Truth or Dare: a variation I dare you, Are You Dyslexic?

VintageSG

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Dyslexic here. 'Diagnosed' aged 15. Properly, formerly, sit down and test all functions, following a major head injury in my 40's.
Dyslexic, and off their charts Aspergers.
I didn't do too well at school and was always in trouble for my awful handwriting and 'stubbornness' in a few subjects, yet in others, I excelled. Odd that.

I wouldn't trade what it has given me in other areas though. Not at all.
 

bettyseldest

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My brother in law was almost four before he could walk and, didn't speak until he was seven. At school he was told that he was illiterate. He would have been thirteen when his mother died. At seventeen the Garda pulled him over for drink driving. The officer let him off on condition that he gave up drink and helped him out with a youth project. As a result my BIL started working on engines and equipment, eventually running his own car and agricultiral equipment repair and maintenance business. He bought his own premises to run the business and later his own house. About seven years ago he was interviewed by the local paper. They produced a glossy book featuring the lives of successful local businessmen, with four pages devoted to my BIL. The article said that he had achieved his success despite being illiterate. When a local psychologist read this it did not ring true to him, so arranged to meet with my BIL. After years of trying to hide the fact that he could not read, my BIL now proudly tells everyone that he is dyslexic. He is different, that's all. I just wish we could get him to move out of his old caravan, and into his house, but he knows best what makes him happy.
 

Kandinskyesque

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Dyslexic here. 'Diagnosed' aged 15. Properly, formerly, sit down and test all functions, following a major head injury in my 40's.
Dyslexic, and off their charts Aspergers.
I didn't do too well at school and was always in trouble for my awful handwriting and 'stubbornness' in a few subjects, yet in others, I excelled. Odd that.

I wouldn't trade what it has given me in other areas though. Not at all.
I'm almost the other way round from you.
Major head injury at 17 and tested ('passed'/'diagnosed) with dyslexia in my 40s.
Asperger's diagnosis at 50.

I did rather well at school though in maths and physics but couldn't work with the written word for toffee.
Needless to say though, the university education that I burst a gut to get started with went south very quickly due to the brain injury.

The Irlen tinted specs I started wearing from 2015 have been a game changer for me, lines of text don't merge as much as they used to.
 

carpenter

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mountains in Kentucky
How would I know that I am seeing the same thing that everyone else is seeing.
I am color blind red green. Example raccoons and tabby cats look green to me.
Mocked for years for that.
 

VintageSG

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I did rather well at school though in maths and physics but couldn't work with the written word for toffee.
Needless to say though, the university education that I burst a gut to get started with went south very quickly due to the brain injury.

The Irlen tinted specs I started wearing from 2015 have been a game changer for me, lines of text don't merge as much as they used to.

Maths?, doddle.
Physics?, doddle
Chemistry?, doddle
Metalwork?, doddle
Mech.Eng?, doddle
History?, doddle <-- Hmmm
Geography?, doddle <-- Hmmm

English?, failed
Biology?, failed
I dropped art, french and music at options time. Art and french because I struggle to draw the curtains, or a conclusion; and french?, like english, but difficlterer. Music was dropped because the music teachers shouldn't have been allowed to destroy the subject like that. Abysmal.

The history and geography were successful in no small part thanks to having awesome, enthusiastic teachers who cared more for me understanding the subject than my spider-vomit scrawlings.

I prefer text to be on a yellow or even grey background, be it screen or paper. I have a sheet of coloured plastic I can lay atop paper text to help, and help it does.

When it came to post-16 education, a Tandy ( Radio Shack ) computer, then a BBC Micro, with a Spectrum for games, then later a PC clone made for rapid progress. Word processors rock! Using a blue background with yellow text was the way for me with Wordwise, Inter-word and the like on the BBC, then Wordperfect 4+5.1 on the PC.

I may well look at some tinted specs.
 

Kandinskyesque

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Maths?, doddle.
Physics?, doddle
Chemistry?, doddle
Metalwork?, doddle
Mech.Eng?, doddle
History?, doddle <-- Hmmm
Geography?, doddle <-- Hmmm

English?, failed
Biology?, failed
I dropped art, french and music at options time. Art and french because I struggle to draw the curtains, or a conclusion; and french?, like english, but difficlterer. Music was dropped because the music teachers shouldn't have been allowed to destroy the subject like that. Abysmal.

The history and geography were successful in no small part thanks to having awesome, enthusiastic teachers who cared more for me understanding the subject than my spider-vomit scrawlings.

I prefer text to be on a yellow or even grey background, be it screen or paper. I have a sheet of coloured plastic I can lay atop paper text to help, and help it does.

When it came to post-16 education, a Tandy ( Radio Shack ) computer, then a BBC Micro, with a Spectrum for games, then later a PC clone made for rapid progress. Word processors rock! Using a blue background with yellow text was the way for me with Wordwise, Inter-word and the like on the BBC, then Wordperfect 4+5.1 on the PC.

