Tritones

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by kbold, Dec 9, 2019.

  1. kbold

    kbold Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Well, I must have too much spare time.
    I've been taking some notes on tritones, so as to better understand them.
    A lot of squiggles soon starts adding up, so I thought I'd post my squiggles.

    It's still WIP, so comments or feedback (or, God forbid - errors) are appreciated.
     

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  2. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Thanks for the post. Studying is.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2019
  3. ddewerd

    ddewerd Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    This looks interesting, and is pushing the boundaries of my theory knowledge (although I could probably plow through some of it if I take the time).

    What would be interesting, and more practical for me, would be to see a few phrases tabbed out that use these concepts.

    That tends to be my downfall. I understand a lot of the theory, but I have a harder time putting it into practice.

    Cheers,
    Doug
     
  4. kbold

    kbold Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Tabs .... I'll look at that shortly .... or someone else might chime in.

    The introduction to "Heart of Stone" by the Rolling Stones starts with G7 that resolves to C. Play it with open chords.
    Look at the B & E string pair, and notice the G7 creates the tritone (B - F), which resolves to C (C - E).
    This is an example of a tritone "pushing" to resolve the dissonance.
    Now, play G7 - C just using this string pair (i.e. playing a diad). The tritone still sounds like a G7, even though you have not played the tonic or 5th notes.

    In fact, the first line of each verse goes: G7 - C - C7 - F
    So we see tritone resolutions twice in a row.
    On the C7 - F, you can clearly see this "push" on the D & G strings.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2019
  5. SecretSquirrel

    SecretSquirrel Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Interesting — saved it for later study, thanks!
     
  6. RoarDog

    RoarDog Tele-Meister

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    I've always considered tritones as the climax of tension, in other words it wants to resolve, or go home somehow. In seventh chord harmony the same tritone will be found in two chords G7 and Db7 for example having the B and F tritone. These chords can be used interchangeably in a jazz context. I've heard it called the flat 5 sub or the tritone sub. In a straightforward 2-5-1 progression say Dm7 G7 Cmaj7 I might play Dm9 Db7b9 Cmaj7 I will also use Emin7 as a sub for the Cmaj7.
     
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  7. kbold

    kbold Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Yes, I discuss this under "Tritone Substitutions with Dom 7 chords". My example also uses the ii - V - I chord sequence, although without chord extensions.
    I wanted to keep the pace and concept as simple as possible.

    Substituting Em7 or Am7 for CM7 are common deceptive resolutions, (i.e. resolving to iii or vi respectively).
    These are called Diatonic Resolutions (resolving to chords which are in the same key).

    Resolution pathways and deceptive resolutions (also called interrupted resolutions; but to me, deceptive resolutions sounds classier),
    is really another chapter, which I just touched on.
    I may need to expand on this topic: but it's a big hole for a big bunny. :lol:

    I like that. A nice way to describe tritones.
    I doubt there's ever been a horror movie without a Diminished chord just before the scary part. (That diminished chord, with 2 tritones!)
     
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  8. RoarDog

    RoarDog Tele-Meister

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    Cool info, I'm definitely going to the woodshed with this. I really like hearing the formal and not so formal names for various movements and progressions. Like I vi ii V and I vi IV V being referred to as the ice cream progressions lol. I've never heard the term deceptive resolution but I like it. It's always nice to put a name to a concept. I love posts like this because I learn better from ideas/concepts than licks etc. Great work!
     
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  9. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    That's a good guide about the tri-tone. One thing though.
    On the bottom of page #5 you mention playing (modally) over the chords with tritones in them ...
    "e.g. Em6 tritone G – Db (i.e. b3 – 6 tritone) only occurs in Dorian mode. So you can play E Dorian over Em6 chord."

    Enharmonically correct but it should be spelled G - C#. *In this case it's the #4 instead of the b5. The E Dorian mode (or parent scale of D major) is spelled E F# G A B C# D. You can't spell a scale or a chord with a repeating letter. The Em6 chord is spelled E G B C# with extensions D and F#, the 7th and 13th, occurring commonly.

    A small point but potentially confusing for those just delving into harmony and theory.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2019
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  10. Danjabellza

    Danjabellza Friend of Leo's

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    Did you get your notes from a Ouija board? Everyone knows tritones are the devil!
     
  11. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Is there a picture of Monk in the pdf?

    [​IMG]
     
  12. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    No standard notation?
     
  13. dlew919

    dlew919 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Very nice. Well done. Congratulations


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  14. kbold

    kbold Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    No ... Monk is a "resolution sceptic"
     
  15. kbold

    kbold Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Thanks. I did have a note somewhere wrt enharmonics, but removed it.

    I've changed my original: you'll have to use a pencil.
     
  16. kbold

    kbold Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    No. Didn't seem necessary.

    I thought showing fretboard layout gave a better "guitar based" representation of tritones, their modal relevance, and how they resolved.
    I think it may have been harder to grasp using standard notation.

    Or perhaps more to the point ... I'm standard notation challenged. :(
     
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  17. RoarDog

    RoarDog Tele-Meister

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    If this is what happens in your spare time I hope it happens often. I spent a good while in the PDF (had no issues opening it on an Android) I found it concise yet easy to understand. Looking forward to chapter two.
     
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  18. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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  19. rough eye

    rough eye TDPRI Member

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    if I may put in my 2 cents:

    if you know the circle of 5ths, each note's tritone is the farthest one away, the one directly across (12o'clock to 6 o'clock, for example). (oops i had to edit that because i forgot how a clock looks)

    everything starts with the circle of 5ths. know it.

    the tritone is the basis of all western music. every key has a tritone; moving in and out of chords containing a tritone is what makes the tension and release that our harmony is based on.

    next steps after that are understanding the 7b9 chord and how it leads to tritone subs, and the families of 4 dominants, but - without knowing the circle inside out that's all silliness. everything starts with the circle of 5ths.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2019
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  20. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    And....the tritone is the sharp of the 4th, correct? And the flat of the 5th?

    Thanks for the ‘family’ reference. I have been discovering this on my own, but reading it is informative...and maybe faster!!
    https://jazzworkshops.com/diminished-dimensions/
     
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