True or False: If You Don't Like the Amp Immediately You Never Will

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by yamatele, Jan 27, 2011.

  1. castpolymer

    castpolymer Poster Extraordinaire

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    For me, false. I bought a DRRI over a PRRI a few years ago. I liked the DRRI better at the time. Now, I have a PRRI and it is no contest.
     
  2. tgfmike

    tgfmike Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I disagree, speaking just for myself. A change to a 'darker' speaker almost always makes me like an amp better.
     
  3. teleamp

    teleamp Poster Extraordinaire

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    If I dont like an amp when I try it, I dont buy it.
     
  4. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I'd agree.
    Guitars sometimes fool me, but never amps.
     
  5. teleamp

    teleamp Poster Extraordinaire

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    Bill, you make any guitar sound great.
     
  6. Chiogtr4x

    Chiogtr4x Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have to say I have been fooled (its been a while!) by both guitars and amps that sounded good in the music shop (at low volume) and admittedly I bought on implulse as they were/are affordable popular items, but could NOT warm up to them at gigs: with guitars it would be pickups that were too strong and muddy (regardless of adjustment) and amps with spiky upper mids/treble and crappy OD channels...live and learn- "Don't go grocery shopping when you are hungry!" ;)
     
  7. SngleCoil

    SngleCoil Tele-Holic

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    I generally agree. Amps have a foundational voice that either speaks to you or doesn't....now that doesn't mean that your taste can't change over time, but that usually doesn't happen overnight.
     
  8. adeiderich

    adeiderich Tele-Afflicted

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    I think that either is it in there or it's not....you can change components (tubes, speakers, tone pots, etc.) but the basic DNA of power, cabinet size and speaker size will still dominate what comes out of the amp. That being said, I have swapped out a 12X7 tube for a 12AU and upgraded to a replacement speaker on a small hybrid amp and have "improved" the amp's sound but it still sound like an 8" hybrid amp.
     
  9. Wyzsard

    Wyzsard Friend of Leo's

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    Only amp that grabbed me right away and said "buy me" is the one I have now. When I got it home, it sounded better.

    I've only had 6 tube amps, and all of them but this one, there were days that something just wasn't clicking. Same room, same guitar, same riffs, found myself second guessing. None of those grabbed me right away, I bought them all off cl at a price I knew I could flip them for and make a few bucks, which I eventually did.

    This one I kept, a Delta Blues 210, aint going nowhere. I'm curious about tube swaps, but I have no regrets.

    So in my case, with only a couple of years of experience with tube amps, I'd say yes, if I don't love it before I buy it, I'll probably wind up selling it.
     
  10. chezdeluxe

    chezdeluxe Poster Extraordinaire

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    True and False

    Why would I bother buying and taking home an amp that didn't sound good in the first place unless it was secondhand and I knew that a service / new speaker etc would make it sing again.
     
  11. 8upSS

    8upSS Tele-Holic

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    I haven't read every post in this thread word for word, so this may be redundant.

    I say true, given you start with "median" settings, like I always do.

    IOWs if your not close to a good sound with the knobs at 5, you're probably not going to be happy in the long run.
     
  12. G-P

    G-P Tele-Meister

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    I once read an interview with either Brian May or David Gilmore where the remark was made that he would plug into an amp, dial in the tone and just nail it. Nirvana. Then he would turn the amp off and set down the guitar without changing any settings. The following day he would turn everything back on, pick up the guitar and go blah, what is this rubbish.

    I think when someone is playing an amp at the music store, they are in essence auditioning the amp. Likely they are listening for very specific traits. If they are able to find the characteristics they are seeking then they may very well connect with the amp.

    But if it isn't happening at the shop it's unlikely the amp is leaving with that player.
     
  13. Hiker

    Hiker Poster Extraordinaire

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    Uh huh, that's right!
     
  14. detuned

    detuned Tele-Holic

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    Agree: I had a Top Hat Super Deluxe which I did everything possible to make work for me. It's a fantastic amp, & Brian Gerhard is a genius & first rate human being, but this just wasn't the amp for me.

    Disagree: When I got my Dr. Z Maz Jr NR, I wondered what all the fuss was about. After about 6 weeks, I figured it out. World-class amp, & Mike Zaite is another one of those top-quality people.

    That says something, but I'm not sure what it is...
     