I may well look at some tinted specs.
Looks almost like my school report card if I added that history was an abject failure despite my influential uncle being my teacher, though I've been a local history buff throughout adulthood.
I was good at woodwork but discouraged from 'non academic' subjects by the school who seemed more interested in university placements on their league tables.
Music was ruined too by teachers who saw the guitar as an inferior instrument.

Here's a link to the Irlen folks. Finding out about the benefits was a game changer for me.

https://irlen.com/what-is-irlen-syndrome/

Addendum: I have my Irlen testing done at Glasgow Caledonian University Optometry dept. It's not pseudo-science.
I've ended up with a tint that's a combination of Rose and Orange.
I now see the word as an optimistic Ulsterman;)
 
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Tarkus60

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I have it. It came on as I aged. I have to proof read everything. Numbers are worse.....
 

telemnemonics

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I'm almost the other way round from you.
Major head injury at 17 and tested ('passed'/'diagnosed) with dyslexia in my 40s.
Asperger's diagnosis at 50.

I did rather well at school though in maths and physics but couldn't work with the written word for toffee.
Needless to say though, the university education that I burst a gut to get started with went south very quickly due to the brain injury.

The Irlen tinted specs I started wearing from 2015 have been a game changer for me, lines of text don't merge as much as they used to.
School was all over around 11th grade but in that limited sample I recall I got 100 on math tests while doing it all wrong; but I wrote right wile failing English with 100% consistency and generally having a better vocabulary than my teachers up to 10th grade or so when drugs entered the curriculum.

Head injury came my way at 15 but I could still walk and talk plus wasn’t supposed to complain about pain.
Diagnosed with addiction at 38 but the medical terms got changed every five years since that time which leads me to believe that if doctors keep switching the words around they must have severe dyslexia?

Or maybe they change the diagnosis every five years to suit the latest drugs they create to get druggies off drugs?
Interestingly, jails and big pharma have cooperative contracts where locked up substance abusers bring funding to both industries if both industries agree on a case by case basis that the inmate needs meds.

Dyslexia is big big business!
 

ChicknPickn

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As a lefthander (writing only), I wrote my name backwards. I broke out of it and most dyslexia problems by the third grade. Now, as a senior, the dyslexia is returning.
 

ping-ping-clicka

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Dyslexic here. 'Diagnosed' aged 15. Properly, formerly, sit down and test all functions, following a major head injury in my 40's.
Dyslexic, and off their charts Aspergers.
I didn't do too well at school and was always in trouble for my awful handwriting and 'stubbornness' in a few subjects, yet in others, I excelled. Odd that.

I wouldn't trade what it has given me in other areas though. Not at all.
++good horror show for attitude, that's the spirit that I wanna hear bout! Lemonade , make it a tall one.
same here mayn, some subject I did well in .
life in the early reading circle was like somethin' out of Dante's Inferno awwwk!
thank for playin'
sigue sigue.jpg
 

ping-ping-clicka

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....yet Big Pharma will reap hundreds of millions of $$ convincing us to medicate it away.....
that's the spirit, I'm not broken , I'm just different in the land of ridged conformity beep-beep
if have a message, pause don't worry bout the spellin' I'll rearrange the words to just have something innerestin' to do😷😷😷
 

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ping-ping-clicka

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As a lefthander (writing only), I wrote my name backwards. I broke out of it and most dyslexia problems by the third grade. Now, as a senior, the dyslexia is returning.
yes , yes it's true chemobrain doesn't help!
manuals for music gear are becoming a pain in the ass.😵
 

ping-ping-clicka

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In the words of one of my favorite poets:

Come mothers and fathers throughout the land
And don't criticize what you can't understand
he 's alright he had his time, and was blessed with a dedicated audience,
The kingdoms of experience, in a precious winds they rot
While paupers change possessions,
Each one wishing for what the other has got
And the princess and the prince discuss what's real and what is not
It doesn't matter inside the Gates of Eden
 

String Tree

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Up North
The shaming of the dyslexic is a common occurrence, so I can understand I you are gun-shy about revealing your dyslexic hidden secret , but don't worry most people based on my own fabricated statistics don't know that you're dyslexic (99.7%), they just tink you're stick-stupid or maybe stupid as a brick.
If you are dare, ( pause )another opportunity to be publicly shamed along with the glue-huffers and used tire sniffers as well as others
others equally disenfranchised from community respectability is here, the challenge is on going.

View attachment 974158
I am not Dyslexic, Its the other way around.
 

Tele-beeb

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The Bluegrass
If it helps… I was Dyslexic when Dyslexic wasn’t cool.
I am quite (self-eval) intelligent (Deans Scholar twice and Presidents scholar once), however, I was tested in grade school for sp.ed.
I try to make sense of the world around me.
A close family member scoffs at my evaluation that I am dyslexic because I have developed strategies to ‘fit.’
A bit annoying, but also affirmation of how well I did.
In the 70’s it was almost life or death to not ‘fit.’
 




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