Trouble with my new puppy.

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Bones

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Get a squirt gun or a spray bottle; fill it with water.
When boundaries are crossed, squirt puppy in the face. Re-enforce with a stern "NO".
Distract the pup with a ball or another of their toys, soon enough, no more bleeding.
Went through a similar deal with a pup myself, still have the scars to prove it.
This puppy has already been traumatized by being removed from the litter too soon, your suggestion will only add to the problem. It's a great way to create a lifetime problem from a temporary one.
 

ameetnsharma

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Get a professional's help and advice. It seems to me that she needs socialization with other dogs to learn bite inhibition. But I may be wrong.
 

ghostwolf

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This puppy has already been traumatized by being removed from the litter too soon, your suggestion will only add to the problem. It's a great way to create a lifetime problem from a temporary one.
Your opinion doesn't match the results i've experienced, but to each their own.
 

stormsedge

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Get the gloves. Next time she is aggressive, carefully roll her on her side...hold her head and body down---growling deep, bite her ear hard enough to make her "yip"...draw blood if that is what it takes. Both you and your wife should do it to place the pup third in line. I've never had a dog bite me after establishing pack order in this manner. Ymmv.
 

radtz

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I remember when Clarke was a pup. He had these teeny tiny razor sharp pin fangs. I was so happy when those fell out. Every nip hurt, He was also fond of biting my nose.
 

chris m.

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Yes, they're pack animals, so are we. Being leader of the pack doesn't necessarily mean be tough or a jerk.

Most people don't give their dogs enough good activity. Fortunately most dogs are good and survive that. For a little puppy we always do a lot of activity and off leash. That teaches them who the leaders are. Of course you have to be careful about cars and dangers when you do the off leash time but it usually makes a big difference for getting a great pet.

@Toadtele be very careful with the reward with treats too many people do. If not careful it becomes treating the dogs for bad behavior. Use simple commands, not too many, and be consistent.

Good luck.
When I took my dog to dog training school I learned a lot. The trainers aren't really training the dog-- they are training YOU how to consistently train your dog.

One great piece of advice I learned was that if the dog is doing something you don't like, you have to give them something to do that you do like. They aren't going to do nothing, especially a puppy. So you have to find games you can play with them that are exciting and interesting for them that do not involve nipping or the development of undesired behaviors. For example, playing tug-of-war with pull toys is typically not recommended, but learning how to fetch is.

Puppies need to sleep an incredible amount. Something like 20 hours a day. So hopefully the puppy isn't sleep deprived. That will not help on the behavior front. But when they are awake they should be getting lots of appropriate activities and stimulus.
 

JL_LI

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Your puppy is a puppy. Yours didn’t come with an instruction manual? Apply what you learned raising kids and you and the puppy will survive puppyhood. If your kids didn’t turn out well, give the puppy to someone who’s kids turned out ok.
 

Bones

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Get the gloves. Next time she is aggressive, carefully roll her on her side...hold her head and body down---growling deep, bite her ear hard enough to make her "yip"...draw blood if that is what it takes. Both you and your wife should do it to place the pup third in line. I've never had a dog bite me after establishing pack order in this manner. Ymmv.
This is insane , you shouldn't be allowed anywhere near a dog or puppy.
 

Bones

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Your opinion doesn't match the results i've experienced, but to each their own.
My opinion is based a whole lot of experience assessing dogs that need re-homing as well as assessing the people who want to adopt them, in addition to working with trainers and behaviorists.. When the developers of the "alpha theory" retract their findings and admit that their research was severely flawed and their conclusions should not be followed, that says a lot.
 

sax4blues

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Our new pup was born Aug-7 and came to us at 10 weeks, she is now 5 months. She is a LOT of work, but it’s labor of love and every day she is a little more calm and well behaved. I could make a list mile long of the mischief she has gotten into, including mouthing with needle teeth. All of it is normal to the 7 dogs I’ve had before. And just like kids with clear and consistent training they grow out of it.

