I slap a coat on the tweed, let it get pretty much dry and put it on. Follow that up with a hot iron.
    Nice thing is no nasty fumes. Probably not authentic but if I had a real tweed I'd do it that why for myself.
    Tolex I'm still doing with solvent contact cement. Haven't had much luck with toxic spray glues or nontoxic glues on tolex. If I could iron tolex I'd try the Tight Bond.
     
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  4. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Bobby, iirc, my friend at one time was ironing tolex with a protective layer of cloth between the iron and the tolex???
     
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  5. Intubator

    Intubator Tele-Meister

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    Thanks SacDave, that stuff is intriguing and I may end up using it... The website says nothing smaller than a gallon can be had. Seems like a super charged version of elmers or some hide glue. So, have you actually used it on tweed?
     
  6. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire

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    Not on tweed Used it on Tolex and a lot of plastic laminate. what ever you buy do a test I was using oil base on telex worked great another piece from deferent supplier melted. What do the tweed suppliers suggest? A lot of adhesive's will stick the covering to the cab but the problem getting it to hold on the overlaps.
     
  7. saltyseadog

    saltyseadog Tele-Meister

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    When I was doing my tweed covered pine cab which I finished around 6mths ago I researched everything I could on what to use for adhesive. A lot of people using glues were having problems from bleedthrough changing the colour to corners not sticking etc. I also came across a set of videos on You Tube of an Australian using industrial strength double sided tape. Now I had worked in a garage where we used this for certain upholstery jobs and knew how seriously strong it was. My only worry was that applying the water like shellac might have an effect by going through the tweed cloth. In the end I decided to go that way anyway and six months later that tweed is as solid fixed as ever. I admit I had apprehensions but am glad I went with the double sided tape in the end as it gave me more time to get everything right with the nips and tucks on the corners etc.
     
  8. rolandson

    rolandson Tele-Meister

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    Know a guy. Has a 1957 3-10 Bandmaster. The tweed is trash.
    His spouse hated it in his living room because it looks like it's infested with rats.

    He talked about recovering it.
    I talked him out of that.

    Talked him into moving the innards to a new tweed cab and preserving the ratty original as the ratty original it's supposed to be.

    Cost him less than the retweeding was going to cost.
    His spouse's upholstery friend hates me. I don't care.
     
  9. The Ballzz

    The Ballzz Tele-Afflicted

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    @Intubator & All,
    The pics in post #12 provide a graphically comparative example of the dramatic differences of original vs modern fabric. Thanks for those pics! While I like the look of the modern stuff "OK" there is certainly no mistaking it for the real deal!
    Just My $.02 & Probably Worth A Whole Lot Less!
    Gene
     
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  10. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    [​IMG]

    Here's the cab I did with the stuff from Angela. As you can see, the overlaps are thick, but there's nothing you can do... The stuff you get now is just thicker. Although, it isn't as obvious in person. I think we;'re seeing a bit of shadow from the lighting here. emphasizing it.

    I keep hoping someone will come out with something more vintage correct, but it is what it is. Be nice to find some honest to goodness twill fabric that's thinner and more accurate. If anybody finds some, share away... please!
     
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  11. CigBurn

    CigBurn TDPRI Member

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    Don't shoot me..

    A few years ago I built and birch cab and covered it in tweed from Angela Instruments. Since it was a replacement cab for an old 25R with a Ragin Cajun in it, going super traditional wasn't really part of the plan. So I used a 4" putty knife and a sponge for the odd to get to bits and applied Tec Type 1 Mastic. It gave me plenty of working time, was not messy and didn't soak through. Best of all it dried perfectly and held until the day someone stole the amp out of my car.

    Image16.jpg
     
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  12. BobbyZ

    BobbyZ Doctor of Teleocity

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    A new cab is often the best option. For one thing it's faster, (even for wood butcher like me) to build a cab than it is to properly prep an old one.
    And there's that "vintage value" thing. Almost doesn't matter how bad an amp's original cab is, it's worth more than an amp with a recovered original cab. Plus you can sell the repo cab separately if you want to.
     
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  13. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I would never recover a vintage amp that still has the original covering. Ommv...
     
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  14. Intubator

    Intubator Tele-Meister

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    Nice job on the recover, I especially like the top seam on the left! I am going to try to duplicate this look when I recover my cab. Yeah, It would be great to find the lighter weight original style tweed, but until someone makes it....

    Ironically, if Fender had used the modern stuff a lot more cabs may still be covered, since it seems to be a more robust fabric...
     
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  15. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    But, it scuffs up just like the original! LOL
     
  16. charlie chitlin

    charlie chitlin Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I've used titebond to re-attach plenty of tweed. It is most forgiving, holds and lasts
    If you rush the spray stuff, it won't stick and leaves a mess.
    Contact cement is good if you're good with total commitment. Applied correctly, it is not repositionable.
     
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