Tung oil body finish trouble

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by newuser1, Mar 30, 2017.

  1. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I just load the shellac on thick, wiping layers on layers with a rag dipped into the shellac or a fine brush...... with the body flat on a clean bit of melamine and a neck stick to hold/turn it.... using quick overlapping left/right swishes never going back over the one you just did. , just wet the cloth in a ball or folded flap shape dip and go....

    left right right left..down the body top to bottom.. then wipe around the edges for drips....let that dry off for a few minutes then do another layer or the other side and edges again.......

    Do the other side a few times,, catching any edge drips early to blend them in.....get a good thick coverage on...

    Let that dry off overnight/a few days... then dry sand lightly with a block with old 400 paper... trying not to go through to wood..... that's why I like it thick.... for depth and sanding room....

    You can always do more and more layers to build it up more and sand again to get it nice and flat before a topcoat....

    I don't wipe it down between coats with any fluids... maybe a dust off/polish with a good cloth before each new application... and I keep any water well away from the shellac...... damp hands/damp cloths, etc....

    it's pretty forgiving...
     
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  2. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

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    Would this one work?

    http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/meguiar-s-ultimate-polish-0392730p.html

    Was this the article you were referring to?

    http://www.stewmac.com/How-To/Onlin...olish_for_a_fast_finish_without_spraying.html
     
  3. cmclayton101

    cmclayton101 Tele-Meister

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    Doing a cheap Rosewood Tele knockoff with minwax stain and Tru oil and it is coming out just as I expected. This is the first time I've used Tru oil and everyone is right. It is super easy. I thought I would need several bottles but that's not the case. You use less with every coat.
     
  4. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    regarding this comment - yes, the different porosity will get you different results.

    With a previously coated body sanding through in some areas and leaving the old coating in others will cause color and gloss inconsistencies. You would have the choice of either sanding everything off (including all the old costing/sealer) and preferably using a sealer first (which type depends on which finish). But with soft, porpoise woods like basswood it's better to use paste wood filler to completely fill the grain. Then, whether you apply just a clear coat or a stain (followed by clear) you can control the penetration.
     
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  5. dotnetbrett

    dotnetbrett TDPRI Member

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    So what I hear is that after you sand it a few times you are supposed to wipe it down with a wet rag so that and imperfections in the wood can fuzz up to the top then sand it again and wet rag it again and see it it fuzzes up again. when you wipe it with water again and steel wool it, then you oil it. This is what I have read only. Good luck
     
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  6. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    Two things, one I just noticed -

    1. The above post regarding "grain raising" is correct - and recommended before any finish is applied. Part of the reason for blotchiness is in not performing this procedure, which helps make the surface more consistent.

    2. I just realized the body in question is undoubtedly "pawlonia" - a VERY soft wood. In fact the softest wood used in guitar construction. It's just a couple of steps above balsa wood!

    That being said, I've used it several times because of the light weight. However, it's absolutely terrible as far as achieving consistent finishes go. The different parts used to make a body always vary in grain being "open" or (somewhat) closed, and the grain - even on a single piece - is usually all over the map.

    The only I've seen that gets a semi-consistent transparent finish result is:

    1. Raise the grain with water and sand - at least 3 times

    2. Let it dry - usually a week in good weather to be safe (because it's so soft) - or less if a moisture meter reads under 11% - cheap $15-20 Harbor Freight ones are great to have for finishing work.

    3. 2 coats of lacquer sanding sealer (6 light passes - normal lacquer application) and sand

    4. Apply tinted paste wood filler (not usual retail stuff like "wood filler", "acrylic wood filler", wood dough etc.). Most finishers I know use Mohawk, commonly found at contractor paint stores that stock Mohawk lacquer. It's very easy to use, provides a fairly consistent surface with pawlonia and other soft woods, and little sanding is needed.

    At this point, if the paste wood filler was tinted to the desired "stain" color, it'll look reasonably consistent *if* the wood pieces are not ridiculously different.

    With Pawlonia I've had about 1 body in 4 simply not be acceptable for transparent finishes - and even "good" ones are nothing like a half-decent ash body. They can look interesting - but kind of "weird". For this reason I usually do unique colors - dark greens, deep blues dark gray (which can look almost silver) etc.

    A clear should be applied over the sanded filler coat- a few coats of sanding sealer sanded with 320, then flat lacquer or polyurethane will look fairly "natural" but offer some surface protection; or a pigmented lacquer can be applied to "shade" the surface; or just clear gloss can be used for some depth.

    And if it comes out really ugly a pigmented lacquer can hide it!

    But no matter *what* the finish coat is pawlonia will show dents and scratches. It's inevitable, and usually happens quickly.

    Only when polyester or polyurethane factory-finishes are applied VERY thickly - like Guitar Fetish's cheap factory-finished bodies - is there half-decent surface protection. And it's almost like an eggshell...

    I had one that dented - actually cracked 1/4" deep over a 3" area - when accidentally bumped on a table. And not hard. :(

    And be VERY careful with neck bolts and other screws - NO powered screwdriver use!!!

    Late addition - While Try-Oil is available on Amazon I was told by a buddy in Vancouver that they won't ship it to Canada (or California, or other locations where it violates air quality regulations). We can't get it in L.A. - I used it twice and gave it away. There was nothing special about it that couldn't be achieved with a far less expensive, resin-containing stain/finish.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2017
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