1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Trying the Mohawk Lacquer

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Missing Link, Dec 23, 2020.

  1. Missing Link

    Missing Link Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    399
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Location:
    USA and UK
    Just getting ready use some Mohawk EZ vinyl sealer and Stringed Instrument gloss lacquer on my mahogany Telecaster Hybrid. Question due to it being winter were the temps in my area area around 30-40 degrees in the day time and humidity around 60-70 most of the time, would theses be decent conditions for this product to be used in without fears of fish eye and or orange peel problems. Also If I spray the EZ sealer on can I leave it on without sanding for a week or two or is it best to scuff and go into the spray lacquer right away for best results. I just not sure of the guild line times for this product.

    Thanks in advance
    stay safe

    DL136718.jpg
     
    hemingway, scook and Cali Dude like this.
  2. stratisfied

    stratisfied Tele-Holic

    Age:
    68
    Posts:
    681
    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2019
    Location:
    Midwest
    Nice body.

    I don't think you will be getting good results in those temps. You can have the body at room temp and warm the spray can under running hot water and maybe get away with spraying one side at a time that way. The problem is the atomization of the spray isn't quite right in the cold air and the spray can cools very quickly. You usually wind up with heavier then normal orange peel to wet-sand out, but it can be done if you can work fast.

    You should lay the body flat and quickly spray one side. Bring it back inside to dry and then flip the body over to spray the other side. Repeat this until you have enough coats on to wet-sand and polish, warming the body to room temp and the paint can under hot water each time.

    In a pinch (like finishing a headstock or a neck) with the neck and lacquer at room temp and all prep done, I have stepped out onto the patio, sprayed and brought the neck right back in, getting good results.
     
  3. Cali Dude

    Cali Dude Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    58
    Posts:
    1,055
    Joined:
    May 20, 2020
    Location:
    California
    No help here, but that's going to be a beautiful guitar.
     
  4. dankilling

    dankilling Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    1,548
    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2014
    Location:
    Lehigh Valley, PA
    Interested to see what you think now that it’s Mohawk instead of Behlen
     
  5. Missing Link

    Missing Link Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    399
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Location:
    USA and UK
    stratisfied - Sounds as I would be doing the old Juggling act. Does say that the can temperature should be between 65 and 90 degrees but says nothing of the OAT or Humidity, and thats just the sealer. The Lacquer itself has no can temp or OAT temp or humidity information in any way. Most is common sense when using most any finish but Mohawk (they own Behlen now) should of had a web site that would give more information on the use of their product. I have heard good about Behlen/Mohawk but as a first time user of a rattle can lacquer I may just hold off or find a heated place to work.
    dankilling - not sure if they modified the content of the product any as I have never used either one.
    I did find this on their web page but is pretty much just sales pitch.
    https://www.mohawkconsumerproducts.com/products/guitar/#Guitar Repair
    Cheers
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2020
    Boreas likes this.
  6. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    76
    Posts:
    5,649
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2018
    Location:
    Washington
    Behlens was my standard lacquer until it went away, I have not tried the Mohawk version, but I would expect good results. I had a rule of never shooting lacquer below 60F or above 50% or so RH. The one time I finished in higher humidity I got some pretty serious blushing which forced me to refinish the guitar. It just doesn't make sense to take chances with finish - wait until conditions are perfect.

    Have you pore filled your mahogany?
     
    Boreas likes this.
  7. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,882
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2008
    Location:
    Manheim Pa.
    Hardtail !
     
  8. Boreas

    Boreas Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    2,547
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2019
    Location:
    Adirondack Coast, NY
    FWIW, my money is that Mohawk has not changed the formulation - especially if it is a recent takeover. Probably made with the same formula with the same equipment by the same employees still wearing Behlen hats.

    I would email Mohawk and request MSDS and detailed instruction sheets for the products you are using. Then see if you can find old Behlen MSDS sheets and compare them. This would give you some indication if there has been a formulation change.
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2020
    dankilling likes this.
  9. Sea Devil

    Sea Devil Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    58
    Posts:
    2,259
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    The Mohawk stuff is fantastic, but it will behave differently at low temps. The humidity may not be optimal, but shouldn't be a problem with light coats.
     
