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Truck mod question: has anybody "leveled" a 2wd?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by haggardfan1, Mar 2, 2021.

  1. haggardfan1

    haggardfan1 Friend of Leo's

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    I have a 2007 crew cab Silverado Classic. In the process of upgrading the truck as far as some electrical repairs, new stereo on the way, etc., I'm pondering raising the front end with coil spring spacers because that way is inexpensive, and doesn't require longer shocks and the like. I do not want to lower the rear, and I don't want to spend a fortune; if that;s the case I'll leave it as is.

    I only want to go about 1 1/2 to 2", and only in the front. I already talked to my mechanic about it, and he said there would likely be no drawbacks.

    Any of you have any real-life experience with this?
     
  2. swervinbob

    swervinbob Tele-Afflicted

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    I know a few people who have done 2wd. You’ll have to adjust your headlights. I don’t think you will have any issues like gas mileage or anything.

    I did it to a 4wd and then put 33 inch mud tires. I went from 18-20 mpg to 13-14 mpg, but thats probably due to the weight and tread of the tire than anything else.
     
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  3. Preacher

    Preacher Friend of Leo's

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    We used to put coil spring spacers on the rear of my miata for track days. It raised the back just enough to avoid hitting some of the bumps in the track.

    I don't see why it would cause any issues with a Silverado.
     
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  4. Speedy454

    Speedy454 Tele-Holic

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    I have a 1989 GMC 2500 that I considered doing this on.
    But after looking at how I actually used the truck, I decided against it.
    Mine is a 'Light Duty' 3/4 ton, and sits a little high in the back. But it only takes about 500 pounds in the bed to level it off. Since this truck 'works' more than it plays, I opted to leave it alone rather than level it when empty and have it nose up when loaded or towing. But if you rarely load it or tow, there are very few drawbacks to a 1 1/2" leveling kit.
     
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  5. NC E30

    NC E30 TDPRI Member

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    Just don't go too far and end up with a squat like those youngsters
     

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  6. NC E30

    NC E30 TDPRI Member

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    To better answer your question, I used to work in a truck store and we did those (leveling kits, not squats) all the time. While you don't have to get longer shocks, the seals will be riding in a different position on the shaft, so it is a good idea. You should also have the shop do an alignment, or take it for one as soon as you pick it up. Doing some things to freshen up your truck is way less expensive than buying a new one!
     
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  7. gregulator450

    gregulator450 Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Back in the day I had a 2005 2WD Tundra on which my brother-in-law and I installed this exact type of leveling kit. I don't think we went a full 2", but it ended up closer to 1-1/2". We did it to fit some slightly taller tires. It was simple to install, and I just took it in for an alignment when I was done. Worked out great, made room for the BFG's, and made the truck look better. No drawbacks whatsoever.
     
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  8. haggardfan1

    haggardfan1 Friend of Leo's

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    The actual difference in height between the center of the front fender and the center of the rear fender is 2.5".

    I'm thinking about doing a 1.5" spacer level for two reasons...according to my research it is unlikely to harm any suspension parts prematurely or affect the ride too much, and I don't want the truck to sit low in the rear if I happen to haul a heavy load or tongue-heavy trailer. Two inches of lift might not hurt anything, ever, but I'd rather keep it conservative.

    This would purely for aesthetics, and would likely never see any significant off road use other than a muddy road or pasture; that is, no significant twisting of any components.
     
  9. suave eddie

    suave eddie Friend of Leo's

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    Pardon my ignorance, but what is the purpose of this?
     
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  10. haggardfan1

    haggardfan1 Friend of Leo's

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    In my case, purely aesthetics.

    Two-wheel-drive trucks, from what I've read, are raked down front (or sprung higher in rear) from the factory so that if a heavy load or trailer is used, the truck will level and not sit way down in the rear end. Drastic lifts on trucks are another matter, and not what I am interested in. The stock Chevy Z71 from the same era as mine just has a slightly more aggressive stance that I would like to attain if not too costly. I don't run oversize wheels, although my tires are one size taller than factory for the same reason (and because the first time I replaced tires, there were MANY more options in 265/70/17 than in 245/70/17).

    Editorial note, I grew up in an area of SW Louisiana where there was a Jeep or 4wd truck in every driveway. It isn't much different where I live now, in Northeastern Texas. I have never understood the purpose of lifting a truck radically so that it is difficult to enter the cab.

    The axles only get as high as the tire/wheel assembly allows, and you are going to get stuck based on axle drag-- and NOTHING else on the vehicle--no matter how bad*** that 4x4 may look.

    All of us pretty much went anywhere we wanted to in the river bottoms back in the late 70's, and you didn't see many vehicles lifted to the degree that folks do it now. Heck, no one could afford it!
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2021
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  11. Whatizitman

    Whatizitman Friend of Leo's

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    I think the other cheap-ish option is adjustable shocks. Some folks with 4x4 IFS do that instead of a lift or longer arms, etc... I imagine 2wd wouldn't be much different.
     
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  12. haggardfan1

    haggardfan1 Friend of Leo's

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    I'm really considering 1 1/2" for these very reasons. Everything in moderation :).

    I don't think that in fourteen years, I have ever had anything heavy enough in the bed of my truck to make it appear dead level; but there's always that possibility.
    Neither of my trailers makes a bit of difference.
     
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