Personally I love the experience.
A93CE694-183A-4FC0-BA71-33854FC19826.jpeg
 

ndcaster

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we had a hound puppy in Louisiana who had issues, so we took him to a pro trainer

he used to quip that "it takes a jerk to train a dog" and trained our (huge) class how to train our dogs with positive and negative reinforcements -- both are equally important

we should've bought stock in whoever makes Snausages, but I digress

that hound is now long gone, but we got a Covid puppy, a rescue, some sort of shepherd/lab mix, who had a cigarette burn on top of her head and on her side

she is neurotic, chases her tail obsessively, slobbers on and then licks her butt, and is probably more of a source of stress in the family than a balm. we went to the vet, who prescribed some kind of mild doggie valium for using when the dog gets bad for too long

our first dog (a male, also a rescue) took a while to settle down, but my advice, for what it's worth, is to get some professional help

dogs are well-known creatures, and the amount of professional experience out there is huge

use it
 

getbent

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we had a hound puppy in Louisiana who had issues, so we took him to a pro trainer

he used to quip that "it takes a jerk to train a dog" and trained our (huge) class how to train our dogs with positive and negative reinforcements -- both are equally important

we should've bought stock in whoever makes Snausages, but I digress

that hound is now long gone, but we got a Covid puppy, a rescue, some sort of shepherd/lab mix, who had a cigarette burn on top of her head and on her side

she is neurotic, chases her tail obsessively, slobbers on and then licks her butt, and is probably more of a source of stress in the family than a balm. we went to the vet, who prescribed some kind of mild doggie valium for using when the dog gets bad for too long

our first dog (a male, also a rescue) took a while to settle down, but my advice, for what it's worth, is to get some professional help

dogs are well-known creatures, and the amount of professional experience out there is huge

use it

surprisingly, a yoga teacher once explained to me why a dog will licks its butt.
 

Dostradamas

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This thread has opened my eyes to how much happy pet owners differ in thier rearing techniques.

How people interact with the animal kingdom says a lot to me what point of view they navigate the world from
 
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ReverendRevolver

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6 weeks is too young to be removed. That’s when the other pups and older dogs show them the hierarchy.
This is probably the root. Puppies interact to learn what is expected, including amount of pressure for play biting and when to tone it down. I know people think stormsedge is talking crazy (and I wouldn't bite a puppy.......) But when we first got our boxer (he was a 3 year old rescue at the time, had been not fed and isolated before the shelter got him) his play biting was really hard.
We got him broke of that by socializing with other dogs, and when he bit us too hard, my wife would "yip" and I'd act like I'd been shot.
It took about a month before he stopped leaving marks on our forearms, but he eventually "got it".

Puppies are a blank slate (so says my friend who's job in prison for 3 years was training dogs) so they can certainly be taught. You may need to get them around another puppy, or a patient older dog, to understand.
 

stormsedge

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This is insane , you shouldn't be allowed anywhere near a dog or puppy.


The dog thinks like a dog. To project human thought processes or ideals on it is misguided. Treat it like a dog requiring a lesson to live peacefully and productively with its new pack. Does momma or uncle dog reason with a pup or nip it?
 

chris m.

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The dog thinks like a dog. To project human thought processes or ideals on it is misguided. Treat it like a dog requiring a lesson to live peacefully and productively with its new pack. Does momma or uncle dog reason with a pup or nip it?
Dogs have been domesticated for over 130,000 years according to recent DNA analysis. In that time they have evolved dramatically in order to be better adapted to living with humans, and as a result of extensive selective breeding. They are quite different from wolves or wild dogs.

Modern dog training techniques are based on extensive experience as to what works and doesn't work. Turns out dogs such as seeing-eye dogs are trained twice as quickly when the primary approach is positive reinforcement. Negative reinforcement results in twitchy, nervous, neurotic dogs that are worried about being yelled at/punished/hit. Ditto for other animals such as horses, humans, birds, etc.....

Do other methods work? Sure. But not as well. Go to a police, seeing-eye, emergency response, or other high stakes dog training school and you will see that the "show them who's the alpha dog" approach is no longer used.


 
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