  10. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    1,342
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2017
    Location:
    Tampa Bay
    I'm with Freeman on this one. Trying to spray anything in air cooler than 60 degrees is not going to work. You won't get decent flow out. See the thread JuneauMike did on spraying in Alaska. He managed to juggle heat lamps and a tent of sorts to get a decent finish. Personally, I never spray in under 70 degrees (but I live in Florida)
     
    Boreas likes this.
  11. Missing Link

    Missing Link Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    399
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Location:
    USA and UK
    Mahogany grain filled twice and ultra smooth with 1000 grit paper. It's a hard tail, have not much use for whammy bars.
    I thinking this build can wait a bit longer, maybe a good thing if I just leave the body in sunlight were the UV rays will darken the grain naturally.

    Thank guys, Cheers
     
    Boreas likes this.
  12. stratisfied

    stratisfied Tele-Holic

    Age:
    68
    Posts:
    681
    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2019
    Location:
    Midwest
    The general rule with lacquer is "do not apply in direct sunlight, below 55F, above 90F or in conditions of high humidity" as Freeman said. While Mohawk doesn't say that on the can, I can guarantee their product will be no exception to those conditions. They just assume the surface to be painted will be at the same temperature of the lacquer.

    One other caution about spraying outside in cooler weather ... if it is too cold outside and the painted surface cools below the temperature of the paint you are applying, you can get clouding (blushing) from condensation forming in the paint.

    As you mentioned, trying to spray a body vs spraying a neck is a bit of juggling act going from inside to out. You can create a portable stand and attach a paint stick to the neck cavity to move the body. A simple board with nails/screws spaced in tripod fashion (1 at the neck pocket and 2 at the bridge) will support the body whether spraying or drying and can be carried in one hand and the body on the end of the paint stick in the other.

    It still is dicey and you may want to consider alternatives like wipe-on polyurethane followed by buffing, which gives a pretty nice semi-gloss finish. You can break it down later when you are able to spray outside and do the desired high gloss then.

    I plan ahead and finish bodies and necks in spring and early fall (it's too damn hot and hot and humid to spray and on cooler summer days. Chicago is too hot and humid most of the summer. I do the assembly of the guitars over the winter months.
     
  13. eallen

    eallen Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,134
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2013
    Location:
    Bargersville/Indianapolis, Indiana
    Mowhawk makes good stuff. The only way you can do a lacquer finish in those temps is to keep the body and lacquer inside, walk outside for 30 seconds to spray, bring it all back inside to dry until the next coat. Be aware the inside odor will pretty will drive you out+
     
  14. hemingway

    hemingway Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,720
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2012
    Location:
    London, UK
    Wood on wood. Lovely.
     
  15. natec

    natec Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    154
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    Location:
    Portland Oregon
    I'm a rookie so take this with a grain of salt.. the temp *outside* doesn't seem to matter as much as the humidity does. I won't spray over 55% humidity. Here in western Oregon those are rare days in the winter.

    I have had success on dry cold days (50% humidity, 40 degrees F outside) as long as I warm up the can. I started out sitting it in a bowl of hot water, but also works if I prop up a heat gun and point it at the can.

    Subjectively, the stewmac aerosols work better than mohawk / behlen. Also darker colors seem to be more finicky (tobacco brown or encode brown especially).

    Good luck and let us know how it goes.
     
    Boreas likes this.
  16. Missing Link

    Missing Link Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    399
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Location:
    USA and UK
    Right now I am holding off as we are about to get into the times here were the snow is at the door step and the humidity is all over the place so best to wait. I shot lacquer from my gun before witch I prefer but my compressor went TC on me so I am relying on the rattle cans. Mainly just never used the Mohawk in a can but heard good about it.

    Thanks
     
    Boreas likes this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.