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Tru oiled neck mods

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Gaz_, Mar 6, 2021.

  1. Gaz_

    Gaz_ Tele-Meister

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    About 18 months ago I tru oiled the neck of my kit built 12 string tele. I like the finish, and find it plays nicely, but I've been thinking of modifying the neck. The neck is a very fat profile, so I've been thinking about sanding a few mm off the back of it and maybe rounding off the headstock a little.

    My question is, what's the best way to go about it with the tru oil, could I patch it afterwards or would I need to fully remove it first, and if that's the case, how?!

    I'm getting ready to take it to pieces for a fret level, so I'm just trying to work out if it's worth doing both. Although as I type this I talking myself out of it... But it would still be good to know for the future!

    And because we all like pics, here's my masterpiece. Riccy strung 12 string telecaster, q pickups esquire in the bridge, Creamery toaster mid 63 in the neck, 5 way switching with separate volume and tones. This thing SINGS! 16150339867793858034722033708242.jpg
     
  2. Tarkus60

    Tarkus60 Tele-Meister

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    amazing
     
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  3. fraser

    fraser Tele-Afflicted

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    Just do the sanding work and afterwards apply more tru oil.
    Unless theres a tint in there ( doesnt appear like there is from pics) it will look fine.

    i would likely give the existing finish a good wipe with naptha to be sure nothing prevents the new oil from sticking is all.
     
  4. RomanS

    RomanS Poster Extraordinaire

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    +1

    I actually did this with a TruOil-treated Warmoth roasted maple neck a while ago; it's one with a boatneck profile (soft V), and after I had been playing it for a while, i wanted to soften/flatten the "spine" - took off maybe half a mm from the nut to around the 7th fret. After I did that with coarse sandpaper, I blended the transition to the TruOil-treated rest of the neck with a finer grit, then applied two more coats of TruOil - can't see the transition at all!
     
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  5. Gaz_

    Gaz_ Tele-Meister

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    Amazing thanks, I knew someone would know! I don't hate the neck, it's nice and wide which I like, but it is very round backed. And as a rhythm guitarist I find chording gets trickier higher up the neck which isn't helped by me tuning to D standard, while the rest of the band tunes to standard so I'm always into the fatter bit! When I first cut the headstock I liked the straight edge look, but as it's gone on I think it's the only bit left that makes it "homemade".

    So it sounds the the mods could be fairly painless (except the fear of sanding through to the truss!)
    Cheers All!
     
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  6. Luthier Vandros

    Luthier Vandros Tele-Afflicted

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    Gorgeous.

    I just finished re-profiling one of my maple necks and had to sand through the tru-oil finish i previously applied. As long as you aren’t building up layers for a clear gloss finish, there will be no witness lines. You will see a difference in shade between the old and new, where the older finish will have ambered. Nothing a trip to the tanning salon or a few days in the sun won’t fix.
     
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  7. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    I did exactly the same thing that Roman did :).

    I originally finished the neck with TruOil, but I just couldn't get used to that "V" shape down in cowboy territory.

    So after about a year, I did a subtle re-shape of the neck and re-finished with T.O.

    You really can't tell where or how the finish blended in - it looks good.

    T.O. is a very forgiving finish ;).

    .
     
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  8. BigBillow

    BigBillow Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    fwiw, a cabinet scraper is a great way to slowly reshape neck profile.

    Good luck, it’s (still) gonna look great when you’re done!
     
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  9. stefanhotrod

    stefanhotrod Tele-Holic

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    Truoil is the most forgiving and most versatile finish ever. Sand that neck and put on new coats of Truoil.

    Know what? You can even finish plastics and bakelite with Truoil. It works!
     
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