  15. StoogeSurfer

    StoogeSurfer Tele-Afflicted

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    Recently I had the pleasure to play a Victoria 45410. It was in a store full of amps, I didn't touch the dials, and it blew the rest of them away. If it weren't so pricey and big, I would have taken it home that day. ;)
     
  16. anacephalic

    anacephalic Tele-Meister

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    hugely disagree but i learned it the hard way. Under normal circumstances i would say yes just as pointedly.

    I ordered an original version Dr Z prescription sight unseen back in 98 based on a suggestion from Stu at fat sounds after i told him what i was looking for in an amp. Got it. Plugged in. Pretty much didn't like it but was too cheap to pay to send it back. Also i figured that if he would recommend that amp over a bunch of other things he had, and he had most everything, the amp had to have potential, right

    The amp sounded sterile, icepicky, no sustain. One problem was the amps and it was real. Two V-30s in an open back cab is tooooo much midrange fun. The other problem was me not having a clue of what to do with such a dynamic amplifier. By keeping it i was forced to take the tone-on-the hands approach to things. Now every time i take it out it floors me with the tones that can be gotten out of it. Still, not an easy amp to play. If i don't play it for a while the learning curve is there for a little while till i get the hang of it. One of the best amps i've ever played. guess stu was right.

    Now take an amp like a victoria regal or a divided by 13. what's not to love right off the bat?
     
  17. Timbertea

    Timbertea Tele-Holic

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    I've been burned a few times on demo's of amps that I liked initially, and the thrill wore off fairly quickly when I got it home, or starting trying to use it out live, or in reversal. Now I wont take an amp home from a store without carting it off to the loud room, and spending a very long demo with it with as much of my rig as I can possibly lug with me. I still do buy some things sight unseen, but I try to make it as rare as possible.

    I've had three amps that really grew on me over time that my initial impressions were not always the greatest:

    I hated my Kalamazoo Model 1 when I first got it because I hadn't found the good tones out of it. At low volume it was just kind of meah sounding, and nothing special cheap practice amp tone. It wasn't until I opened it up with the right guitar, and raised the volumes to the edge of max that it came alive. My brother gave me my first one of these, and it was so he could get his Fender Bronco back from me. As such I kind of expected it to be a Bronco replacement that would deliver the same sort of goods, but it was a different animal, and because its coolness was in something very different from the Fender sparkle tone of the Bronco had it took me awhile to realize what I had. Sometimes our expectations cloud our judgment. The tones it does well, it does amazingly well, and its one of those amps I've probably recorded more than any other because of it.

    I was severely disappointed with the tone, and difficulty of dialing in my Rivera M100. I always heard some things of promise in the tone, but it was a long time coming before I learned how to dial in nearly everything under the sun for it. Some of it was expectations as it was bought to replace a Fender Tonemaster I had to part with in a moment of poverty, and poor judgment. Its got twitchy controls like a lot of Mesa Boogie amps do, and it just didn't want to give up the goods without getting over the learning curve. It took me about a year, and having to use it live for awhile for me to really come to terms with how good the basic tones were, and to figure out the way too many dials, switches, and knobs to make it do 8 great tones in a night, and 10 more passable tones for covers. Now that I know what to do with it, its a very hard amp for me to part with (even though I have a few I consider superior at the moment). Not a great in the house amp, buts its a great concert amp.

    The Peavey Windsor. My initial impression of this amp was terrible. It was buzzy, basic, and just didn't seem to have "it" in any way. I thought "I've had Crate solid state amp's that sounded better". This was merely a learning curve, and volume issue. I still don't think it is a great amp at lower volumes, but it can be made to sing once its moving some air. Once its dialed in (and part of that is plugging into the correct input for what you want to do), fitted with better tubes, matched to better speakers, and at volume it is in old Marshall to JCM800 territory, and sounds rather pleasant for a cheap amp. It can get some useful tones off of the high gain input, but for the sounds I need, and like I have to go into the low gain input. Once I learned which input I really needed it became a joy to use for rehearsals. Had I not taken it home to mess with it out of severe frustration -- I never would have discovered what it could do. I was considering just bypassing the entire preamp, and using it for its power amp only until that point. The Windsor was something that was purchased in a package deal along with a nice PA, bass, bass amp, mics, rack effects, and other goodies. I had always figured on just flipping a lot of the other included stuff in that deal rather than keeping it around. I'm now grateful that we did as I don't have to lug anything to band practice if I don't want to. We have nicer stuff to use, but this works, and considering I probably paid less than $80 for it ... What isn't to love?
     
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