Tuner post wraps how many ?

Discussion in 'Vintage Tele Discussion Forum (pre-1974)' started by Fretting out, Jul 16, 2019.

How many wraps on you tuner post

Poll closed Jul 30, 2019.
  1. As many as possible

    7.1%
  2. About 3 times around

    67.3%
  3. Just 1

    8.2%
  4. Other

    17.3%
  1. Fretting out

    Fretting out Tele-Holic

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    How many wraps do you put on your vintage kluson style tuner posts ?
    And why?

    I usually just use the rule of going 2 and a 1/2 to 3 posts past the post I want to use then clip and wind except for the high E and B I use the whole string on them .
    I don’t have a specific tonal reason for this I just find it works for me. I usually have very little slippage doing it this way.

    I’m just curious what you guys think and how you do yours?
    I was watching a video with Danny Gatton and he said he liked to put as much string around the post as possible.
     
  2. Sparky2

    Sparky2 Friend of Leo's

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    It all depends upon the gauge of the string.

    My heavy E and A strings get one turn around the post before I begin turning and tuning-up.

    D and G get two turns.

    B and bottom E get three or more.

    *boom*
    That's how you do it right there.

    :)
     
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  3. Steve 78

    Steve 78 Friend of Leo's

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    I've read 1.5 minimum, to avoid slipping I guess? I aim for about 2-3 but I'm pretty bad at estimating.
     
  4. VintageSG

    VintageSG Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    The equivalent of two posts for E&A, two and a half for D&G then I'd guess roughly three posts worth for b&e.
     
  5. EsquireBoy

    EsquireBoy Tele-Meister

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    For the longest time I was a believer that the more turns the better. But actually too many turns lead to tuning problems since the string has more chances to get loose around the post. I now aim at 3 wraps max and 2 wraps for low E and A.
     
  6. Ron Garson

    Ron Garson Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    How I like to do mine.
    001.JPG
     
  7. G.Rotten

    G.Rotten Tele-Holic

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    I do pretty much the same thing. Using the whole string on the E & B gets the strings to the bottom of the post changing their angle going to the string tree or nut.
     
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  8. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    I started out with the 'go two posts past the post and wind it up' but after seeing the re-string video of a famous band roadie on youtube a few years back I changed my method to what he does and I've liked it a lot better -- plus it's faster.

    Bring the string to the post, wrap around (3 on low strings 4 on high unwound strings), then feed tight through the post eye (or cut and stuff on split shafts), tighten to pitch. No measuring and no slipping strings.

    .
     
  9. ricknbaker

    ricknbaker Tele-Afflicted

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    I always put them on like this.
    Which gives me about 2 turns round the post. All my tuning issues went away once I started doing it like this

     
  10. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I end up with 2 to 4 wound to thin strings on split shaft tuners.
    I use 3 fingers with a bit of string slack to measure string length before cutting and stuffing it in the hole. I add a little length as I go using a Jedi mind technique to acquire the force that guides me.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2019
  11. Bob Arbogast

    Bob Arbogast Tele-Afflicted

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    With the safe-t-post tuners, I measure and cut the string at the following lengths beyond the post:
    • low E: 2-1/4
    • A: 2-1/2
    • D: 2-3/4
    • G: 3
    • B: 4
    • high E: 4
    I don't know how many total wraps for each string. But using these string lengths seems to provide the proper down angle, which is different for each string.

    On the B and high E, I first make a half-wrap counter clockwise then through the slot, before beginning the clockwise wrapping.
     
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  12. Sanity Inn

    Sanity Inn Tele-Meister

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  13. RottenTheCat

    RottenTheCat Tele-Meister

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    No more than two on any string....maybe 2-1/2 on unwound. Many wraps = stretch, tuning, bending, whammy issues.... Just what locking tuners seek to avoid.
     
  14. FenderGuy53

    FenderGuy53 Poster Extraordinaire

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    The whole point in guitar stringing is to maximize the break angle of the string from the post to the nut.

    Personally speaking, I prefer a single layer of string against the post. No need to make your string post look like a fishing reel. :eek:
     
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  15. hemingway

    hemingway Poster Extraordinaire

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    More than one, less than too many
     
  16. FenderGuy53

    FenderGuy53 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Last edited: Jul 16, 2019
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  17. Guitarteach

    Guitarteach Poster Extraordinaire

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    Jam it through, one and half to two wraps with the pinch method highlighted above trapping the excess.

    No problems with tuning in years.
     
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  18. Adam Wolfaardt

    Adam Wolfaardt Tele-Meister

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    I do 2 or less on the E and A. About 4 on the D and G. Since the machine heads for those strings are far away from the nut and there is no string tree its a good idea to use the extra turns to push the strings down some. Hight two I do about 4. Since there's a string tree I'm not too fussy
     
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  19. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    "Other" Yep. A couple on the low E string, maybe 6-8 or so on the high E string.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2019
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  20. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    I disagree. Sail a sailboat some time and try one wrap on the winch when the wind blows. :>)
    Once the strings settle from new, my electric guitars rarely even need tuning. I'll pull my #1 strat out of the case a week later and it's in perfect tune. No tying the ends or other hocus pocus, just wrapped on the post. The wraps spiral up against each other, compressing the stack of coils against each other and against the string through the hole or slot.... holding the string tight.
     
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